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  • OTW Fannews: Who's Fandoming Now?

    By Ellorgast on Úterý, 23 June 2015 - 4:29 odpoledne
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    Several people are silhouetted against a sky fading after sunset, posing as though dancing.  Text in front of them reads 'OTW Fannews: Who's Fandoming Now?'

    • South Africa's Daily Maverick provided an overview of fandom with some definitions. "You cannot be a part of fandom if you love something but do not interact with fellow fans. Fandom is less a kingdom of fanatics and more a kinship of one...Imagine this happening; a group of fans sit down, someone says I really thought x should have been y and almost everyone agrees on the fact. Not that big a deal, right? Now imagine that they do that same thing on the internet. Suddenly the scope of people who are meaningfully discussing and often reach consensus numbers in the thousands, tens of thousands, sometimes much more than that. That alone is a powerful thing; hard for the original creator of a book or TV show to ignore, but it is not the only powerful thing about fandom."
    • As each year passes, it seems most people take part in fandom in some way, however unlikely. It's also increasingly seen as a professional outlet. ABS CBN News featured live erotica readings in the Philippines that included fanfic creations, though these at least were created by the performers. " The writers dream up their concoctions in various formats: monologues, radio plays, fan fiction, interactive games. They draw inspiration from everywhere: history, art, science, comic books, movies. Once a draft is ready, it’s submitted to a core group of writers who conduct an informal workshop, offering comments and and revision, until there’s a general consensus that the work is ready."
    • The Daily Beast focused on print erotica, interviewing a writer selling U.S. president fanfic on Amazon. "'I wanted to write something that had never been done, but then I thought, ‘Oh, this is a really interesting idea,’' he said, before adding that in fact, presidential erotica has sort of been done. 'There was some [erotica] that involved sex with four presidents, but they were all consecutive. No one had sex with William Howard Taft (1909-1913) but also Richard Nixon." No mention was made of Historical RPF fanworks.
    • As a conversation between Neil Gaiman and Kazuo Ishiguro at The New Statesman pointed out, commercializing fanwork is hardly new. "I love the fact that, you know, in the early versions of King Lear, the story had a happy ending. Shakespeare turned it into a tragedy, and through the 18th and 19th centuries they kept trying to give it a happy ending again. But people kept going back to the one that Shakespeare created. You could definitely view Shakespeare as fan fiction, in his own way. I’ve only ever written, as far as I know, one book that did the thing that happens when people online get hold of it and start writing their own fiction, which was Good Omens, which I did with Terry Pratchett. It’s a 100,000-word book; there’s probably a million words of fiction out there by now, written by people who were inspired by characters in the book." (Gaiman is mistaken about the limits of his success, though).

    Make sure your own favorite fanworks don't get forgotten: write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Pushback

    By Kelly Ribeiro on Pátek, 12 June 2015 - 5:04 odpoledne
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    Star Trek

    • Some months ago, OTW Legal submitted an amicus brief in the case of Garcia v Google. Now the Ninth Circuit has reversed a panel opinion granting an injunction against Google, on the ground that an actor’s performance was not separately protected by copyright and that the First Amendment should have precluded an injunction. This is a great result for free speech on the internet!
    • In other legal news impacting fans and fandom The Telegraph revealed a proposal for police monitoring of fandom during the late 1990s. "It has emerged that Scotland Yard kept a secret dossier on Star Trek, The X-Files, and other US sci fi shows amid fears that British fans would go mad and kill themselves, turn against society or start a weird cult. The American TV shows Roswell and Dark Skies and the film The Lawnmower Man were also monitored to protect the country from rioting and cyber attacks."
    • The police have hardly been the only ones to mischaracterize fannish practices, as a Gizmodo article assigned credit/blame to X-Files fans for changing fandom. The entertainment industry was slower to change. "Even though the show’s crew was largely interested in the online fandoms, 20th Century Fox took a far harder stance, especially towards fan sites sharing unauthorized images of Mulder and Scully. Fans organized, fighting for their right to post artwork and stories about their favorite characters. Without pushback, the studio could’ve stymied the fan fiction community— as well as remix culture, which is also sometimes attacked as derivative— before it had a chance to take off."
    • On the other hand, Quartz singled out women's continuing contributions to fandom. "Women make up half the human race—including their perspectives makes for richer, better stories. But more than that, the presence of women in fandoms serves as a constant counterpoint to the dreary stereotype of sexless, gross guys huddling in their mothers’ basements. Geeks were never really like that to begin with: all sorts of people have always loved Dr. Who and Mr. Spock and Wonder Woman. The greater visibility of fangirls helps geekdom in general, by showing that there’s no one way to be a fan."

    When have you seen fans push back? Write about those events in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Securing a Place

    By Janita Burgess on Středa, 10 June 2015 - 4:26 odpoledne
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    Banner by Sidhrat in black white and red with an image of a padlock and the text OTW Fannews Securing a Place

    • Rocket News 24 posted about a fan anime film launched after a year of work. "YouTube user azuresakuga is a non-Japanese otaku with a passion for animating. He’s spent the last year working on a short animation of his own, combining all of his favorite anime characters into one all-star marathon. Ever since he shared it with the world, Japanese otaku have been praising it all over, and once you see it too, you’ll probably do the same."
    • Bleeding Cool wrote about the Machinima Event in NYC. "Chief Revenue Officer, Jamie Weissenborn took the stage to talk about who the 'audience' is for Machinima, and described them as being ethnically diverse, 'slightly more male' and having a 'higher household median income' than many other networks. He shared that Machinima content has a 97% 'like' rating, and used the example of the Halo: Nightfall launch featuring a fan art contest which went into 'overdrive' in page impressions. Crossing DC Entertainment with Machinima, Geoff Johns was introduced by video to talk about The Hero Project from DC. This is a new competition that will bring contestants to 'secure a place' in the DC Universe with props, and visual effects provided for them to make their own shows, it seems. The goal is to produce a 'live-action short video based on their own interpretations of characters from DC Comics’ Starman comic book series'."
    • Disney's Star Wars site interviewed art teacher George Folz, the creator of 'Darth Days'. "I’d been drawing almost exclusively with a pen for a couple of years, and something about creating ink drawings of him with a fat brush was just pure bliss. As comics are my bag, and I was looking for a personal project outside of The Roman Nose, I got the idea that I’d recreate a Darth Vader scene from the original trilogy every day of 2015."
    • A post at Union and Blue speculated on Fandom: Why Do We Care About This Nonsense?. "Many of us grew up with sports, like a one sided long distance family member, who is always there but our interaction is minimal. And when we finally get that in person experience, it evolves like a vacation far more magical than anything we feel past our teenage years. We love, we love, we care, we root...But there’s always a buffer...It’s that safe distance of caring and admiration that makes sports the ultimate getaway. You can still engage, you can still care, but even at it’s darkest days, it doesn’t devastate you the way life can."

    What amazing fanwork have you seen recently? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Fannews: It's the Little Things

    By Ellorgast on Pondělí, 8 June 2015 - 5:18 odpoledne
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    OTW Fannews: It's the Little Things

    • At Huffington Post, The Flash actress Candice Patton was happy to hear about fanfic about her character. "There's Iris fan fiction? That's news to me. I try to stay off the parts of the internet which pertain to me or my character to a large degree. But, I think fan fiction is a great way for people to express themselves and storylines they want to see. I think it's a wonderful creative outlet! I believe I wrote / read some fan fiction when I was a teenager. It was fun!"
    • Smart Bitches, Trashy Books ran a feature on The Romance Reader’s Guide to the Marvel Cinematic Universe which did not overlook fanfic. "If you like erotica and/or m/m: Fanfic. Oh God. SO MUCH FANFIC. We can safely guarantee that wherever your desires lie, there is fanfic about it. Some fan fic is totally non-erotic in nature – here’s a link to my fav purely SFW piece, “Steve and Natasha Go to Ikea”. Some of it is torrid beyond belief. A lot of it is m/m, so until we get a gay MCU universe character, Science Bros (among others), will have to tide you over if m/m is your thing."
    • At Collider, Anna Kendrick discussed the femslash aspects of Pitch Perfect and also her disappointment that not all of it is torrid beyond belief. "I’m not gonna lie to you, I tried to read one fanfiction because I was like, ‘I have to know’ and I was… maybe I chose the wrong fanfiction to read, but it was so slow. I was expecting it to be like, ‘Oh my God! I can’t believe they’re writing this crazy shit about me and Brittany [Snow]’ but there was a lot of exposition and I was like, ‘This isn’t a [Charles] Dickens novel’ so I gave up on it after that."
    • The Roanoke Times' introduction to its new crime reporter demonstrated that even professional bios might discuss fanfic. "Interesting fact about you that few know: I used to write fan fiction – mostly Teen Titans and X-men related novellas. I recently made the (probably unwise) decision to return to fan fiction, this time spurred by the Faustian anime series Puella Magi Madoka Magica."

    Where are all the places you're seeing discussion about fanfic taking place? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Participation & Representation

    By Katie on Neděle, 31 May 2015 - 5:00 odpoledne
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    Banner by Rachel of a generic newspaper with the OTW logo and the words 'OTW Fannews'

    • Several sites wrote about the effort to #DiversifyAgentCarter which was launched by the tweet 'Someone should create a #DiversifyAgentCarter tag & fill it with facts about the 40’s in New York so the writers have no excuse.'" As the post at Women Write About Comics discussed, "[P]eople began adding stories and photos of women and minorities who played integral roles during World War II and the post-war period, painting a much less white New York City than the one Agent Carter depicts, from Drag Balls to integrated government agencies to plenty of women spies. The hashtag is worth checking out if you’re interested in learning about some forgotten heroes of history."
    • A post at NPR's 'Code Switch' blog added: "Honestly, I blame Black History Month for this. So often, we focus on history that fits within a narrow range: The civil rights movement, the Civil War, American slavery and the transatlantic slave trade. While those are all important pieces of history to focus on, they are not the whole story — and they lead people who've only ever paid attention to black history during February to presume that we did not exist outside of those particular moments in time."
    • UCLA's Asia Institute hosted a presentation on Writing on Star Actresses: Politics, Morality and Literati Fandom in Early Republican Beijing. PhD candidate Jiacheng Liu had focused her dissertation on "how women, previously banned by the Qing dynasty, entered into the male-dominated theater profession and helped to reshape the repertoire and performance, redefine femininity, and facilitate a range of new social and cultural arrangements in the early Republican Beijing."
    • IBN Live recently brought back a more current example of Chinese fandom, this one focusing on 'F.R.I.E.N.D.S'. In an NPR feature, the owner of 2 cafes modeled on 'Central Perk' discussed its popularity. "Reruns of the show serve as a language-learning tool for Chinese university students. The show is particularly popular for its use of colloquial language and as an introduction to American culture. It's also popular because of the laid-back, friendship-filled lifestyle it portrays, far from the stressful, competitive world that Chinese young people inhabit. 'That's why we like Friends...[w]e're looking for this kind of life.'"

    Fanlore could use more content about non-English fandom activities! If you know it, share it -- contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: At All Different Angles

    By Sarah Remy on Čtvrtek, 28 May 2015 - 4:27 odpoledne
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    Fannews banner green chalkboard with pencil and white arrows plus OTW Fannews in red letters

    • A webinar presentation on Open Learning in Fan Fiction Communities was held at the Connected Learning site. Presented by several scholars from The University of Washington Information School, it discussed various aspects of fanfic communities, including a term they developed called 'distributed affect' which described "emotional experiences [that] could also be embodied outside a group and led to significant increases in collaborative creativity." (No transcript available).
    • The Education Institute is also holding a webinar, this one for librarians, titled From Marvel to Middle-Earth: Fanfiction in the Library. The session expected to cover various topics including "background on the various technologies and fan-centred services—such as LiveJournal, Fanfiction.com, Archive of Our Own (AO3), and Amazon Worlds—that have grown up around the movement and how they are used. Participants will also learn how they can be incorporated into a library setting and adapted for programs" as well as "advice on how to incorporate and lead fan-driven creative programming at the library that is exciting, collaborative, and instructional. This includes suggestions for how to structure meetings, encourage participation and creativity in young writers, and provide opportunities to grow and refine literacy skills such as writing and engaging with texts in a constructive way."
    • The University of East Anglia in Norwich held an academic conference on Frozen in May. "The one-day event, or "Symfrozium", on May 12 will be the first day of academia dedicated to Disney's film" and covered "feminism, the film's music, reworking of fairy tales and the role of love, and whether Frozen can be considered a part of the 'Nordic Noir' genre which includes Stieg Larsson’s altogether darker Millennium book trilogy."
    • Stamford, Connecticut's Daily Voice reported on a fandom storytelling event that encouraged participants to show and tell their stories of fandom. "The collaborative storytelling event's theme of fandom was inspired by Jeremy Deller's 'Our Hobby Is Depeche Mode.' Deller's feature-length video piece shows Depeche Mode fans from all over the world and is currently on view in the group exhibition 'It's gonna take a lotta love.'"

    What are your favorite fan studies works about fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Giving Some Credit

    By Pip Janssen on Pátek, 22 May 2015 - 3:18 odpoledne
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    Banner showing a cartoon figure holding a book that says I Wrote This!

    • A post at Polygon disagreed with fans' protests about game mods being sold on Steam. "Over and over, it’s been shown that when great content is rewarded with cash, better content flows forward. Of course, more crap will also flow in — but Steam has spent years improving its Workshop system to let the best content filter to the top. Modders will now have a reason to finish their work, and the best modders will find reward in the social aspects of the modding scene — as well as monetarily. The idea that adding a layer of real-world rewards will somehow stifle content is absurd."
    • Notwithstanding the lure of cash, game publisher Bethesda listened to fans and reversed its decision, even refunding earlier purchases. "[W]e underestimated the differences between our previously successful revenue sharing models, and the addition of paid mods to Skyrim's workshop. We understand our own game's communities pretty well, but stepping into an established, years old modding community in Skyrim was probably not the right place to start iterating. We think this made us miss the mark pretty badly, even though we believe there's a useful feature somewhere here...Even though we had the best intentions, the feedback has been clear - this is not a feature you want. Your support means everything to us, and we hear you."
    • Radio.com wrote about the contest run for Mad Men to reproduce its first episode. "Similar fan-made cuts of other movies have taken the internet by storm, including Star Wars Uncut, a project to remake the Star Wars films. That project began in 2009 as a lark by a then-20-something programmer and later went on to win an Emmy for Outstanding Creative Achievement in Interactive Media. Few of these types of crowd-sourced remakes, however, have gone on to be recognized in an official way or aired for millions on TV. This makes Mad Men: The Fan Cut a smart move on AMC’s part to rally Mad Men junkies as the show winds down, allowing them to re-enact favorite scenes and put their efforts back on the same screen that captured their imaginations seven seasons ago."
    • The Media Industries Project "examines the profound changes affecting media industries worldwide, focusing especially on creative labor, digital distribution, and globalization" and looks at what they call connected viewing, which they define as "any product or service that augments the entertainment experience by integrating Internet access, game play, and/or social networking." They look at various changes in entertainment consumption, including "How is connected viewing transforming the relationship of viewers to media content and access?" However, the MIP looks at the issue more in terms of how it challenges entertainment producers than in the relationship between audience and creators.
    • One area where the relationship between audience and creators continues to fail is in fanwork ambushes. Nerd Reactor posted about the latest display of fan art on a TV talk show. While acknowledging that "[s]ome fans have commented on the trend with criticism, saying that it is a way of shaming fans and making celebrities uncomfortable" the title of the article points out the real issue involved -- the lack of participation by fans. If the creator of the fanwork isn't known, it's probably because the media outlet in question failed to make any effort to contact them for permission, as well as failed to credit them on air.

    What sort of creator and fan interactions have been a win or fail in your experience? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Find Your Passion

    By Sarah Remy on Středa, 20 May 2015 - 6:11 odpoledne
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    Find Your Passion banner red arrows and yellow background

    • The new issue of Cinema Journal was guest edited by the OTW's Kristina Busse and she, along with co-editor of Transformative Works and Cultures Karen Hellekson, contributed articles. The entire issue is available for free online. Topics include articles on fan labor and feminism, fandom's gift culture, Fifty Shades and the "archive of women’s culture," and articles focusing on sampling, vidding, and cosplay.
    • Portland, Oregon's Go Local PDX hosted an article by a college admissions coach about getting writing experience. "Write fan fiction. If you care about an audience and feedback, writing fan fiction can be a great way to get both. Lots of people obsessively read (and comment on) fan fiction about their favorite characters, so a well-written spin-off from a popular novel or series can quickly develop a large readership. In addition, it’s easy to find writing prompts: people on fan fiction forums often run informal contests built around silly topics like 'a Les Miserables-inspired scene with a beach party.' Fanfiction.net is the main hub for this, but a quick search can help you find more specialized sites devoted to particular topics.
    • As a post at Candy Mag pointed out, prompts and fanworks are everywhere. Focusing on content at Pinterest, the post pointed out a variety of fandom crossover fan art exploring various fanwork genres.
    • Cult Noise interviewed Cassie Whitt about her defense of music fangirls. "You should never [be] afraid to be passionate about something. In fact, you should see your ability to do so as a strength most people don’t have. Love music in a way that makes sense to you, and as long as it’s not hurting anyone or yourself, what other people think about it doesn’t matter. And if you’re ever feeling misunderstood or without an outlet for that, find fan communities. All communities have different vibes: some of them will be good, others will suck, and others have the potential to become like a second family."

    Did you use fanfic to prep for college admissions? Are you taking courses about fanworks? Write about fandom and academia in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Doing it New School

    By thatwasjustadream on Neděle, 17 May 2015 - 6:11 odpoledne
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    curved lines drawn in purple, maroon, orange and yellow over a white background with shades of purple, tan and red filling the spaces between them and the word OTW Fannews Doing it New School written through the right hand side of the graphic

    • DNAInfo reported on workshops that use Sci-Fi, Fan Fiction to Teach Girls STEM and Writing Skills. "'A lot of the series that are popular today, like ‘Hunger Games’ or ‘Divergent,’ feature white characters...We think it’s really important to expose girls to visions of the future that have girls that look like them in leading roles doing the changing.' The project’s namesake, author Octavia E. Butler, inspired the founders to use science fiction as a way to talk about broader issues in social activism, gender, class and race. 'She looked at society through a real critical lens and didn’t sugarcoat anything...It blew me away because I never saw how sci-fi could be used to make me think of history and my own role.'”
    • Olin College professor Allen Downey had some of his students post a Bayesian Survival Analysis in A Song of Ice and Fire on his blog. "Using data from A Wiki of Ice and Fire, we created a dataset of all 916 characters that appeared in the books so far. For every character, we know what chapter and book they first appeared, if they are male or female, if they are part of the nobility or not, what major house they are loyal to, and, if applicable, the chapter and book of their death. We used this data to predict which characters will survive the next couple books."
    • MediaCommons is an academic site that hosts discussion on both courses, research and discussion surrounding reading, writing, and literature. Among the topics is fan fiction, such as this post by Charles Dunbar about learning to write outside one's comfort zone. "I had found the old notebook in which all those stories Colleen had been written into were hastily stuffed, and after reading them over, decided I had done a grave disservice to the character. Yes she was a fan-fiction creation, but she was also part of my writer’s experience, and as such I felt she deserved something more than the role of hostage-girlfriend...So I picked up a pen and began to write. But before I did, I decided to make one little change: rather than approach Colleen as the main character’s girlfriend…I made her the main character."

    Where have you seen appearances of fanworks in academia? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Celebrations of All Kinds

    By Claudia Rebaza on Čtvrtek, 14 May 2015 - 6:27 odpoledne
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    Banner by Alice of a laurel wreath and title 'Celebrations of All Kinds'

    • The Chicago Tribune reviewed the play Badfic Love. "Here's what works: all of the fanfic scenes with Connor Konz as Harry and Jake Szczepaniak as a delightfully dumb Draco. You root for these crazy kids, despite the (intentionally) terrible dialogue they're saddled with. It's legitimately funny stuff, mostly thanks to Szczepaniak, who gets the most out every slyly stupid line he's given...The story's creator is winningly played by Cristiana Barbatelli as a confident upstart who can't fully hide her insecurities. The pair meet under false pretenses and fall for each other, and this is where playwright Pasen folds in some noted jabs at the stale, unrealistic conventions of romantic comedy."
    • The BBC reported on a 5 year plan to mark the bicentenaries of the births of the Bronte siblings. In addition to touring exhibitions, a knitted Jane Eyre, and a collection of short stories, "[t]he society said its president Bonnie Greer was 'developing an award named after Patrick Bronte"...and was also working on an initiative with Bradford Council to commemorate Branwell Bronte. The playwright was also making a short promotional film with the museum to 'invite people to come to Haworth during the bicentenary celebrations' and planning a 'Jane Eyre fan fiction" workshop in London."
    • Forbes covered the Star Wars Celebration in Anaheim and attempted to predict the future of its fandom. "Even in a fantasy universe, the lines between fact and fiction are hotly disputed. That’s a good thing. A year ago, Disney decreed that much of the so-called Star Wars expanded universe was, in essence, fan fiction...That didn’t sit well with some die-hard fans, many of whom had become pseudo-history professors of the deepest reaches of Star Wars mythology...Yet even on Wookieepedia, the site home to over 120,000 pages of fan-generated content—much of it concerning storylines now relegated to Legends status—the response hasn’t been negative, at least in terms of engagement. Says Brandon Rhea, a full-time community manager at Wikia, Wookieepedia’s parent company: 'The pageviews in general shot up.'”
    • CBC News took note of the reaction to actor Jonathan Crombie's death. "Plenty of women who were in their adolescence during the late 1980's have indeed been mourning the loss of the handsome man who portrayed Gilbert Blythe on screen — but they're far from alone. It would appear as though, just like the wider Anne of Green Gables franchise, Crombie has continued to rack up new fans from all over the world since the final film aired on CBC TV in 2000...Here are just a few of the ways that fans have been paid tribute to Anne Shirley's 'perfect boyfriend' on Tumblr, on their own blogs and through romantic fan fiction over the years."

    What different kinds of fandom celebration have you seen? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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