Sbírka odkazů

  • OTW Fannews: Uncomfortable Topics

    By Claudia Rebaza on Neděle, 15 June 2014 - 3:57 odpoledne
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    • At Buzzfeed, Alison Vingiano wrote about the history of trigger warnings. "By the early 2000s, the term had found its way to LiveJournal, where it was used on fan fiction. Gaby Dunn, a writer and early adopter of Tumblr and LiveJournal, said when she was using LiveJournal around 2001, fan fiction communities warned one another of explicit content but seldom used the phrase that has been adopted today. 'When we’d write fan fiction on LiveJournal, we might say, ‘This includes a rape storyline,’ or something, but that phrase [‘trigger warning’] was never used.'"
    • Australia's Star Observer wrote about the Queermance festival "Despite the demographic of those attending, [organizer] Lang stressed Queermance was a queer festival, and most of the authors and industry professionals speaking on panels and delivering workshops came from the queer community. The strange dynamic this created, where queer industry professionals were addressing a mostly-straight audience, was a topic of conversation for festival attendees." Speaking about the ethics of this difference, he argued "'truthfulness' [was] more important when it came to representations of marginalised groups...'I know some of them do feel it’s escapism and why can’t we write the fluffy, romantic stories where men are in touch with their feelings and all that… Can you idealise men? Yes. Can you idealise men to the point where it’s no longer realistic and attainable, and is that desirable? I don’t know.'”
    • A post at Gender Focus by Amy Imhoff discussed Gender, Power and Violence in Fandom. "[W]e wonder why some male geeks want women to be pliable creatures, affirming their life choices by agreeing with them at all times or existing for their visual, sexualized pleasure. If you dare to defy these stereotypes, you are automatically a total bitch who can’t take a joke, needs to lighten up, shouldn’t be upset because any male attention is good attention, or are being dramatic. Even Felicia Day mentioned in her blog post that as a result of her championing the #YesAllWomen hashtag, she knows she’ll get numerous unfollows and trolls bloating the comments by insisting that feminism = hating men."
    • A post at Smart Bitches, Trashy Books also touched on#YesAllWomen and fan conventions. "It took me me a while to see how BayCon, Smart Bitches, and other places, real and virtual, where we share our passions and our stories, intersect with #yesallwomen. They are, in essence, the same thing - flawed, messy spaces in which people struggle to find community, hope, and liberation. They are places in which we gather for support. They are places in which we gather to have our stories heard, and they are places where we struggle to understand our history and create a vision of the future."

    What fandom debates have you heard about? Create some entries for them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Legal Topics

    By Claudia Rebaza on Úterý, 10 June 2014 - 4:23 odpoledne
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    Banner by Sidhrat of a pair of glasses laid on an open book

    • The Age reported on a lawsuit involving the founders of The Writers Coffee Shop. "The lawsuit asks the court to recognise that TWCS is an ongoing partnership and, as a partner, Pedroza is entitled to 25 per cent of the profits. Pedroza and Beebe are seeking...'to trap funds not yet paid by Random House'" as a result of their rights purchase for Fifty Shades of Grey. The plaintiffs claim that Amanda "Hayward, 'fraudulently' restructured TWCS under the guise of tax minimisation, without the knowledge of the partners, so payments from the Random House deal, signed in March 2012, flowed exclusively to herself."
    • A post at Screen Invasion suggested that companies using Amazon's Kindle Worlds were setting a precedent for the “potential market” factor of fair use. However, it is the pornier side of fanfiction that is likely to be unaffected. "TV’s GG can show a blush-worthy encounter between Chuck and Blair in his limo’s spacious backseat...but Kindle Worlds can reject a GG fanfic that describes a similar tryst based on the author’s word-choice. Ergo, sites featuring only blue fan-fiction do not impact the same market(s) as their un-obscene peers." This argument tracks to the case involving The Wind Done Gone, since part of that legal argument was that there was no lost revenue because Margaret Mitchell's estate would never have licensed such a work.
    • Evergreen State College's student newspaper posted an open letter from faculty about threats to academic freedom involving a parody theater piece about Disney content. "On Monday of week eight, without consulting the faculty sponsors, Dean Reece issued a written request to fundamentally alter the script, with indication that the college would prevent the students from using campus facilities to perform the script as written." The letter cited the fair use aspects of the work and their belief that a fear of legal action was behind the effort to alter the performance.
    • TIME looked at aspects of One Direction fanfiction following a high-profile fanfic book deal. "Jamison also notes that the idea of making money from fanfiction — something long seen as dubious among fans, even as recently as 50 Shades of Grey — doesn’t seem to be so strange to younger and newer fanfic writers...After all, it’s much less legally thorny to file off those serial numbers when the inspiration is reality: changing the names of a boy band doesn’t risk overstepping the fair use of someone else’s creation. And besides, it’s a time-honored tradition. As Jamison says: 'Every fiction author bases their characters on real people.'”

    What fandom-related legal issues have you heard about? Create some entries for them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanfiction in the lexicon

    By Claudia Rebaza on Neděle, 8 June 2014 - 4:43 odpoledne
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    Banner by James of a quill pen resting on a sheet of paper with writing on it

    • Gamescene hosted a paper on Fanfiction as Critical Play. "By allowing the larger fan community to access and interact with the fanfiction, the piece contributes to the larger agency of the fans over the source universe. This allows for more fans to participate in the remolding of a fiction that they did not create, examining societal, cultural, political, and personal themes through both the inherently subversive act of writing fanfiction, and through the content and themes contained within the individual fanfiction. The fanfiction writer employs concepts such as unplaying, reskinning, and rewriting in order to acknowledge and further explore the subversive elements of their version of the source. This makes fanfiction a form of critical play."
    • The Asian Age discussed Bollywood fanfiction. “'The joy lies in weaving new narratives with the characters you love,' says Aayat Malik, a DU student and Fanfiction writer whose present work-in-progress brings Harry Potter’s Patil twins to Mumbai after completing their magical education at Hogwarts, also incorporating characters from the recent Hindi movie, Hasee Toh Phasee...She goes on to point out how visiting many popular Indian entertainment websites brings to notice that the largest volume in terms of the sheer number and length of Fanfiction writings exists in the realm of Indian television."
    • Gizmodo explained design fanfiction. "There's actually an existing analog for this trend: Fanfiction. The comparison isn't as far flung as it seems. It's just where fanfic writers turn their own creativity upon existing characters and plot lines from their favorite books or TV shows, designers turn to their favorite Brands. Spec episodes of My Little Pony and ludicrous concepts for the next iPhone have a lot in common."
    • Various media outlets took note of the fannish terms, such as fangirl, being added to the dictionary by Merriam-Webster. The Times of India devoted some time to explaining 'shipping'. "Usually, fans will give a couple their own moniker, often a portmanteau of their names. X-Files fans liked to use Sculder or MSR (quite simply Mulder-Scully Romance). Any kind of relationship can be acknowledged. From the obvious 'will they, won't they' couples to inter-species intimacy, one rule of the shipping community is that if at least one person wants to see a certain pairing, then it's a legitimate ship. Nor is it limited to modern-day culture; you'll find sites dedicated to shipping the heroes and heroines of classic literature, such as Jo and Laurie in Little Women."

    What fanfiction terms have you learned about? Create some entries for them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fannish Histories

    By Kiri Van Santen on Středa, 4 June 2014 - 5:49 odpoledne
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    fannish histories

    • The New York Daily News was one of several media outlets reviewing a book about Bob Dylan fans. "These anecdotes are juicy enough and artfully told, but they don’t get at the heart of what makes Dylan fandom different from other kinds of fandom. The Beatles, the Ramones, Neil Young and Madonna, just to name a few, have all inspired similar obsessions. Hyperactive tape trading, for one, certainly isn’t unique to Dylan fans. Just ask any Deadhead. It’s only when Kinney turns to the Dylanologists that have devoted their lives to ferreting out the meanings behind Dylan’s music and art — rather than collecting his grandmother’s candy bowls — does he get at what makes Dylan so singularly attractive, and infuriating."
    • While quite a few sites highlight fan art, Hypable's look focused on the fan as well as the work. "I don’t think there was ever a time in my life when I didn’t spend all day watching TV. It started with Cartoon Network and as I grew up it moved on to sitcoms, crime shows, medical shows, sci-fi… I always loved making manips, I started when I was about 10 years old. I didn’t have photoshop back then so I used Paint to crop pictures and it could take a few days to crop one. Then my uncle gave me a CD with Photoshop and made my life 100 times easier and my manips 100 times better."
    • K-Drama Stars also did a fannish profile of a Nigerian fan whose homesickness was eased by fandom. "Oky thinks that American television has a lot to learn from k-dramas in terms of the way they portray romance. Less can be more when it comes to creating dramatic romantic tension. 'They can express it more PG,' she said...Watching the dramas made her more curious about Asian culture, which she knew little about when she first moved to America. Now, she is learning the Korean language and has plans to visit South Korea next year."
    • Club Jade looked at the history of women in Star Wars fandom. "I have been very lucky in that I did most of my fandom growing up in spaces that were heavily female, from the early ship-war days to Club Jade to the fanfic community. That’s not to say jerks don’t happen in such spaces – the Star Ladies invented Attack Pattern Clinique back in the days of AOL chat rooms for a reason – but for the most part I ‘grew up’ in fandom areas where women and their contributions were unquestioned, where the idea that Star Wars needs more women was simply a given."

    What's your fannish history been? Write about what you've seen on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: The fandom business

    By Claudia Rebaza on Úterý, 3 June 2014 - 4:12 odpoledne
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    Banner by Robyn of the post title with $ signs as S's laid over a photo of world currency

    • Fan conventions range from small to large, fan-run to commercial, but increasingly conventions are big business. ICv2 wrote about data from the online ticketing platform Eventbrite. They found "sustained year-over-year growth of 20% or more since 2007...But what’s most interesting is that the dollars generated by cons...[are] in some cases, triple digit revenue increases from 2011-2012 and 2012-2013." Also interesting is that while "[o]ver half of fandom events on Eventbrite between 2011 and 2013 are categorized as gaming events...anime and comic events drove 70% of gross ticket sales."
    • Attendance is up so much at some cons that tickets are scarce. As an article in The Examiner pointed out, "Gen Con is having difficulty keeping up with the tremendous growth of its attendees. Thing is, it's not just limited to Gen Con. The geek population is exploding so quickly that popular events that service all kinds of fandom can no longer keep up." Writer Michael Tresca suggested that "Gaming event organizers will need to consider investing the money they are raking in from increased fandom back into the convention by expanding the number of days, expanding the number of locations, or holding multiple iterations of the con."
    • The Beat expanded on the ICv2 piece, discussing how Wizard convention revenues were up 188%, yet Wonder Con hadn't made enough money for San Francisco, leading to its departure. "It may not be the greatest convention if you operate a five-star hotel or Michelin starred restaurant, or you’re a City Hall lobbyist who represents those types of interests. Whether it’s true or not, the perception is that the heavy geek demographic spends a majority of its disposable income inside the walls of WonderCon."
    • Some of that disposable income is going to artists, providing an entirely new way to make a living. Newsarama explored how the rise of the appearance fee is turning guests into con employees. "Just a few years ago, the standard was that a convention would fly and hotel a creator, and slide him a free artist alley table as compensation for a con appearance. Now...[r]ates typically start at about $500 on the low end, and can quickly rise to $5000 or $10,000 for top-tier talent...If you want a genuine Dr. Who (Matt Smith) or a lady-killer Thor (Chris Hemsworth), the fee can be $100,000, plus perhaps a few Van Halen-esque riders as well."

    What examples of the changing fandom business have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Changing how things are done

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sobota, 31 May 2014 - 4:38 odpoledne
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    • PBS's Idea Channel did a piece on "The Future of Fandom" and featured discussion about fans' effects on copyright, including the stance of the OTW and the work of OTW legal staffer, Rebecca Tushnet. "In 'I'm a Lawyer, Not an Ethnographer, Jim': Textual Poachers and Fair Use, Rebecca Tushnet explains Henry Jenkins' sense that 'fans usually enjoy [an original work], but also see its flaws and gaps, which their work attempts to address and, sometimes, redress.' Fan works like Fanfic, fanvids and remixes celebrate, critique and extend beloved media, but they also exist in uncertain legal territory. They're necessarily built on copyrighted material, the owners of which are occasionally super hostile to any co-option, even loving co-option." (Transcript available)
    • While not directly connected to fandom, a recent court ruling raised concerns about what can be published about people online. NPR's All Things Considered discussed the potential changes. "Usually, the content that we talk about with the right to be forgotten is much more salacious. This guy wanted an old debt to be removed from his Google search results. He took his complaint to the Spanish Data Protection Agency, who determined that he did have a case for the right to be forgotten. And the agency ordered Google to remove links to that content. It moved through the courts as Google appealed it and the case that came down was shocking, I think, for most people."
    • Another court ruling included discussion about fan sites and works more specifically. The Supreme Court ruled on the case of Petrella v. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, a case in which the owner of a screenplay alleged copyright infringement. In her opinion, Justice Ginsburg stated the following: "[T]here is nothing untoward about waiting to see whether an infringer’s exploitation undercuts the value of the copyrighted work, has no effect on the original work, or even complements it. Fan sites prompted by a book or film, for example, may benefit the copyright owner. See Wu, Tolerated Use, 31 Colum. J. L. & Arts 617, 619–620 (2008). Even if an infringement is harmful, the harm may be too small to justify the cost of litigation."
    • While some think that fanfiction should be licensed in the future, the Deseret News wrote about Lucasfilm's decision to wipe out earlier canon, turning it into licensed fanfic. "Lucasfilm announced the Star Wars Story Group in January, which was created specifically to sift through the plethora of Expanded Universe content and decide what was and wasn’t canon, according to BleedingCool.com. The answer? Apparently none of it was. But it’s not all bad news for Expanded Universe fans...Instead, it will be rebranded as 'Star Wars Legends' and continue to be published and made available to fans."

    What examples of fans' changing things have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fans running the culture

    By Claudia Rebaza on Středa, 28 May 2014 - 4:14 odpoledne
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    Banner by Diane of a concert crowd depicted as colored outlines

    • Arthur Chu wrote at the Daily Beast about Battlestar Galactica as the turning point for fanfiction invading popular culture. "[T]echnological change has accelerated to the point where nerdy and obsessive and living inside your own personal fantasy world you seek to realize is not only no longer the liability it once was, it’s practically a requirement for the new economy. Try getting a job at a 'disruptive' Web 2.0 start-up and saying that your favorite entertainment is reassuring sitcoms about ordinary domestic life. The creepy kid who was once ostracized for drawing weird futuristic cityscapes populated by cyborgs all day is now your boss, and his utopian/dystopian vision for the future just got him a million-dollar round of investor capital."
    • Mary Grace Garis at Elle agrees, discussing how fanfiction made her a writer. "[W]e live in a weird postmodern society that celebrates media reinvention. People livetweet Scandal and then write think pieces on why Olivia should end up alone. They form snarky communities in the comment section of episode recaps. They create dialogues, make critiques, and most of all, take creative agency with these texts, be it in the form of memes or mashups. So knowing this, as well as insider language that communicates fan ideas and beliefs, is valuable currency in this economy."
    • Alan Kistler wrote at The Mary Sue about a psychology of cult TV panel. "Scarlet added, 'I think that TV shows allow us to form a really important connection at a time when we really need it.' She then had the audience show, by raising their hands, how many of them had gone through something difficult in their lives and then saw the experience or the feelings surrounding it reflected in a favorite TV show, book or comic book. Many hands went up. Scarlet said, 'It can feel really validating and you can feel like someone gets it . . . Over time, we learn to trust characters. We learn to open up with them, we become vulnerable with them.'"
    • The Phillipine Daily Inquirer discussed the pop-culturization of Philippine mythology. "'Our teen readers gobble up YA novels from the US. They’re reading! We should give them Filipino YA novels to gobble up.' The Philippine Board on Books for Young People, of which Sabido is chair, is putting together a 2014 middle grade and YA novel writing workshop called 'Kabanata.' 'We hope the workshop will produce 10 novels in English and 10 novels in Filipino.'" They hope to hook readers by developing fan communities. "'We’re really hoping people would contribute their fan art and fan fiction when they finally get to know the world of Janus Silang'."

    What examples of fans running their cultures have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom and food

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sobota, 24 May 2014 - 3:27 odpoledne
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    Banner by Ania of the edge of a food plate

    • Singapore Showbiz wrote about the rise of TV-themed dinners surrounding fandoms with a strong focus on food. "Passionate fans have even taken it upon themselves to create a Game of Thrones' cookbook...with recipes for the dishes described in the series." The group featured has "plans for more TV- themed dinners, with plans for 'The Hunger Games', 'Downton Abbey', and 'Hannibal' dinners in the works."
    • As an article on KDrama Stars points out, fan meetings with or without food are hardly new. The Korean Drama Group started as a yahoo group in 2003 and has been meeting annually. Its fans discussed how their interest branched out from TV shows. "Some of the group's members have been inspired to learn more about Korean culture. Some take language and Korean cooking lessons. Some members of the group traveled to Korea on the k-drama tour inspired by 'Winter Sonata.'"
    • Eating celebrations can be city-wide as shown in this article by Colorado Public Radio on Star Wars themed events in Denver. "The vegetarian restaurant City O’ City and its adjoining live art space Deer Pile are hosting their third annual 'May the Fourth Be With You' party. This year, Mutiny Information Cafe, 3 Kings Tavern and City Hall have joined the roster of venues participating in the interplanetary festivities, helping spread the 'Star Wars' fandom from South Broadway through Capitol Hill."
    • MomClick featured one fan who connected with actor/writer B.J. Novak through food. "Known for his role as the intern on the popular NBC sitcom 'The Office,' he was also one of the writers for the series...In honor of Novak's book...Jen's sugar cookies were shaped and decorated around a theme of one of [his] stories, 'From the story about a red shirt, a mirror the size of Earth, to a story about what happened when the tortoise rematched the hare...I tried to get as creative as possible and to add a little bit more showmanship. They were delivered in a box decorated as the book jacket.'”

    What examples of fandom and food have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Tech and legal developments

    By Claudia Rebaza on Čtvrtek, 22 May 2014 - 4:52 odpoledne
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    Banner by Bremo of webpages that are mentioned in this article

    • The New York Times Bits blog was one of several places highlighting the work of OTW legal staffer Casey Fiesler, who examined Terms of Service at popular websites. Among them was DeviantArt, Fanfiction.net and "Asianfanfics, a small fan fiction site, whose terms of service provisions, the researchers wrote, allowed 'for the site to essentially do whatever they like with whatever is posted there without any notice or attribution to the creator.'" The report included a handy infographic. A future part of Casey's study will involve the AO3.
    • The Mary Sue posted about using Storium. "As I quickly figured out, Storium is essentially an elegant framework for simming, with the added kick of card game-ish mechanics. For the uninitiated, a play-by-post game (also called a sim) traditionally takes place on a message board or through an email list. There’s a basic premise, and a host who wrangles the players. Depending on the game, players either create whatever characters they fancy, or are given clearly defined roles...The players then take turns writing chapters or scenes, typically tagging other characters to pick up where they left off."
    • Perhaps relatedly, Brie Hiramine asked at Flavorwire if the fansite is dead? "I can’t remember the last time I visited a fan site to read news or discuss anything. And that’s simply because our ever-flowing stream of content means that fan culture is more integrated into our everyday lives (and therefore, our Internet lives) than ever before. People consume fan-specific news on more mainstream platforms, without needing to go to a dedicated site to do so. Thank you, Facebook feed! Thank you, Twitter debates! Thank you, Reddit! And inevitably, the distance between consumer and producer grows ever-smaller."

    What legal and tech developments have you seen that are fandom-related? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: The importance of fangirls

    By Claudia Rebaza on Úterý, 20 May 2014 - 4:00 odpoledne
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    Banner by Lisa of a black & white photo of fangirls in the 1940s waving photos

    • Game designer Jane Jensen took issue with the idea of female role models in a Gamasutra post, suggesting that writing hot men is a worthy pursuit. "Reason #1: Female gamers will love you for it. There are, in fact, a large portion of women who play games. According to the ESA, 45% of all gamers are female. This varies greatly by genre, I’m sure. But if women do tend to play the type of game you design for, then why not give them a male character they can salivate over? Because…Reason #2: Male gamers are okay with it...Reason #3: Pop culture says it works."
    • Writer Brian Fies wrote about the problems women have in the comics field beginning, "Comics has a female problem. Girls and women don’t always feel welcome. They bring uninvited baggage, like feelings and opinions. They create and buy the types of stories they want to read. Even worse, sometimes they create and buy ours." He cited how "Cartoonist Noelle Stevenson drew a comic about visiting a local comic book shop to support her friends’ work and being mocked by staff who asked if she wanted to buy a 'My Little Pony' book while she was at it. Stevenson is one of the hottest talents in comics right now, and her webcomic 'Nimona' is a regular stop of mine. She creates the content that keeps those jerks’ shop in business, yet they humiliated her and chased her out the door."
    • Blogger mylifeinverse wrote about the importance of fangirls. "The fandom world isn’t just online, and it isn’t something that pales in comparison to 'real life.'...fandom is something extra, something wonderful, something worth exploring. It is an unbreakable bond with people all over the globe, it is passion that can turn to positive action, and it is an identity that is as real and significant to fans as their last name or hometown." So "Don’t make fun of fangirls; they’re incredibly brave to throw themselves into something with no promise of tangible returns. Don’t dismiss fanfiction; it is proof of passion, of dedication, of skill. Don’t demean fandom; this subculture has a purpose that is in no way sub par."
    • Also important is when fangirls spread their fandom to the next generation. In an article for USA Today, Matthew Forbes wrote about his mother. "Kiss played for about an hour and a half, and my mom held me up on that seatback the entire time. I don't think she caught a single glimpse of Kiss the whole night. Looking back, I don't know how her arms didn't get tired. Today my memories of the show itself are pretty spotty, but I've never forgotten the experience, and never forgotten what my mom did to make sure I got the night of my 11-year-old life."

    Where have you seen the importance of fangirls? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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