News of Note

  • OTW Fannews: Commercial Opportunities

    By Sarah Remy on Čtvrtek, 15 October 2015 - 4:25 odpoledne
    Message type:

    fannews banner showing pennies and dimes on a black background, commercial opportunities written overtop

    • Airlock Alpha posted Ann Morris' discussion of What Mainstreaming Of Fandom Has Done For Me. Namedropping the OTW's Fanlore, she notes that tech advances have helped her follow her fannish interests despite having low vision problems. "I have low vision, and it used to be super annoying to go to the library and try to find large-print science-fiction books. The people who published large-print books didn’t seem to think that anyone with low vision would be interested in those weirdo books with the rocket ship on the spine. Here’s a pet peeve which is fortunately a thing of the past. The Science Fiction Book Club and the Large Print Book Club were owned by the same company. And yet, they did not publish any science-fiction books in large print. Augh!"
    • At MTV.com Taylor Trudon thanks the makers of Almost Famous for being able to see herself on screen. "When adults don’t take the ideas, passions and dreams of fangirls seriously, they’re missing out. They’re missing out on finding possible solutions to major social problems. They’re missing out on the opportunity to ask important questions. They’re missing out on the chance to view the world through a different lens and in doing so, are missing the voices that have the potential to change it."
    • At Popzette Tom Smithyman looked at how fannish activity is driving the growth of crowdfunding. "'We’re making the ‘Star Trek’ that we all want to see,' Peters told a crowd at the San Diego Comic-Con. And, judging from fans’ response, Peters is correct. An initial Kickstarter campaign netted more than $100,000, and led to a second initiative, which raised more than $600,000. It also sparked a competition among the crowdfunding sites to house the second. The campaign has since moved to Indiegogo, where it has raised an additional $525,000."
    • Autostraddle's Fan Fiction Friday column is expanding because "fandom is more powerful than ever...And because money makes people in charge pay attention, and social media makes our voices hard to ignore, the folks who make TV are listening and responding to us, both on-air and in real life...starting this week, Fan Fiction Friday will...include fan fiction recommendations, of course, but it will now also offer you news round-ups about fan culture, interviews with fic writers and TV writers and TV recappers and TV directors, mini-essays about fandom from people in fandom, polls, discussion questions, infographics, advice about harnessing the power of fandom to affect real change, and a grab bag where I answer questions people have been asking me."

    What commercial opportunities have you seen opening up because of fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Unearthing Slash

    By Janita Burgess on Neděle, 4 October 2015 - 3:59 odpoledne
    Message type:

    OTW Fannews banner by caitie~ with the text Unearthing Slash along with stylized images of the members of One Direction with slashes between them

    • Vice speculated on why adults read One Direction fanfic, and discussed the appeal of slash. "The appeal of One Direction homoeroticism also seems related to how physically comfortable and genuinely playful the boys are with each other... It seems related to the fact that they are boys who sing songs about feelings and look like they mean it. It seems, unfortunately, related to Louis's irreverent-shading-into-dickish personality, which fans... wish to understand and explain away. Perhaps most significantly, it seems related to taboo and tragedy: how impossible to fall in love with your best friend, while the whole world watches, and also how beautiful."
    • Certainly the ease of stumbling on fanfic has created awkward moments for the subjects of that fiction. NME quoted The Libertines discussing the unnerving combination of fact and fantasy. "A lot of effort has gone into it. There’ll be a poetic stream of consciousness and then suddenly, BANG! My cock will appear in Carl’s ear." The singer added that some of the descriptions were uncannily accurate: "I think it must be written by someone close to us, because apart from the actual sex side of things, which obviously isn’t true, some of it’s quite close to life."
    • The Daily Dot provided a bit of fandom history by discussing Man from U.N.C.L.E.'s slashy past. "As fandom academic Cynthia W. Walker put it, "if Trek was the Big Bang, (Man from U.N.C.L.E.) was the primer." The Man from U.N.C.L.E. was the patient zero for the kind of passionate fan community we see for shows like Sherlock today." It was notable in many ways. "At this point it's practically tradition for TV shows to misinterpret which of their male leads is the real heartthrob. From Spock to Teen Wolf's Stiles, female-driven fandoms tend to gravitate toward the characters who aren't portrayed as suave ladykillers. And back in the day, Illya Kuryakin was a bona fide teen crush magnet."
    • One bit of progress (?) in media coverage of slash is that the pairings are no longer the main surprise to people. Cracked's video gets a lot wrong, such as confusing characters and fandoms with genres, and discussing commercial bestiality erotica series as works of fanfiction. But the idea that pairings might consist of same sex doesn't itself get dubbed as 'weird'.

    Is slash history something you know about? Share your knowledge on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Celebrating Fanart

    By Claudia Rebaza on Pátek, 2 October 2015 - 3:31 odpoledne
    Message type:

    Banner by doughtier reading 'Celebrating Fanart' with the OTW logo as a balloon and its string looping around the letters

    • The Daily Dot directed readers to a Mad Max: Fury Road fanart piece "in which the entire story is retold as an Egyptian hieroglyph." The amazing thing about these is not only does the hieroglyph feature actual Egyptian cuneiform, but that even if you're not a fan of the film, you can still get a sense of the story from this design: the great mythic city with its powerful ruler and citizens desperate for water, the escaping wives, the pursuing warboys, and the savior Furiosa."
    • Bookriot shone a spotlight on Fandom-Inspired Quiet Books. "[T]ouch-and-feel books are amazing and they should start making them for adults...Even better than a cloth book, though, are quiet books (also known as busy books). These are soft books that have little activities to be completed: usually buttons to be fastened, zippers to zip, and velcro pieces to be moved around. Quiet books are not very common in kids’ book publishing (probably because they’re more intensive to make), but lots of crafty people have created their own. This means they can be tailor-made for the recipient, and many people have used this to create amazing fannish quiet books!"
    • Radio Times got in on the act by identifying a variety of fan art celebrating all 13 Doctors. Unfortunately many media outlets tend to use the word 'best' to describe 'whatever we were able to come across in a Google search', and, as they admit in the article, not all of the 13 artworks were even done by fans. They do, however, represent various styles and mediums.
    • Interviews with the artists are even less frequently included in the 'look at this fanart' articles. These Curious Times rights that wrong by interviewing Pangaea Starseed. Asked, "What’s something that you wish people would ask you about your art? (Or what would you like for people to know about your work?)" Pangaea replied, "I think I just want people to be aware of how many layers of detail, balance and composition, symbolism and story-telling actually goes into these pieces. Even if it looks like I’ve just splattered some paint over some line work . . . I try to be very deliberate in my work."

    What pieces of fan art do you think deserve recognition? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Merging Into Literature

    By thatwasjustadream on Neděle, 27 September 2015 - 5:44 odpoledne
    Message type:

    image of books stacked in a small pile with the words OTW Fannews next to them

      Fanfiction discussions continue to crop up alongside other discussions of literature. Montana's Missoula Independent promoted a fanfiction reading by pro writers at a book festival. Meanwhile, an Italian literary festival had a session on fanfiction writing. "Traditionally ignored by the publishing and media industries, fanfiction has been referred to as the refuge of frustrated aspiring writers...The subject is more articulated however, because it touches upon - and includes - literature criticism, copyright, cultural influences, social constructs, and it can't ignore the changes happening in the publishing industry. It's an ongoing conversation that involves an ever growing number of authors, scholars, fans and readers."

    • Not mentioned there but referenced in various other places discussing the new Millennium series novel, was that original fiction increasingly crosses over into fanfiction. "From the reviews and what I’ve read so far, The Girl In the Spider’s Web is a very competent and perfectly entertaining act of literary mimicry, recreating the feel of the characters and the world of the first three books as well as the technothriller procedural plots. But the question is, is there more than that to it? Does it have Larsson’s undertone of political anger and activism against injustice, misogyny and corruption, or is it just a fun pulp romp for the beach? Is it more than just fan fiction? Is that all the fans want? How does it feel to read this knowing that had he lived, Larsson would almost certainly have written a fourth book completely differently?"
    • A post in the Nevada Daily Mail about a local creative writing group discussed fanfiction as an option for writers. "[I]t can be a fun distraction from one's professional writing. And a distraction from your regular writing is one of the problems with fan-fiction! Still, if you have a favorite show, movie, character, etc., that you want to create a new story about, do a search for that one interest and fan-fiction about it. I'm sure you'll find lots of reading."
    • A discussion in Variety with Bryan Fuller touched on the lapse of canon into fanfiction, even when it's being written by its creator. "I feel like it was a unique experience of myself as a fannibal, writing the show as I imagined it — it was my fan fiction — and then sharing it with other fan fiction writers who then elaborated on it in their own ways. It was a wonderful communal experience. I’ve never had a show in the thick of the Twitterverse like I did with 'Hannibal,' and it was a really fantastic, exciting experience, and hopefully one we’ll be able to repeat on 'American Gods.'"

    How have you seen fanfiction merging into literary and canon worlds? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Finding Connections

    By Claudia Rebaza on Pátek, 25 September 2015 - 4:04 odpoledne
    Message type:

    Banner by Swimmies of graph paper with a magnifying glass over a check mark next to the word 'Finding' and a pen circling the word 'Connections'

    • USC News put a spotlight on a seminar connecting scifi fandom to the gay rights movement. "Gender Studies 410 will ask students to conduct original research using materials from ONE Archives at USC Libraries, the largest LGBT archive in the world." Joseph Hawkins, who teaches the class and directs the archive, discussed how writers and publishers used experiences in one area to develop activism in others. "The stories and commentary in these journals served as incubators for ideas that would lead to political organizing decades later. Sci-fi allowed readers to safely engage with thoughts about alien races with mixed genders or finding love despite their differences."
    • Milwaukee Public Radio featured an art exhibit in Racine which "explores science fiction and fantasy-based themes of Doctor Who, Star Wars, superheroes, and steampunk." The curator explains that the purpose of the exhibit of textile art is to open a dialogue between artist and audience. "Sub-Culture Craft' features art inspired from various fandoms, which creates a lighter atmosphere with open conversations expressing enthusiasm from both artists and fans alike."
    • The Daily Dot featured the work of various fan artists to explore Disney princess remixes. "While these redesigns have become so massively popular that they've been turned into parodies, the fan culture that created them remains seriously dedicated to the practice. Part of the appeal is that the nature of these subversions invites us to think about the inherently heteronormative worlds in which Disney characters live and ultimately thrive. The worlds they inhabit often look very different from our own. And if you want more representation for other kinds of people and relationships, where better to find it than fanart?"
    • At ComicMix Emily S. Whitten expounds on what years of GISHWHES activity has brought us. "Other than all of the nifty things accomplished due to Gishwhes, I think the biggest thing I take away from it is the warm and positive attitude of the competition and everyone involved. It’s encouraging and inspiring to see all of the people who have chosen to celebrate and express their fandom in a fun and inclusive way; especially because, in the end, it is always our own personal choice as to how we want to move through the world; and how we choose to put ourselves out there can have bigger consequences for change than we can ever imagine."

    What connections have you found in fan activities? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Influence

    By Claudia Rebaza on Středa, 23 September 2015 - 3:20 odpoledne
    Message type:

    Banner by SoyAlex of concentric circles with 'Fandom Influence' emerging from the center

    • At Destructoid, Laura Kate Dale discussed how the fandom's version of Sonic the Hedgehog prevailed over various canon changes. "[A]n element of consistency to the image of Sonic did remain among the core gaming audience, fueled largely by the actions of a very small section of the fan community. Sonic remained his consistent edgy aspiration figure online for years in very devoted parts of the Internet, oft mocked by those in the wider gaming scene who came across them. DeviantArt original Sonic characters whose names alluded to preteen angst and rebellion, very visible fan-fiction communities and heavy romanticizing of anthropomorphic characters remained a consistent aspect of the mascot's visible face, only becoming more visible with the increased prevalence of the Internet."
    • Tech Insider posted an article pointing out how valuable fanworks can be beyond the texts themselves. "Since Todd's work started gaining popularity, a Wattpad representative says they've seen reads of these stories increase on the platform. Thanks largely to Todd, Pride and Prejudice currently has over 3.5 million reads on Wattpad and Wuthering Heights has just over 1 million. Staggering numbers, when you consider this is a platform best known for fanfiction stories about Disney princesses and Justin Bieber."
    • Writing at The Guardian, author AL Kennedy discussed writing a Dr. Who tie-in novel and perfectly described the exhilaration of fanworks. "It’s sad that so much of the air has gone from literary endeavour, that academic theorising and categorising have come to decide which novels are acceptable and reviewed, that literary publishing has squashed itself into more and more predictable boxes more and more often. Storytelling, company, human solidarity – they never go away, but they do seem to be moving away from the mainstream. It will be the mainstream’s loss. Readers will always go where they can find the joy they knew in childhood, the joy they deserve."

    How have you seen fandoms and fanworks influencing canon? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Seeing True

    By Janita Burgess on Úterý, 22 September 2015 - 4:18 odpoledne
    Message type:

    OTW Fannews banner by Tea Berry-Blue with the text Seeing True under a spotlight next to a pair of eyeballs

    • Media coverage of fandom has increased enormously but still has a long way to go in terms of understanding fan activities. TechTimes recently examined Twitter activity around the HBO show Looking and erected a dichotomy between parody Twitter accounts and fanfic. "It might seem far-fetched to think of Twitter parody as a form of fanfiction, but there is one link that connects the two genres in a dogmatic yet infallible way: the necessity of a reference point."
    • At The Daily Mirror, marveling at fanfic word counts on Fanfiction.net counted as a news report. "A Coronation Street superfan has written a story about feisty factory boss Carla Connor that is longer than the Bible." The post concluded with a list of high wordcount, multichapter stories without ever analyzing the content itself.
    • A post at Movie Pilot claiming to provide a history of fandom managed to write an overview of comics and media fandom without once mentioning the existence of fanworks. "Nowadays, it's a serious thing to be a fan. To be a fan may mean you enjoyed a movie - or it may mean you want to debate its finer points, comparing its continuity with one earlier in a series. To be a fan may mean buying a Director's Cut with extra scenes, so you can better understand elements of the plot; it may mean picking up the strangest tie-ins imaginable, up to and including survival guides to an alien world; and it may mean becoming part of a community that shows every sign of flourishing."
    • A post on io9 suggested that fandom documentaries are responsible for overcompensating and projecting only positive stories about fans and fandoms, leading to inaccurate portrayals of their topic. "By now, the formula for a geek doc has been set: collect shots of fans getting fannish (wacky costumes a must), follow a few special geeks in depth, drop in a celebrity host to make it legit. There must be at least one couple who found love through the fandom, and at least five people from Portland. Yet all too often, even the most heartfelt fan docs feel hollow. To figure out why, it’s time to revisit the granddaddy of the genre, and still one of the best: Roger Nygard’s 1997 film Trekkies."

    What do you think have been the most accurate portrayals of fans and fandom in the media? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Defying Expectations

    By Claudia Rebaza on Čtvrtek, 10 September 2015 - 3:01 odpoledne
    Message type:

    Banner by Elena of a globe surrounding by smiling female faces with the title 'OTW Fannews: Defying Expectations'

    • Fandoms have a variety of problematic behaviors, including how women's participation is welcomed. Sports marketer Amanda Curry complained about the nature of some efforts to reach out to female fans. "Despite their attempts to empower female fans, creating a program that perpetuates the stereotype that women know nothing about sports only further de-legitimizes the vast majority of us that do. Dumbing down sports for women not only makes us feel bad, but it allows others consistently treat us like we're dumb. This makes it harder to gain respect as a fan, and in my case, as a professional in the sports world...I am a female who works in the sports industry, and I know how it feels to have my opinion rejected just because I’m a woman."
    • CNN reported on the reaction of Star Wars fans to the bullying of a girl who loved displaying her fandom. "At this new school Layla started coming home more quiet and less of herself, and started asking not to wear her shirts or R2-D2 jacket" her mother said. "The girls in school were telling her she shouldn't like 'Star Wars' because it's for boys." However, after other fans began sending her gifts and messages of support, her enthusiasm returned. "Layla now feels loved and accepted in her stormtrooper uniform, and recently got a chance to meet one of her heroes, Weird Al Yankovic, who has two 'Star Wars' parodies in his repertoire. An added bonus...is that Layla enjoys surprising people who expect to see a boy behind the stormtrooper mask."
    • Henry Jenkins was recently honored by the Science Fiction Researchers Association and used the opportunity to discuss fandom's history when it comes to diversity. "Those of us who pioneered fandom studies too often bracketed race and class in order to focus on gender, sexuality, and generation. As we sought to validate forms of cultural production and experience that were meaningful to us, we neglected the fact that our own ranks were still too narrowly constituted and that there was more we should have done to validate forms of culture that were meaningful to a more diverse population. However much we might have sometimes felt like outcasts in our own lives, we were still in a privileged position to help inform what kinds of cultural production and reception mattered in an academic context."

    How have you seen fans defying expectations? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: OTW Sightings

    By Janita Burgess on Úterý, 8 September 2015 - 4:31 odpoledne
    Message type:

    OTW Fannews banner by Ania Kopertowska with a picture of a viewfinder overlooking a river with the words OTW Sightings

    • Members of OTW's Legal Committee have proposed panels for next year's South By Southwest (SXSW) conference on fair use and fandom. They are asking for fans to support the inclusion of these panels by either logging in to the SXSW official website and upvoting a session on its info page, or by commenting via Disqus on that session’s info page. The panels are Copyright & Creators: 2026 and FYeahCopyright and Fanworks.
    • MediaPost discussed when and how creators should try to target fans in order to help promote a project. "The first thing entertainment marketers should do when looking to harness the power of fandoms is to understand what makes them tick...Go beyond the obvious appeal of a TV show – the characters, plot lines and themes – and dig into the details and nuances such as vernacular, recurring motifs and magical moments that empower fans and make them feel like part of something bigger."
    • Gizmodo provided a lengthy look at AO3 features as part of offering a guide to the "best fanfiction" available. One thing not mentioned were bookmark searches and the rec feature. However the post did mention how "[u]sers on Tumblr, Livejournal and other networks will often curate 'recs' pages of what they consider the best stories. So if the sorting options on AO3 aren’t enough, do a web search for a pairing or fandom and related recommendations, like 'harry potter fic recs.' Individual, dedicated archives in the older style still exist as well."

    What OTW sightings have you seen around the web? If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages!

    Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Staying Vigilant

    By .EliseThrasher on Neděle, 30 August 2015 - 7:04 odpoledne
    Message type:

    Text backgound overlayed with a Batman Mask alongside the article title OTW Fannews: Staying Vigilant

    • The Japan News posted a story about how a Trans-Pacific Partnership crackdown could affect fanfiction publishing. "[T]he 12 nations engaged in the TPP negotiations are building a consensus that would allow for prosecution of copyright infringement without the need for a formal complaint, but instead based on reports from third parties or an independent judgement by an investigative authority." This contrasts with Japan's current system, "copyright infringement can only be investigated after a formal complaint from the creator of the original work or its rights holder."
    • Changes to their system would also allow for many false claims to result in takedowns. Kotaku reported on the widespread action against videos that had no connection to copyrighted content. "Last week, the anti-piracy firm Entura International, which frequently works with Pixels distributor Columbia Pictures, filed a big old DMCA complaint—as first reported by TorrentFreak—that goes after a bunch of videos not for pirating or violating copyright in any way, but for using the word “Pixels,” which it turns out was invented in 2015 by Adam Sandler."
    • The Daily Dot reported on an alarming development connected to Windows 10's End User License Agreement. "Microsoft won't hesitate to make sure the programs and games you have installed on your computer are legitimate, and if not, it has the right to disable them." The agreement includes preventing "unauthorized hardware peripheral devices" but who determines legitimate use could be a problem.

    What areas do you think fans should remain vigilant about? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

Stránky

Subscribe to News of Note