News of Note

  • OTW Fannews: Shouting it Out Loud

    By Claudia Rebaza on Úterý, 17 November 2015 - 5:34 odpoledne
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    • More people are discussing the long reach of fandom into their lives. The Huffington Post spoke to the OTW and others about fanfiction and sexuality. "The opportunity to displace these risky desires, not just into pseudonymous fictions, but onto fictional characters, makes fanfic a welcoming sexual space for girls and women, where they can safely spin their more illicit fantasies off into the minds and actions of distinctly separate alter-egos. 'It made me much more comfortable in myself. More comfortable in my sexuality and going out to find other erotica and pornography without having to feel ashamed,' recalled Amy, 23, who lives in Portland and got into fan fiction early in high school. 'These are characters, but they’re also people, they do normal people things and that includes sex and other sexual activities.'”
    • The Deseret News spoke with various fans about how fandom has changed their lives. “'I started to feed back into nerd culture and all those happy feelings, basically everything that fandom gives you — not just escapism, but the immediacy of enjoying something with someone else,' Smith said. “'I realized nerdiness isn’t being happy alone, it’s about being happy with other people. Nerdiness saved me from myself.'”
    • The Salt Lake City Weekly spoke to Anne Jamison about why studying fanfic is important. "It's crucial for people who study literature to pay attention to this way in which writing is now being produced and disseminated. It's crucial for us as literature professors, because so many of our students will have read and written this way, [and have] learned to critique and engage this way—even if they sometimes won't admit it. It has had and will have an effect on published books, but it is also where we first see how digital, networked texts are changing reading and writing habits and expectations—as well as the texts themselves."
    • Certainly more people than ever are giving shoutouts to their favorite fanworks including Rainbow Rowell who when asked asked about her favorite said "I have a few. My favorite fanfiction is a Harry/Draco fanfiction and it's called The Pure and Simple Truth."

    What's been the richest part of fandom in your life? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: No Place to Hide

    By thatwasjustadream on Neděle, 15 November 2015 - 5:23 odpoledne
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    • AdNews discussed the use of YouTube fandoms as a marketing bonanza. "The quality of talent on display, and the reaction of fans got the point across about the premium content YouTube has to offer...Stuart Bailey, chief digital officer at OMD Australia, believes that, 'long gone are the days when clients would associate YouTube with skateboarding cats and other such content. It now has content credential in spades. Google certainly flexed their ‘influencer’ muscles and showed that some of their YouTube talent are stars in their own right, with engaged and loyal audiences - some queuing from 6am to catch a peek of their favourite YouTube stars,' Bailey said. 'The trick will be how to tap into that talent to not only communicate with a brand’s customers and consumers but to add value and customised experiences.'"
    • Comic Book Bin asked whether fan films should be crowdsourced. "I believe that copyrights holders should be tolerant of fan films and fan fiction but to a limit. When fan fiction and fan film creators earn money from the unlicensed properties they exploit, that is a problem. More than voluntarily breaching the rights of copyrights owners, they earn revenues from properties they have no right to exploit. If you want to make a Batman film, do it on your own, bear all the costs. Use it as a portfolio piece. But to go out of your way to ask people to fund your Batman film is wrong. You don’t own Batman."
    • MTV.com spoke glowingly about erotic fanfiction competitions and noted it's an expanding business. "If you’re not in San Francisco or New York, you can still observe the NSFW madness from afar. Shipwreck also has a regular podcast where they post recordings of their live show, as well as a Tumblr where you can read previous works — and last night they just announced they’ll be publishing a book sometime next year."
    • QSR promoted a Dairy Queen competition for fans. "Along with a new television advertising campaign dedicated entirely to Fans, both the Random Acts of Fandom Giveaway and the ad campaign showcase a wide variety of DQ Fans professing love for their favorite people, places, and things including vintage cars and the perfect nature hideout."

    What efforts to tap the fandom market have you been seeing? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Costs and Benefits

    By Kirsten Korona on Sobota, 14 November 2015 - 5:06 odpoledne
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    • Fan creators continue being confused about the legality of their work and clearly many don't know where to turn for answers. Luckily OTW's legal team keeps trying to get the word out. Two of our staffers appeared on the Fansplaining podcast and talked about "listener responses to the Wattpad episode, the purpose and projects of the Organization for Transformative Works, plagiarism vs. copyright infringement, and #FanworksAreFairUse." Legal Committee Chair Betsy Rosenblatt said, "[T]here’s a sort of personal autonomy element to fandom that I think is a really important thing to preserve. Maybe not the only important thing to preserve, but a thing that matters, and I think that’s part of what mattered to the [Organization for Transformative Works]." (No transcript available).
    • While copyright claims scale new heights of absurdity, TechDirt pointed out that other companies are reaching out to fandom. "When Rockstar released its own video editor for Grand Theft Auto 5, the move in and of itself received only mild applause. People have been using video games to make entirely transformative works for some time now. More important was the signal that Rockstar was sending: use our game to make fan films. This is smart for any number of reasons, but allowing fans to use games as they see fit makes those games more valuable to the market, and those transformative works ultimately only serve to advertise the original game in the first place."
    • Less often discussed in relation to fans' activities are how beneficial they can be. EdSurge hosted a post on the difficulty of getting kids engaged with schoolwork compared to how they excelled in their own hobbies and interests. "Finally, Annika is a video editor. She uploads twice a week to her Vocaloid Chorus channel. She started by wasting time watching anime. She began drawing manga, then started creating Vocaloid 'choruses' mashing up others’ work, and now creates her own Vocaloid 'covers' and participates in fan fiction. The adults in her life barely know what any of this is. Her learning environment is made up of online interest groups with individuals that challenge each other and share knowledge and skills. Too hard? Nope."
    • The Daily Dot took a look at the business end of things from a fan's point of view, detailing the expenses that go into being an anime fan. "Previously we’ve looked at the cost of YouTube fandom and what it would take financially to attend all the marquee events in the space for one year. With anime having a wider berth of events and a longer history, there’s a lot of ways to slice your fiscal fandom, but we decided to grab the biggest names in the community for our imaginary fan, to see how they stack up against the YouTubers."

    Do you have your own stories about what fanworks have done for you? Start a page in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Becoming the Norm

    By Sarah Remy on Úterý, 10 November 2015 - 5:16 odpoledne
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    • Variety gave the entertainment industry a heads up on a critical fair use ruling in a case involving viral videos. Fair use is the key copyright provision protecting fanworks in the U.S. "'Equals Three’s use of Jukin’s videos is admittedly commercial. Nevertheless, the commercial nature of the use is outweighed by the episode’s transformativeness,' Judge Stephen V. Wilson of the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California wrote in the Oct. 13 decision. What makes the use 'transformative' is not clear-cut, the judge noted: 'Determining whether Equals Three’s episodes parody Jukin’s videos is a difficult and nuanced task.' But Judge Wilson ruled that even if Equals Three’s episodes are not parodies, the episodes comment on or criticize Jukin’s videos and are therefore allowable under fair use."
    • An article in The Atlantic discussed the importance of the Google Books decision for fair use. "This isn’t only good news for fans of Google Books. It helps makes the legal boundaries of fair use clear to other organizations who may try to take advantage of it, including libraries and non-profits. 'It gives us a better senses of where fair use lies,' says Dan Cohen, the executive director of the Digital Public Library of America." What's more "Experts say that the Supreme Court is unlikely to hear an appeal, because so many district court judges, and two different federal circuits, have found themselves so broadly in agreement about the nature of transformative use online."
    • Another writer in The Atlantic noted that transformative use is everywhere in both authorized and non-authorized forms today. "The question for authors to consider in this brave new world of mimicry, both professional and otherwise, is to what extent they consider their characters to be theirs and theirs alone. For most, it isn’t something that will become an issue during their lifetime: Copyright law stipulates that books only enter the public domain 70 years after the death of the author, even if most fanfic writers aren’t limited in terms of what they can post online."
    • Digital Book World proposed that publishing focus on the content not the wrapper when producing work. "[F]an fiction has quite possibly become the biggest sleeper hit of the digital age. According to some estimates, around a third of all the content posted on Wattpad and Tumblr is created by fans. As a commercial proposition, fan fiction is embryonic, but I think publishers have a lot to learn from its speed and agility. Fan fiction stays close to its audience (indeed, creator and consumer are often indistinguishable), it centers on recognizable brands and it iterates quickly. And most importantly, it’s platform-neutral. The wrapper—whether this is a Tumblr post, Wattpad story or ebook—isn’t the end product; it’s a means of transmission."

    What do you think have been the key moments in the spread of fanworks? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Life and Times

    By Claudia Rebaza on Pondělí, 2 November 2015 - 4:59 odpoledne
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    • Latino USA aired a segment on diversity in geekdom which looked at video games, comic books, and cosplay. A Latino fan was interviewed about the introduction of more diverse comic book heroes, saying "It's intense to see all these races now, it's not just a white man's sport anymore." The interviewer noted that the con attendance was very diverse. "Not only are Latinos and other people of color everywhere but LGBTQ couples walk hand in hand, all ages are represented, and a few people with disabilities are pulling off some impressive costumes." (No transcript available)
    • The South China Morning Post reported on a Kpop fan who refused to learn English like her classmates because she wanted to learn Korean instead. "The girl has an encyclopedic knowledge of Korean pop stars, and her greatest interest was talking about South Korean dramas and music with her friends", the report quoted her mother as saying. "Her parents had banned her from using the internet and watching television at home so she caught up on her favourite shows when she stayed with her grandparents on the weekend."
    • The BBC reported on a special scene filmed for a Syrian fan who became a refugee. "Noujain Mustaffa is a disabled 16-year-old Syrian migrant...[who]...told journalists she had learnt English by watching the US soap opera, Days of Our Lives," though she missed her favorite character who had been killed. Comedian John Oliver arranged for a spoof scene in which Noujain's favourite character returned from the dead and gave her a shoutout by name.
    • RetailDive reported on the passing of an Apple fanboy who blogged about their stores. Gary Allen "shut down his blog in March after his diagnosis, choosing to spend more time with his family in his last days." However, "[w]riters at TechCrunch and The Washington Post hailed Allen’s attention to Apple’s stores, which he detailed at his blog that has now been discontinued, as an example of a singular and entertainingly articulated passion for the company’s choices in architecture and its courteous, well-trained store staff."

    What has marked your life in fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Fixing Fails

    By Pip Janssen on Úterý, 27 October 2015 - 5:00 odpoledne
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  • Black Girl Nerds hosted a discussion about race bending fanart, and its importance in increasing representation. "To behold an Aurora, with dark skin and a wide nose like mine, is an act of revolution. Her adornment of pigmented skin and black long locs is revolutionary. Her full lips signify the coveted trait possessed by numerous Black women like me. A brown Rapunzel, wrapped in a marigold sari is revolutionary. Her defiant brown skin distinctively pairs with a gold barrette in her long mane. These crucial depictions remind women and people of color of their beauty, existence and visibility."
  • The Toronto Star brought the Cosplay is not Consent discussion to a wider audience. "Similar signs have cropped up at conventions across North America, including New York Comic Con and Fan Expo Dallas. Organizers of Toronto’s expo, which wrapped up a four-day run at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre on Sunday, say it’s a sign of the times, but not a political statement...Discussions about consent and victim-blaming are a movement outside the convention world, too. Ontario’s new sex-ed curriculum includes lessons on consent in the primary grades."
  • The Daily Dot profiled a new film about a male slash writer and discussed the negative reaction to it in many fanfic communities. "'[Y]our pitch looks like one more male indie auteur trying to make his name off of the backs of women,' wrote slasher and filmmaker Franzeska Dickson in response to the Kickstarter campaign...The cultural pattern of erasing women from their own stories and histories they created for themselves is a long one, and fandom is no exception: An infamous episode of Supernatural—one of the most female-dominated fandoms around—once portrayed a Supernatural fan convention within the show as almost entirely male-centric...Although slash writers focus primarily on male characters and many actively advocate for queer representation in media, queer men don't actually make up a large part of the slash community."
  • Metro's list of 21 things only fans would understand was lighthearted but didn't overlook problematic issues such as fandom battles and a lack of perspective. Also noticed was the lack of perspective from outside observers. "You do get judged for getting so into something. Football fans who cry over their team losing are ‘passionate’. Coronation Street fans who cry over their favourite character dying are ‘sad losers’. How does THAT work?"

What fails have you seen fandom fixing? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Big Business Selfies

    By Janita Burgess on Neděle, 25 October 2015 - 4:32 odpoledne
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    • Here and Now did a segment on how important the Twilight film had become to the economy of the town it's set in. Focusing on the 10th anniversary celebration of Twilight's publication, the segment interviews citizens of Forks, Washington and discusses the events taking place. (No transcript available)
    • At Publishing Technology the economic impact of fanfiction is in focus. "[T]he way that fan fiction takes a piece of Intellectual Property and chops it up, plays with it and distributes it over multiple networks and media...is a very pure expression of the kind of creative approach to content exploitation that we at Publishing Technology have been talking to publishers about for a very long time. The possibilities opened up by digital media mean that the book is often only the beginning of the commercial life of a piece of IP. Yet it still remains the only focus of many publishers, who find it conceptually and practically difficult to unbundle the book and sell it as chapters, or a serial, or even a content marketing campaign paid for by a brand advertiser. The book is treated as the end-product of the publishing process, when it could be just the beginning."
    • Film School Rejects discussed how fandom documentaries are becoming a form of fandom selfie. "Other than that, Ghostheads doesn’t seem to have much of a reason to exist. Like too many other fandom docs, it’s not likely to reach or be appealing to the millions of non-extreme fans let alone total outsiders. It will tell a number of hardcore Ghostbusters fans things they already know about themselves and their beloved movie...I also wouldn’t be surprised if the studios start encouraging, maybe even secretly contributing to the crowdfunding of docs that in turn foster and support fans and enthusiasm for their upcoming slates. If nothing else, they might later on be cheap pickups to throw onto their Blu-ray releases of the original or new version of their respective properties."
    • Alaska Dispatch News mapped the growth of Senshi con "from [a school] cafeteria to UAA and in recent years mushrooming into an expansive convention housed in the Egan Center. Now celebrating its 10th anniversary, Bundick and other organizers are expecting more than 4,000 attendees, and Alaska Business Monthly is predicting it will produce an economic impact of $191,000" with the growth likely to continue. Its organizer said “We’re still getting [vendor and artist] applications for this year. This is the first time we’ve had a waiting list...Local people and businesses are wanting to get in on it."

    What sorts of economic and business growth have you seen tied to fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Creating & Remembering Fans

    By Pip Janssen on Středa, 21 October 2015 - 4:47 odpoledne
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    • Slate wrote about the University of Iowa's Hevelin Collection of fanzines, quoting the OTW's Karen Hellekson who wrote "fanzines were typically self-published pamphlets, made from 'stapled-together pieces of ordinary-sized letter paper, sometimes folded in half.' Fans would exchange these documents through the mail, often after discovering one another through the letters pages of magazines such as Amazing Stories...According to Hellekson, in those pre-photocopying days authors of zines would reproduce their work via carbon paper, mimeograph, or other similarly primitive means."
    • Texas A&M University now hosts The Sandy Hereld Memorial Digitized Media Fanzine Collection in remembrance of the OTW supporter Sandy Herrold. "Sandy’s legacy of work includes the founding of Virgule-L, the first Internet slash mailing list, hosting numerous other mailing lists and fan sites, and helping to create the annual 'Vid Review' panel at the Escapade convention (the longest-running slash fan convention), which became the model for serious conversations about vidding as an art form."
    • The Mary Sue discussed the difficulties in passing on fandom. "Sailor Moon was something we were really looking forward to sharing with our son. I knew that Usagi’s outfits, transformations, and quirky sensibilities would be right up his alley!...Within 3 episodes, I was horrified and questioning everything I ever knew about my love of the series. When all was said and done, we made it only 6 episodes in before I tragically put an end to it, completely taken aback. These girls were so vain, and her superpowers were triggered by a magical makeup mirror? I was right about my son, though: He was hooked."
    • Netflix released a study exploring when people became fans of a TV show. "While around the world the hooked episode was relatively consistent, slight geographic differences did present themselves. The Dutch, for instance, tend to fall in love with series the fastest, getting hooked one episode ahead of most countries irrespective of the show. Germans showed early fandom for Arrow whereas France fell first for How I Met Your Mother. In Better Call Saul, Jimmy McGill won Brazilians over one episode quicker than Mexicans. And Down Under, viewers prove to hold out longer across the board, with members in Australia and New Zealand getting hooked one to two episodes later than the rest of the world on almost every show."
    • WBUR had a segment where a couple tried to see if they could become baseball fans. "A change had come over Susie. Over the course of a few hours, she’d become a Cubs fan for life. In those same few hours, Kris Bryant had singlehandedly undermined our relationship. Just kidding. But as we headed home, even I, the longtime sports cynic, had to admit — that was incredible. It’s hard not to get caught up in the thrill of a dramatic win at home. But at the same time, I wondered if I should resent the Cubs for winning? Because I didn’t. And maybe that made me less of a Sox fan?"

    What fans do you want remembered for their contributions to fandom? Start a page for them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Relating to Canon

    By Janita Burgess on Úterý, 20 October 2015 - 4:42 odpoledne
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    • My Eastern Shore Maryland took note of a library event where participants could read their fanfiction. The practice is increasingly common wherever book lovers congregate. San Francisco's KALW focused on a regular bookstore event. "Make no mistake, Shipwreck peddles in extremity - it’s gross, sometimes way too gross for me. But even if the jokes are destructive, the audience is doing kind of what our high school teachers told us to do - critically engaging with the text. There’s no right way to relate to books, and Shipwreck underscores this idea through writing about muppet sex, glitter canon orgasms, and shocking acts between Ayn Rand characters. This may seem ridiculous to some who consider themselves serious readers. But this is the largest group of people I’ve ever seen in a bookstore, enjoying themselves raucously."
    • Iowa's Ames Tribune had a tribute to Terry Pratchett which exemplified the ambivalent feelings of some to fanworks. "Louis L’Amour died in 1983. I was 1 year old. I am an avid reader of his books, and a few years ago I read the first book in a planned trilogy. He died before penning the rest of the trilogy. My reaction was the same as when Pratchett passed, 'I wish he had more time! This is a very selfish wish but speaks to the hold that authors can have on our imagination and the place that they occupy in our hearts...For me, this doesn’t translate to wanting others to continue ghostwriting...I mourn the finality, but anything else would feel like a sham, not quite right. However, I do love fan fiction and the desire for people to continue a story that resonates with them so personally. I think that fan fiction can be enjoyed as its own unique being separate from the author’s own canon of published works."
    • Some, like Canada's Global News, seemed a little less clear on what fanfiction actually is, confusing it with cosplay. "Fans were eager to show off their original works of art, some designed by hand. 'This one I made myself so each of the leaves was stitched and glued on. There are over 3,000 leaves,' said cosplayer Melody Wood. The event offers an opportunity for the community to come together and celebrate a common love of fiction in all its forms. 'It’s growing, we are finding our community. Everyone is beginning to embrace their inner nerd,' said cosplayer Kris Brehaut."
    • Rocket News drew attention to Studio Ghibli fanart. "When you find something you really like, it’s sometimes hard to express how much it’s influencing your life. To show off how much they love something, some fans try cosplay or rampant consumerism. Others write songs or fan fiction to tell the world the extent of their affection. But for others, it’s as simple as drawing a picture that perfectly captures all their feelings on the paper...Going by the name GhibliLover92 on DeviantArt, this artist has been on fire lately, sharing tons of drawings and artwork that pays tribute to one of her favorite animation studios, Studio Ghibli. Each of her drawings is vibrant, colorful, and captures the joy and energetic feeling we all get when watching the anime production house’s movies."

    What sorts of tributes would you like to make to fanworks? Write about your favorites in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Generation Pride

    By Janita Burgess on Neděle, 18 October 2015 - 4:40 odpoledne
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    • The new generation of high school and college fangirls have taken note of the way their interests and activities are portrayed in the media, and by others around them. On the same day two articles went up in different college newspapers, by different writers, with the same title -- "In Defense of the Fangirl." At the College of William and Mary, Bri Little wrote "When we dismiss fangirls, we are telling them that it is unreasonable to expect emotional availability, love and acceptance from men. We are telling them that women are somehow undeserving of all these things. Of course it’s all an illusion, an image created to lure young women...But it’s often easier to fantasize about someone I’ll never have because I can imagine him treating me better than I’m treated by men I know in real life. We have to pay the price for wanting better for ourselves."
    • Meanwhile at the University of California, Berkeley, Jackie Roman wrote "The implications of the word 'fangirl' also create a divide among women at a very young age. To be a girl who is a fan of sports and screams alongside the guys during a game is to be a 'cool girl,' not a hysterical fangirl. The reason behind this is connected to our unequal respect for different genders. In this scenario, cool is code for what’s perceived as traditionally masculine. The girls expressing the same level of interest in football or other testosterone-dominated hobbies are seen as inherently different (read: better) than girls interested in traditionally feminine hobbies. And this is to no fault of the women who just want to watch sports without having their interest in it become some kind of sexual fantasy for a guy who glorifies the 'cool girl.' After all, they too are held to patriarchal expectations, only cool so long as they don’t become a tomboy and teeter across gender lines (oh, the binary!)."
    • Two days later at Duke University, Nandhini Narayana wrote about the misogyny towards fanfiction. "However, if people are to criticize fanfiction, then, they should be doing it for the right reasons, not because 'fat, illiterate, silly women who can't get a life' spend their time writing it. It is also true that a lot of online fanfiction is porn. Here’s a shocker: women enjoy porn. Women enjoy sex. Some people watch videos to masturbate, and some people read two thousand words of man on man action. Get over yourselves. Consider the term 'mommy porn.' The concept of a woman writing about BDSM and other women enjoying it apparently deserved a whole new category outside of regular porn. Why? To distinguish it from all the other 5 million pornographic resources on the internet that men enjoy and is, therefore, more serious?"
    • Lastly, at The Mary Sue Saundra Mitchell wrote about feminism and boybands. "What is feminist—what is spectacular— is that in this glossily packaged world of boybands, young women are creating a safe space for themselves. They’re not asking permission. They’re not apologizing. Their Kiss Me, Jong–hyun! and She’s my Louis Tomlinson t-shirts give no quarter. This is for them, and they don’t care if you like it. No wonder it drives men crazy. There’s no room for them here. And for the first time in their lives, they have no choice but to admit it."

    What fannish manifestos have you seen written? Start an entry for them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.