Sbírka odkazů

  • OTW Fannews: Speaking Out for Fandom

    By Kiri Van Santen on Pátek, 21 November 2014 - 5:27 odpoledne
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    Banner by Alice of a simple drawing of a human with a speech bubble containing a heart and a page of writing'

    • While quite a few articles in the media continue to portray fanwork creators as somehow abnormal, even while acknowledging their part within a larger remix culture of popular entertainment, others set fandom more positively in this cultural environment. This support has come from fans and entertainers alike.
    • The 'Not Another Teen Wolf Podcast' interviewed actress Eaddy Mays about fanfiction. "'First and foremost, the media portrayal of fanfiction infuriates me. It’s immature, among many things. It’s bullying. And it should be illegal, frankly." Mays proved herself an it-getter. “It’s when she’s talking about a book the Sterek Campaign sent her about the popular slash ship that you can see exactly how much she takes this issue to heart. She picks it up to make a point, flipping it over and noticing something written on the back for the first time...'It says, ‘Made with love.'' She has to pause, the emotion evident in her voice. 'Can you wrap it up better than that? I don’t think so. That’s it. It’s made with love. So why would you cast any dispersion on that?'”
    • Not all actors seem as in touch with slash fanworks. The Mary Sue focused on contrasting comments made by Benedict Cumberbatch and Orlando Jones in the same week, with Jones saying "'I get it—it’s another way to go but it’s no less valid than what we’re doing and it’s certainly interesting, so I really get a kick out of that. To read fan fiction and to see fan art and to watch other people’s artistry paint different colors on top of what we’re doing… how can you be mad at that? That’s just completely awesome!'"
    • At Bustle, Emma Lord wrote about getting over her embarrassment with fanfic and countering common arguments. "[W]hen did any form of writing get deemed 'lazy'? We’re actively creating something, whether or not it will be widely consumed or appreciated. We’re testing ourselves as writers all the time, trying to see if we can keep the original author’s characters true to themselves, or if we can find ways to surprise and intrigue readers who are into the same fandoms we are. That is the polar opposite of lazy!"

    Who have you seen standing up for fanworks? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Women's Experiences In Fandom

    By Janita Burgess on Středa, 19 November 2014 - 5:27 odpoledne
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    OTW Fannews Banner Women's Experiences in Fandom

    • Comic Book Resources reported on a NYCC panel about female fandom in which Kelly Sue DeConnick said, "'I think that there's an important thing to remember too, that what you're seeing now, the influx of female readership and female creators is not a revolution, it's a restoration...Back in the '30s and '40s there was a girls' magazine that had a distribution of 300,000 copies per month and it was comics... [In the decades since] women were discouraged, dissuaded, made unwelcome, and now for a plethora of reasons, women are returning...There are enough comics for everyone...Say it with me now: equality is not a loss.'"
    • In another panel at New York Comic Con, on harassment and assault, the "crowd was greeted with some sobering statistics...25% of women at cons have reported being sexually harassed, 13% report receiving unwanted, inappropriate comments, and 8% of all attendees have been groped or outright assaulted or raped." This sheds light on the post in The Awl discussing rape charges in web celebrity fandoms, which speculated on the thinking of perpetrators. "Internet celebrity is just another opportunity, like management or teaching or parenthood, to assert power over victims in new and profound ways."
    • Blogger ladyloveandjustice, wrote about why the Mary Sue is a sexist concept. "[O]ne of the CONTROVERSIES listed on the TV Tropes page is if a male sue is even possible. That’s right, it’s impossible to have an idealizied male character. Men are already the ideal. In our culture, male tends to be the default. Women take on the distaff parts. 'Him' and 'mankind' are what humanity are, 'her' and 'womankind' are secondary. Yet this isn’t true for Mary Sue as a term. That name was created first."
    • An article in The Guardian cited fanfic on AO3 and Tumblr as places where teenage girls are the creators of sexual fiction. "'There is a lot of PWP (short for ‘porn without plot’ or ‘plot, what plot?’) out there,' 23-year-old Julia Schnorrer said. 'However, every sex scene in fanfic always has a narrative, since it is integrated in a realm of existing characters. Characters are well-rounded human beings who also have a sex life – not off stage but right in the middle of it. Most fanfic writers are women, and I think it derives from the male gaze that dominates visual pornography.' In fan fiction communities, and on sites such as Tumblr, all types of sexuality are represented – as well as the absence of a sex drive entirely."

    Do women have distinct experiences in fandom? If you think so, write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: What's a Fanwork?

    By Janita Burgess on Pondělí, 17 November 2014 - 5:46 odpoledne
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    OTW Fannews Banner What's a Fanwork

    • NPR's "Pop Culture Happy Hour" featured a look at fanfiction with "resident fan-fiction expert, Petra Mayer" who was asked for some recs. Mayer herself reviewed After, and a discussion ensued among listeners as to whether or not RPF qualified as a fanwork. (Partial transcript available).
    • The Daily Dot featured a video it qualified as a fanwork, a genderswap Ghostbusters. "A bunch of middle schoolers put together a shot-for-shot remake of the original Ghostbusters trailer and managed to make it even better. This time around, boys are playing the roles of Dana and Janine, while the girls have the Ghostbusters and Louis Tully covered, complete with self-aware visual effects and gags."
    • Meanwhile the play Badfic Love focused on fanfic writing groups and their personal dramas. "Director Nick Thornton says this production shows just how much talent WMU theatre graduates have. Thorton says it also encourages artists to keep creating. 'We have so much power and we can go out into the world and create our own reality...In a world full of things that are saying, you know: stay at home, don’t do anything, tear down other people’s work. We’re kind of saying, you know, what is your world? What are you going to do with it?'”
    • Jezebel's interview about mpreg with the male mod of an mpreg site focused more on the interest in the topic than its history in fanworks. "Some of our writers focus solely on the birth while others only gloss over it. Some people love it, some people hate it—much like mpreg itself. The positive and negative aspects of pregnancy are usually always included, and many of our artists are sure to include them in their pieces. Pregnancy is made up of so many emotions, symptoms, and milestones. These are part of the visceral experience pregnancy offers, and our members love talking/drawing/writing about it."

    What examples of fanworks are your favorites? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Social Media for Fans

    By Kiri Van Santen on Sobota, 15 November 2014 - 5:36 odpoledne
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    • The Wall Street Journal wrote about different fandom activities on different social media platforms. "[T]he CW is trying just about everything in social media. Interestingly, once its fans tell the network which platform they want to use to interact with their favorite shows, the network leans in hard. 'We attack all the social media,' said Rick Haskins, the CW’s executive vice president of marketing and digital programs. 'Very, very quickly, the consumer says ‘this is the social platform we like [this particular show] on.’ When we see upticks, that’s when we move in quickly.'"
    • At The Daily Dot, S.E. Smith pointed out that not all fandoms embrace social media. "It seems to run counterintuitive to the idea that tech determines the pulse of popular culture. The NCIS website is crude and clunky, the show's Twitter is an anemic promotions vehicle, and the Internet doesn’t exactly come alive with fans livetweeting NCIS on Tuesday nights. The Internet isn’t interested in it for all the reasons that it appeals to vast numbers of viewers, illustrating that what the Internet wants from television is not necessarily what the Nielsen viewer wants."
    • The Asahi Shimbun discussed the importance of the decision to go royalty-free with vocaloid Hatsune Miku. "Developer Crypton Future Media Inc. released guidelines that acknowledge the creation of fan fictions for noncommercial purposes. To encourage collaborations between users, the company also set up Piapro, a social networking website where fans can post their songs and illustrations. 'It's meant to make creative efforts widespread without making users feel intimidated,' said Hiroyuki Ito, Crypton Future Media president."
    • Wattpad continues to pursue amateur authors and to focus on readers. In a discussion with The International Business Times, the inline commenting feature is mentioned. "This adds another dimension to the social interactions on Wattpad. With Inline Commenting, readers can comment on specific words, sentences and paragraphs of a story...Not only does Inline Commenting provide valuable and in-context feedback to writers, but it creates a new social experience for readers. It’s almost like they're reading alongside their friends and they can exclaim, commiserate, and react as the story unfolds."

    How have you seen companies developing content and features for fans? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fitting in Fanworks

    By Janita Burgess on Čtvrtek, 13 November 2014 - 5:32 odpoledne
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    OTW Fannews Banner Fitting in Fanworks

    • Blogger Marie Larsen wrote about her daughter's classroom success in writing fanfiction. "The story is a Transformers fan fiction piece, long enough and worthy enough of being an animated episode." But she was "concerned of its fan fiction style. Recently, I read Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell, where the main character received a failing grade from a teacher that didn't find any value in fan fiction. I wasn't sure how my girl's teacher would receive this piece." However, her story had a happy ending. "To praise her in front of her peers, to give her the only A+ out of all those very bright, accelerated students was a self-esteem booster I could never give her."
    • Dorkly featured 15 People Who Turned Wheelchairs Into Amazing Cosplay, including the Black Knight, Superman, Wall-E and General Loveless.
    • Engadget was one among many that featured a remake of The Empire Strikes Back utilizing fan clips. More than 480 fan-made segments were picked from over 1,500 submissions to make The Empire Strikes Back Uncut. The result included a mash-up of styles including live action, animation, and stop-motion.
    • The Blacktown Sun wrote about the fanfiction generated in a creative writing program. "Year 8 student Ashleigh's 27-chapter novel, Collision Course, was an extension of a fan fiction she wrote based on YouTube gamers Mitch and Jerome, known for their Minecraft reviews. 'I took the real people and twisted them to make characters that would fit the universe of the story,' she said." Meanwhile "Year 10 student Kate's 11,000-word novel The Fantastic Not-so-Real World of Samantha Colt balanced macabre, dark elements inspired by the Martin Scorsese film Shutter Island with bookish fantasy inspired by the film Inkheart."

    What fanworks have you fit into your life? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom is Sharing

    By Janita Burgess on Úterý, 11 November 2014 - 5:13 odpoledne
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    OTW Fannews Banner Fandom is Sharing

    • At Business of Fashion, Madelin Newman wrote about the rise of fashion fandom. "Jennifer Post, a Black Milk fan from California, has attended every SharkieCon since its inception and said it was unlike anything she had ever seen. 'With what other fashion brand do you have fans of the brand getting together to share in the joy of it all?' she said. 'Sharing styling tips, taking selfies, meeting people in person that you have chatted with online for hours at a time.' The depth of brand advocacy for Black Milk can be felt in the way community members create their own art, songs and photography for the label. One Sharkie even creates her own designs that she sells in a Facebook group called ‘For the love of nylon’ using old Black Milk pieces."
    • At TwinCities.com, the focus was on the shared experience of book fandom. "It's difficult to say whether more teens are reading more fiction than they used to -- but they are talking about books in unprecedented ways. From teen book clubs to social media, attending book signings and filling theaters to see the latest movie based on a young-adult novel, reading has morphed from a nerdy, solitary pursuit into a cool, communal pastime...Authors have become celebrities and there is buzz around books -- much in the same way there was buzz a generation ago around popular TV shows or bands."
    • The Journal Star featured one couple whose shared fandom experience continued into marriage. "'My goal is to become a little old lady in a nursing home with her,' Susanne said. Jennifer, the woman on the couch next to her, has the same wish. They met online, a pair of fan fiction aficionados. 'We’re both super nerds,' says Jennifer, tall and dark-haired, a cat lover and a writer."
    • Apparently shared fandom is so much fun even unrelated corporations want to get in on the act, as noted by The Mary Sue in regards to The Olive Garden twitter account. "Kirsten McHugh and Amy Ratcliffe made this brilliant discovery, and alerted the world to the awesome fan running the Olive Garden’s Twitter account. Olive Garden is definitely into Supernatural, Sleepy Hollow, and Doctor Who (and we can’t blame them). Here’ some of their best tweets."

    What things do you most want to share about your fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: IP From New to Old

    By Claudia Rebaza on Neděle, 9 November 2014 - 5:01 odpoledne
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    • A post at JD Supra focused on the way fair use is being seen in U.S. courts following a decision in Fox News Network, LLC v. TVEyes, Inc. "More broadly, decisions like TVEyes suggest that courts are moving away from viewing fair use as a narrowly-drawn exception to copyright holders’ exclusive rights in their works, to the view that fair use promotes the creation of transformative works and thus serves one of the goals of copyright law itself. The TVEyes opinion, which essentially presumed transformativeness of the work at the outset of the fair use analysis, suggests that the trend toward this broader view of the role of fair use continues to gain traction in the federal courts."
    • OTW legal staffer Heidi Tandy reported on a lawsuit against LiveJournal (LJ) that was thrown out of court. The company Marvix claimed copyright infringement when its photos were posted on the LJ community OhNoTheyDidnt. But Marvix failed to first file a DMCA takedown request, moving immediately to a lawsuit. "LiveJournal has done other sites, platforms, communities, fandomers, news sites and forums a great service by seeing this lawsuit through. Mavrix has a pattern of using a threat that sites owe it hundreds of thousands in damages if one of their users - or even they - post a single photograph owned by one of Mavrix's paparazzi."
    • In a column on intellectual property in India, Zoya Nafis wrote about trademark and fanfiction. "Intellectual Property Rights are granted with an objective that they shall promote innovation and encourage creators to create more. They act as an incentive to create the work. They should never be used to impede innovation. Fan Fictions are creations by amateur creators who if given opportunity might create something great in future; therefore a lenient and balanced approach must be taken towards them."
    • The copyright education project CopyMe released a third episode, focusing on the history of how copyright came to be. "On the one hand, history shows us that copyright was designed for control more than anything else and that the state got away with this for over two centuries. On the other hand, businesses always feared new technology and lobbied for state protection, with arguments about authors’ safety. These two sides have always lurked in copyright’s underbelly and, over the course of three more centuries, managed to erode all the public good that copyright was primarily designed to promote." (Subtitles available).

    What cases involving copyright and fandom have you seen? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Looking Back

    By Kiri Van Santen on Pondělí, 27 October 2014 - 4:26 odpoledne
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    Actress Alyson Hannigan posing with her doubles from the Buffy episode Doppleganger

    • Romance writer Keira Andrews discussed how attitudes toward fandom and fan fiction have changed over the years. "Fandom was Fight Club, and we didn’t discuss it with showrunners or actors... Sometimes I really miss the days of having our own secret world, but that horse is out of the barn and galloping out of sight... I honestly think that you have to be a fan to understand fandom. Many people know about fandom now, but they’re still Muggles, if you will. Or maybe Squibs."
    • Celebuzz ranked pop music fan base names. "In the world of pop fandom, it is de rigueur to name the fan base to which you belong (or to have your chosen idol name it for you.) Over the last several years, we have seen groups with nicknames like Little Monsters, Beliebers, and Arianators grow into power and change the way we talk about musicians and their fans."
    • On PasteTV, Amy Glynn talked about how binge-watching Buffy got her through her divorce. "All I wanted was a timeout from my own reality; a break. I wasn’t expecting a breakthrough. But a Joss-curated trip back to growing up showed me some interesting stuff about adulthood. It was also the first step back to my 'real' life, or whatever was going to be real from here on out. The first time around, Buffy made me laugh. This time, it made me see."
    • Keidra Chaney of The Learned Fangirl reviewed rock critic Gina Arnold's book about the 1993 album, Exile in Guyville. "[I]t’s about the culture and mindset of the early 90′s indie rock scene in Chicago and beyond, the hyper-masculine, hyper-obsessive club dubbed 'Guyville' by Phair and others at the time. It’s also about the changes in technology and culture that have changed what it means to be a part of the indie rock scene as a performer or a fan in the past 20 years."

    What changes have you seen in your fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Grabbing the Spotlight

    By Janita Burgess on Středa, 15 October 2014 - 4:32 odpoledne
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    OTW Fannews Grabbing the Spotlight Banner

    • A post by Denise Dorman at Bleeding Cool raised some hackles when she suggested that comics creators were losing money due to cosplay at cons. "Conventions are no longer shows about commerce, product launches, and celebrating the people who created this genre in the first place. I’ve seen it first-hand – the uber-famous artist who traveled all of the way from Japan, sitting at Comic-Con, drawing as no one even paid attention to him, while the cosplayers held up floor traffic and fans surround the cosplayers–rather than the famed industry household name – to pose for selfies. The hard-working artists and creators who are the very foundation of this industry…have been reduced to being the background wallpaper against which the cosplayers pose in their selfies. At what point do you start to wonder if...the general fandom population even gives a shit about the creators more than they care about their Instagram profiles?"
    • Certainly more creators are taking note of the power of fan gatherings to help market their work, such as at Wise Ink Blog. "At a recent book launch in DC, a couple twenty-somethings approached one of our authors and asked if they would be willing to do another event in the future. Talk about a writer’s dream! Not only did they show up to the launch, they wanted to come to another one! But these were not average book launch attendees. They were part of a DC Meetup group called Geeks’ Night Out. Why does that matter? Because they were a built-in audience for the book and we had no idea they existed. The fandom/meetup/Con trend is sweeping the nation and it’s high time that indie authors took advantage of it!"
    • Netflix has been doing various studies on user viewing patterns. Their latest one addressed spoilers and who spoils. "Today, talking about spoilers is just talking about TV; in fact, people aren’t willing or even interested in censoring themselves anymore. McCracken attributes this to better TV storytelling. Over the past few years, writers and showrunners threw out the rulebook, which has created a new and improved TV that is complex and morally challenging. TV has gotten so good that we need to talk about it. McCracken found that as TV evolves, so does the language and behavior of how people talk about their favorite shows. In his research, he identified five personality types -- based on how and why they might convey key plot points to their friends." These include The Clueless Spoiler, The Coded Spoiler, The Impulsive Spoiler, The Power Spoiler and The Shameless Spoiler.

    How are you seeing creators marketing to fans? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Celebrating Art

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on Sobota, 11 October 2014 - 6:05 odpoledne
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    Artist painting multiple characters on canvas
    • A Los Angeles art gallery presented exhibited fan art based on the work of Joss Whedon, with Whedon's enthusiastic encouragement. At the opening, Whedon praised the artists and spoke in favour of fanwork: "If I could do this, this is what I'd do. I'd do fan art, I'd do fan fic of the stuff that I love ... I just love the art so much... It's hard to process the idea that it has anything to do with me." [No transcript available.]
    • Norman Reedus of The Walking Dead is saying thank you for "the truck loads of amazing fan art" he receives by publishing a "compilation of artwork made by his fans. The Norman/Daryl archetype is created in tattoo designs, cakes, pencil sketches, mosaics and more ... It’s real art made by real people for real people."
    • FranceTV interviewed Emmanuelle Wielezynski-Debates about her new documentary on fans and fanworks. "Citizen Fan presents people who assuage the need to extend the life of fictional characters (of novels, manga, television, movies, video games etc...) who are important to them." The documentary covers a variety of fandoms and showcases fanworks based on Harry Potter, Disney, manga, and video games, in addition to analysing the "cultural, sociological, economic and also legal" implications of fanwork.
    • Media scholar Henry Jenkins also interviewed Wielezynski-Debates and declared Citizen Fan "may just be the best documentary about fan culture that I have seen." Noting that France is "a country which provided very little protection for fair use and transformative works...I had questions about how a culture built on transformative cultural production would thrive in this particular national context. At a time when many of us in fandom studies have been calling for more work in the global and transnational dimensions of fan culture, it’s exciting to have access to this rich database of how fandom operates in France."

    Have you been moved by multimedia fanworks? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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