Sbírka odkazů

  • OTW Fannews: Fanwork Inspiration

    By Pip Janssen on Středa, 28 January 2015 - 5:23 odpoledne
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    Image of birds flying in blue sky with overlaid text

    • ComicBook.com recommended that readers check out the Five Best Fan-Made Superhero Series & Short Movies. "In case you didn’t notice, Comicbook.com is really into covering fan-made films and web-series. YouTube and increasingly-intuitive technology has made it easier than ever for passionate fans to share their own tales about superheroes, video game characters, or whatever fictional realm that’s captured their imaginations. It’s fan-fiction for the 21st century, and never has it been more abundant and impressive. This year marked a rather significant turning point in fan-made films with Nightwing, a YouTube series that scored almost $35,000 in Kickstarter funding for production costs. What resulted was one of the most highly-produced fan series to hit the Internet so far."
    • The inspiration mentioned in the above article was evident when Patton Oswalt discussed the effect Star Wars had on him. "I could imagine that these characters would go off and do other things, have other adventures. I'd draw cartoons of what this one guy in the cantina went and did after that scene…you felt there were all these little stories happening after you'd left these characters, all these other avenues to explore. It was like Fisher Price's My First Fan Fiction, and that had never happened to me with a movie before."
    • The Tyee suggested that January would instead be a good month for people to hunt out popular fanfic online, even if they shortchanged the number of online archives. "Boy bands aren't your thing? Well, you're in luck then since Wattpad also publishes stories about celebrities and Harry Potter characters. Or you can find tales more to your taste at any of more than a dozen of these online writing communities. Start with two of the largest ones: FanFiction and Archive of Our Own."
    • Fanworks aren't just inspiring viewers and fans but future academics. Mass Live highlighted the accomplishment of a local student who is a recipient of the "prestigious Marshall Scholarship for study in United Kingdom." Student Tess Grogan is "interested in instances of transgressive violence in children’s and young adult literature as well as alternative systems of justice and responses to this violence. She is interested in the implications of 'genderswap' fan fiction – pieces written by fans of books or television that reverse the genders of the primary characters."

    What sources have you seen as fanwork inspiration? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Commercial Exploits

    By Kiri Van Santen on Pátek, 23 January 2015 - 5:27 odpoledne
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    banner by caitie of a monopoly hundred with the OTW logo and the title of this post

    • Many fans of Fall Out Boy launched a petition to protest a proposed event by podcaster Jensen Karp which would revolve around reading "the most ridiculous REAL fanfiction about them on the web." The event was later cancelled though it remained unclear how much participation the band itself had had in the plans.
    • The use of fans' work by third parties was less clear in an announcement by YouTube gamer PewDiePie who launched a fanfic contest with himself as the subject, noting that "The contest will be sponsored by Mountain Dew." Three finalists would have their story submission turned into an animated video. The Terms and Conditions of the contest noted that aside from transferring the rights to all entries (whether they were winners or not) to "Sponsor, Administrator and their agents along with PewDiePie" that the fanworks "must not denegrate the subject, Mountain Dew brand, product and/or trademark."
    • At the American Library Association's District Dispatch, Carrie Russell bemoaned the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act process that also forces OTW Legal to repeatedly defend the exemptions it won for fan video makers in 2009 and 2012. "Here’s the problem: Sometimes DRM gets in the way of actions that are not infringements of copyright. Let’s say you have lawful access to an e-book (you bought the book, fair and square), but you are a person with a print disability, and you need to circumvent to enable text-to-speech (TTS) functionality which has been disabled by DRM. This is a violation of the circumvention provision. One would think that this kind of circumvention is reasonable, because it simply entails making a book accessible to the person that purchased it." Russell called for the exemptions to be made permanent and eliminate the months of time spent by petitioners and government alike.
    • An article in The Guardian highlighted the various benefits of new technology in expanding what producers and consumers are able to exchange (even if fans had long been there first). "The rise of these electronic devices built only for reading has been a boon to the books sector. The transition to digital reading brought with it a new kind of publishing that was distinctly more experimental, energetic and (nakedly) commercial than that which preceded it. Just this week the publisher Little, Brown began publishing ebook shorts based on the hugely successful Broadchurch TV series that are made available to download in the hours after each show."

    How have you seen fans' work adopted and co-opted? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fannish Acceptance

    By Janita Burgess on Úterý, 13 January 2015 - 5:27 odpoledne
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    banner with text only that reads OTW Fannews Fannish Acceptance

    • At Bustle Emma Lord explained why Everyone Should Date Someone Who is Into Fanfiction. "I learned something about fanfiction: It isn’t a hindrance to me being in a relationship at all. In fact, it has become a whole new facet of myself that I finally got the opportunity to share with someone, and I was surprised once I found someone who was curious about it that I had a lot to say. I would argue that in general, being a rampant fanfiction junkie makes you even more desirable in a relationship, because we have so much to bring to the table."
    • Sadly, fans can't always count on one another for acceptance. In two separate cases a fan video maker and a sports fan were both bullied or criticized by their fellow fans to the point that they took their lives.
    • In other cases, stereotypes come from the media. AndPop profiled fangirls who met celebrities as if fans in their 20s are a rarity, asking "[W]hat’s it like when your interest carries over, even when you’re now a responsible and employed adult in your late 20s?" One fan pointed out that it was like any other hobby. "'I do it a lot and I go to a lot of shows, but I’m not taking off for six weeks to follow a band around the country,' Bove explains. 'To me, it’s no different than a sports team or anything like that. If somebody wants to go to every Leafs game because they have season tickets, then they go and have fun.'”
    • The Longmont Colorado Times Call profiled the Grey Havens Young Adults fan group. "The group started in October 2013 and gradually gained ground. While they are technically a book discussion group, Bosica and Cowling make a point of not limiting the conversations to the novel at hand, spawning philosophical discussion of fandoms that reach across the worlds of television, cinema, comic books, card games, tabletop games and literature." Some of the participants pointed out the strengths of the group. "'We get into deep philosophical conversations about what is good and what is bad,' said Xan Brown...Peter Larsen, 12, said that sort of deep discussion doesn't happen often in school."

    How have you seen fannishness and fandom being accepted? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Using Fans

    By Pip Janssen on Neděle, 11 January 2015 - 5:29 odpoledne
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    Title written in Star Wars style font by Bremo

    • MacWorld discussed Fancred, a new effort at a social networking site for sports fans. "The sports fan-focused social network is quietly building momentum in a quest to do for sports what LinkedIn has done for professionals. 'We think we’re building the world’s largest fan network,' said CEO Kash Razzaghi." Their strategy involves turning fans into marketing pros. "[T]he platform is also targeting college campuses in a strategy that cribs liberally from the playbook of popular messaging apps. Fancred offers college internships to students who want to be the app’s brand ambassadors... Gaining users on campus will translate to professional growth."
    • Some other sites are cribbing more than fans' time for their projects. Rocket News 24 pointed out how a Nintendo character montage included a fan's artwork. "With over 12 million members and billions of page views per day, Japanese art submission site Pixiv is submitted to by up-and-coming creatives the world over, making it one of the best places for people to showcase their work and get noticed. While few artists have a problem with their work being featured or embedded on other sites–indeed, with proper citation many are glad of the free publicity–Pixiv’s terms of use make it explicitly clear that users should not take or insert a featured artist’s work in another product without prior permission."
    • Meanwhile Fashion & Style speculated that the new Star Wars film would include a fan-created character. "Another name on the list is Captain Phasma, a character who, as SK points out, has only appeared in a fanfic called "Tarkin's Fist". Despite the limited information about the role, /Film, who picked up the story earlier this week, speculates that Gwendoline Christie is a strong contender for the part."
    • The Hollywood Reporter discussed Paramount's use of Wattpad to promote the film Project Almanac. "Wattpad's 35 million users, read, write and engage with stories uploaded online, including a fair amount of fan fiction. The platform...is particularly popular among young women and previously partnered with films like Fox's The Fault in Our Stars, Universal's The Purge: Anarchy and Ouija and three Relativity titles: last year's Romeo and Juliet, Best of Me and Beyond the Lights... 'We have been watching Wattpad for quite some time and think it's a really exciting and new emerging online social destination, not only for young adult book fans to discover and share stories, but beyond that, it's becoming a kind of a hub and influencer-type community, and something that's been bubbling up in terms of social platforms,' Paramount's senior vp, interactive marketing Megan Wahtera tells THR."

    How have you seen fans being used for commercial projects? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Book Fandom End to End

    By Please leave a name on Pátek, 9 January 2015 - 5:34 odpoledne
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    • At The New Statesman, Elizabeth Minkel discussed book fandoms and the importance of small presses. "The fan who gets hired to make the thing he’s obsessed with has its own TV Trope: 'the promoted fanboy'...But that trend feels more absent in female fandom: it’s easier for me to find examples of women who’ve gently distanced themselves from their fan communities as they worked towards mainstream success – hardly unsurprising, given the publishing industry’s historical antipathy towards fan fiction, the largely female-dominated practice that lies at the heart of a lot of women’s fan experiences, combined with the media’s continued less-than-flattering portrayal of fangirls."
    • Minkel as well as Hypable and many others reported on Rainbow Rowell's next book release, a Fangirl spinoff focused on the fictional fanfic in the story. "Rowell will open up Cath’s fanfiction for all the world to enjoy! Her latest book, due out in October of 2015, will be appropriately titled, Carry On. Even without the source material, we can bet that fans will be lining up to get their hands on the novel based on the fanfiction based on the fake novel within a real novel. (That must be some kind of new genre!)" Sorry, but fans have been there for a while.
    • OTW's ally organization, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, posted about a recent US federal court case allowing the sharing of information on stripping out DRM from ebooks. "When Abbey House shut down the ebook store in 2013, it gave its customers a month's notice that they would no longer be able to add new devices to read their purchased books on—and also explained that some customers were using the free software package Calibre to remove the DRM so they would be able to move their library to new hardware." They note that it puts the burden on users and the organizations that advocate for them, such as the OTW, to "continue with the triennial rulemaking process seeking exemptions to the anti-circumvention provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. There, we are pointing to non-infringing uses that are nevertheless hampered by the presence of DRM software and the legal backing that supports it."
    • The Kansas City Star interviewed Wattpad users who were more interested in writing rather than book deals. "Ramya Chilappa, an eighth-grader at Leawood Middle School, likes to read fan fiction of Harry Potter and Naruto, the manga series, on her phone. She says the comments she’s received about her writing were constructive. 'Things like ‘this part feels rushed’ and ‘maybe you’ve started too many sentences the same way... Then they throw in a compliment. They know what it’s like.'... While text is the chief medium, some Wattpadders go multimedia creating book cover images — there’s an art library to tap — as well as embedding story soundtracks and offering YouTube trailers."

    How have you seen book fandoms adapting over the years? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Learning from Fanfic

    By Kiri Van Santen on Úterý, 6 January 2015 - 5:58 odpoledne
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    graphic by Ania of a woman reading a book with AO3 open on her computer

    • Technology Tell looked at what fanfiction told them about character popularity in Dragon Age. "The proof is in the sorting. I started my search over at An Archive of Our Own. It has a section set aside for Dragon Age Inquisition fanfiction, and allows people to search by specific character. Cullen is the top result, appearing in 251 stories. He even beats out the main character, the female Inquisitor, as she only has 216 stories...I decided to check the internet’s other, largest repository – Fanfiction.net...it’s clear he’s still a favorite of fanfiction authors. He appears in 588 stories on the site."
    • A post at TV Over Mind instead discussed what kind of fanfiction fans of Suits were writing. "Most tend to pair up Mike Ross and Harvey Specter, seeing as they are the glue that holds Suits together in a sense; without them, the show’s not as interesting to watch as it was before given that Harvey was the one that hired Mike as his associate after being impressed by how much the young man knows about the law. However, there are other pairings as well, like Donna Paulsen and Harvey Specter, because the author wants them to be involved romantically, and since it’s not quite happening on the show just yet, writing a fictional story about it allows for fans of the show to enjoy the possibility of this development."
    • Autostraddle was one of many sites turning to fanfic recs for content. "[T]he future is now and fandom is mainstream and queer women who love pop culture are changing the shape of the world! Part of it is writing/reading fan fiction, which smashes the patriarchy in so many exciting and accessible ways... Faking It is...fun for a lot of reasons, including how the collective power of femslash fandom is what caused Glee and South of Nowhere to buck the fauxmosexual sweeps weeks tropes of yore (thanks, The O.C.!) and really delve into lady-loving relationships on-screen."
    • Rather than rec existing work, Sugarscape decided to get readers to write some. "We're looking for you lot to get as creative as possible, whether that's saliva filled snogs, lustful glances or villainous characters (Ashton Irwin dressed as the Grinch anyone?), so keep it original and feel free to bring in any celebs you fancy. The idea is that every day when the story is updates, you'll have the chance to add the next paragraph all over again and by Sunday 21st December, we'll have the full fan fiction."

    What have you learned from fanfiction? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Troubling Issues

    By Claudia Rebaza on Neděle, 4 January 2015 - 5:42 odpoledne
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    Banner by Alice of male and female figures under the post title Troubling Issues.

    • At Alternative Press, Cassie Whitt brought an adult's perspective to the issue of why female interests are denigrated. "[T]hat girl is told she’s 'everything that’s wrong with music these days' because self-perceived rock ’n’ roll crusaders need to defend music from the evil powers that, you know, actually put their energy, time and money into (gasp) actually keeping the music world alive. And demonizing fangirls is not an issue that solely harms female fans. A male friend recently confided to me, 'Man, I love My Chemical Romance, but I almost feel like I have to defend that as a 20-something man' because of the perception of their fanbase. Because we live in a society where we’ve taught men it’s not okay to like things that young girls do, where they have to explain or completely conceal their own passions. A fangirl’s devotion is the precise kind of fervor that can't be taught. It's the thing that puts them at the front row of shows now, and later in life, will put them anywhere else, doing anything they want to do."
    • At First Showing, Patrick Campbell examined the state of movie fandom. "[H]ow did we end up in this snarky, sad, and frustrating state of film fandom that we're in now? I believe there are a few explanations, to this problem, and it's ones we really need to look into ourselves to try and fix... I believe many have lost the wide-eyed wonderment that it takes to love movies. The cynical nature seems to be coming from a loss of an inner child for many... There seems to be an obsession with making things realistic in film, especially post Christopher Nolan's Batman series, but not all films need to play by that. Every movie has its own set of rules, and what may work in the film may not happen in real life, but that's the point. It's good to retain your childlike nature sometimes, and take films in that way."
    • The Fandom Post discussed arguments surrounding dubtitles. "[I]n the end, what sucks about dubtitles is that people keep using them as an excuse to not buy licensed releases because they want to play to this belief that everything is dubtitled, or that subs are so poorly done that everything is just rotten to the core. Having quite a few friends that translate both manga and anime and seeing and hearing the horror stories of accusations, and looking at the process of how it’s done, it’s beyond a flimsy excuse. That, my friends, is the bad in all of those."
    • Medical Daily discussed reports of a chemical attack on a hotel hosting a furry convention. "Nineteen people needed to be transported to nearby hospitals with symptoms consistent with chemical exposure such as nausea, dizziness, and other medical problems." Author Dana Dovey added, "When a group faces violent, prejudice motivated crime because of his or her perceived membership in a certain social group, this is considered to be a hate crime. Based on the initial review of this weekend’s FurFest incident, police are not ruling this out as a possibility. A criminal investigation has been opened."

    What troubling issues have you seen in fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Developing a Clue

    By Kiri Van Santen on Úterý, 30 December 2014 - 5:50 odpoledne
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    graphic by Sidhrat of a road swooping into the sky

    • Gamasutra featured a post by James Cox that discussed his struggle to define fanfiction. "Even bad Mary Sue fan fiction has its place. Have you ever read My Immortal?... I read the whole thing once as an endurance test. It’s atrocious, but enjoyably so. Almost like a masochistic fun. After all of this, my new definition of fan fiction is as follows: Fan fiction is a thing that some people do; it usually involves being inspired by another’s work. Some fan fiction is good. Some is bad. That’s about as in depth as I can go right now with my definition. Fan fiction became such a blanket term: how some fan fiction became so successful, how creative people can write it, how it’s hard to tell if a work is a fan fiction or if it just draws on the lore of another work. Is Tolkien just fan fiction of Anglo-Saxon and Norse mythology?"
    • While a lot of people seem to struggle with the definition of fanfiction, other sites seem to be particularly clueless when it comes to fandom activities. For example, in an article on Lost Remote the author discusses the site Moviepilot which gives some contributors to its writing platform extra perks for particular content. The author concludes "Not only is it worth knowing who your fans are, the platform works because it’s authentic: fans talking to fans without any pretense. Where else can one be really, really, sad about “The Walking Dead” winter finale or gush over “Doctor Who” donuts?"
    • Moviepilot's hardly alone in wanting to monetize fan activities. In a Guardian blogpost, Victoria James suggested Amazon wants to take on Wattpad as the premiere site for amateur writers. "The internet shopping site has just launched its own social reading and writing platform, Kindle WriteOn, a move characterised by Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian as 'trying to eat [Wattpad’s] lunch'." There is already a space for fanfic but "[s]o far the fan fiction category appears unloved – “0 reads 0 likes 0 follows 0 comments” is the pitiless tally of a bowtie-themed “crossover” between Dr Who and the Thor movieverse. Perhaps the invitations haven’t yet reached fan fiction fans, or maybe the problem is the space Amazon built for fanfic writers last year: Kindle Worlds."
    • Even people in fandom can use tips sometimes, highlighted by a post in Podfic Tips offering ways to comment about podfic. "One of the topics that caught my attention through this year's pod-aware was feedback, and having tools to leave feedback. Sometimes, especially if we're more used to leaving comments on other types of fanworks or if like me the Fandom Language (often: English) isn't the language we're most comfortable with, we're at a loss for words. As such, when leaving comments on podfics, or when reccing podfics, I like to build myself a little vocabulary list. Here's my lists of what I often comment on and what words I choose from, in case it might help others."

    What fandom definitions and practices do you know about? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Small Scale Fandom

    By Janita Burgess on Čtvrtek, 18 December 2014 - 6:34 odpoledne
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    Banner by Rachel of a generic Newspaper banner with the OTW logo and the words OTW Fannews

    • The Baker Orange featured a campus fangirl who discussed her fannish history. "Although she chooses to forget about her fangirling over the Twilight series, she says it was the show that 'started it all.' When she went to the midnight premier for the first movie, the atmosphere of the event really turned her on to the idea of being a fangirl. 'It was a bunch of fans getting together. I think thats what made it so much fun because everybody was there because they wanted to see the movie the second it came out... Then I realized that there were fandoms for tv shows and books, all the fun stuff... It’s really easy to get so involved with it when your on social media. It makes it a lot easier to freak out with people who understand."
    • Wisconsin Public Radio's Central Time show featured a fanfiction discussion in which a few guests and callers discussed being fanfic writers. Asked if there were interactions with her readers one writer said, "There is and sometimes it's not always an equivalent exchange, because once you post something it's out there whether or not you want critique or commentary, once it's out there you're going to get that critique. If it's something where I'm working with someone because I do co-write with a friend, we do a lot of give and take. Or I may post a snippet and say "I'm stuck with this idea...if you were writing this what would you do?" (No transcript available).
    • ZeeNews India was among several sites discussing an upcoming documentary on Rajinikanth fans. Said co-producer Rinku Kalsy, "Joyjeet Pal...who is also the producer of the documentary, used to tell me how small kids in Rajini's state are affected by his stardom... They aspire to be like his characters portrayed in the film. How they look up to Rajini and parents are also happy with their children's decision of becoming like him. So, we thought we should explore this further."
    • AV Club wrote about a Super Heroes vs. Game Heroes video on YouTube. "It’s essentially a fan film with deeply committed cosplayers mixing it up and uttering various catchphrases or obvious dialogue for their characters, but the clever conceits (one of the Minecraft bricks being the Tesseract, dimension jumping, and the resolution of the fight) elevate it beyond most fan creations. The special effects are especially impressive for this short film, with many aspects of the games and movie versions of these characters being perfectly replicated by a much smaller studio."

    What details about fandom make it personal for you? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Profiles in Marketing

    By Claudia Rebaza on Neděle, 14 December 2014 - 6:32 odpoledne
    Message type:

    Banner by Erin of Barbie working at a computer with the OTW logo on it, with two adults looking on in the background. The banner reads 'OTW Fannews: Profiles in Marketing'.

    • An increasing number of companies are marketing toward girls and women in tech, but not every attempt to capitalise on the trend is well-executed. NPR covered widespread criticism of Mattel's Barbie: I Can Be A Computer Engineer. “‘It starts so promising; Barbie is designing a game to show kids how computers work,’ said Ribon. […] Brian and Steven take over — and, at the end of the day, Barbie takes credit for the boys' work.” OTW Legal staffer Casey Fiesler, whose feminist remix went viral and was featured in the NPR story, took to her own blog to explain why non-commercial remix is allowed under US copyright law. "It is so amazing how many people care about representation of women in computing, and I’m thrilled and humbled that something I created helped to expand this conversation. I wrote a piece for Slate about the process and the ideas behind Barbie, Remixed, but something I wanted to discuss in more detail was the act of remix itself rather than the critique behind it."
    • TribLIVE reported on a new TV network focused on fandom. "When Pop, a cable network most people probably refer to as TVGN, launches Jan. 14, it will do so with programs that celebrate the continuing ability of such, well, institutions, as New Kids On the Block and 'Everybody Loves Raymond' to cut a swath through popular culture."
    • UK site YouGov researches audiences to determine the characteristics of people with particular interests or fandoms. By using their profiler you could discover that Good Omens fans are more likely to be 40-59 year old males who work in IT, are left leading when it comes to politics, and also are fans of John Barrowman, Stephen Fry, James May, Nathan Fillion and Patrick Moore.
    • The publishing industry is among those wanting to target fans, and a recent conference on the children's book trade included a panel on fanfiction. Meanwhile Wikia is declaring itself "the ultimate source for powerful and relevant pop culture, entertainment and game expertise" and is producing a video series on fandom in 2014 along with Disney's Maker Studios. The idea is to create amateur/professional partnerships. "The partnership has already resulted in some quirky combinations, including one pairing of a devotee of the AMC period drama Mad Men with the creator of the Drinks Made Easy YouTube channel. 'We hope to continue to define projects that allow for creators and super fans to come together and be in the spotlight.'"

    What marketing efforts utilizing fans have you spotted? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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