Sbírka odkazů

  • OTW Fannews: Fan activism

    By Claudia Rebaza on Středa, 14 May 2014 - 4:57 odpoledne
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    Banner by dogtagsandsmut of a black and white photo of protesters holdings signs along with images of peace sign, a heart, and an open book.

    • Indiewire hosted a post about a petition to the MTV Awards. The "Heroes" category overlooked an obvious candidate. "[I]t's still noteworthy that among MTV's 16 categories, the only other group without any female nominees is Best Male Performance. Katniss' exclusion, then, doesn't make sense from either a commercial point of view -- The Hunger Games was the highest-grossing film of 2013 -- or from a J. Law one, since the Oscar winner is nominated in four other categories...The character of Katniss is enough of a cultural touchstone that she appeared in one of the 'Heroes' montages at this year's Oscars, so MTV definitely done goofed."
    • A planned webseries on artists' rights seeks to educate viewers about copyright, the internet and creativity. "CopyMe is "an infographic-style animated webseries that deals with our modern attitude to copying. It assembles the most relevant information and makes it accessible to everyone" so that it "will appeal both to copyright literates, as well as to those with no previous knowledge on these topics. Our biggest goal is to raise awareness and highlight our concerns regarding the copyright realities of today."
    • A Wall Street Journal article about L.J. Smith quoted current and former OTW staffers, Heidi Tandy and Francesca Coppa. "'It feels like a land grab,' said Francesca Coppa...'Big companies are trying to insert themselves explicitly to get people who don't know any better to sign away rights to things that might be profitable.'" Indeed, the article notes that "Ms. Smith says that when she began publishing her Vampire Diaries fan fiction on Amazon this past January, she wasn't aware that she was giving up the copyright to those stories, too. Nor did she realize she'd be giving Alloy a cut of earnings from the new stories."
    • One of our favorite pieces of activism this week is a little biased. White Collar Vids created a vidlet for the OTW's October membership drive in 2012 -- take a look!

    What examples of fan activism have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom risks

    By Claudia Rebaza on Neděle, 11 May 2014 - 3:22 odpoledne
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    • A variety of articles derived from an Anhui TV segment reported that 20 women writing slash fiction were arrested in China as part of an effort to "create a healthy cyberspace." As The Diplomat pointed out though, the purge was very narrowly targeted. "Indeed, if the various crackdowns in the past were actually aimed at porn, it’s hard to understand how some of the largest porn sites have somehow slipped through the cracks. If you want to read reports from Amnesty International or the New York Times in China, you are bang out of luck unless you have a VPN. Still, the glorious proletariat can look at Porn.com until they’re blue in the face."
    • Anuradha Lingappa wrote in the Whitman College Pioneer about sexual assaults in Harry Potter fandom. "The recent accusations mirror an incident a couple years ago when an Internet-famous musician who wrote songs about similarly 'nerdy' topics was arrested on several counts of child pornography. He pled guilty to soliciting sexually explicit content from underage fans. He moved in the same circles as some of the men who are currently accused, even accompanying their bands on tour. The response to his arrest was disappointing. No one wanted to talk about it. If there had been serious discussion about preventing sexual violence within fandoms, maybe things wouldn’t have gotten so far."
    • Author N.K. Jemisin discussed confirmation bias. "Confirmation bias doesn’t cause the phenomenon of Mysteriously Whitewashed Medieval Europe. (Or Peculiarly Denuded of Women Europe, or Puzzlingly Focused On The Nobility Europe, or any of the other bizarre things we tend to see in medieval Europe-flavored fantasy.) Confirmation bias causes the freakouts that occur whenever somebody points out these phenomena, and names them as inaccuracies. Like the 'go kill yourself' messages Medieval PoC has gotten for simply pointing out that people of color could easily have been present in a game set in central Bohemia."

    What examples of fandom risks have you seen? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in an OTW Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Gendered fandom friction

    By Claudia Rebaza on Pátek, 9 May 2014 - 4:27 odpoledne
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    Banner by Erin of characters from My Little Pony facing off against one another.

    • At Antenna, Myles McNutt argued for the need to focus on male fandom. "Blue Mountain State has connected with young audiences outside of the metrics and discourses most easily visible and counted within the television industry." By this, McNutt means that "the vast majority of the Kickstarter contributors—over 3,200 as of April 16th—are male. This matches the series’ demographic appeals...but diverges from how we typically imagine fan engagement...we rarely consider those audiences as the type of fans who would go so far as to pay to see a series resurrected. That kind of organized fandom has more commonly been associated with women, as part of a broader feminization of fan culture—over half of the Veronica Mars kickstarter backers were women, for instance, despite the fact that Kickstarter’s membership is predominantly male."
    • While the advantages of gender-balanced fandoms are obvious to some marketers, researcher CarrieLynn D. Reinhard discusses fractured fandoms. "This project explores the tensions in the fan discourse surrounding the My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic movie Equestria Girls. Producer Hasbro operates an official Facebook page for My Little Pony that was used to market the movie. With each post, fans’ comments demonstrate the tensions within the fandom and to this film. These tensions demonstrate the range of subsets of the fandom due to its cross-gendered and cross-generational nature. The discourse and resulting fractured fandom highlights the issue of 'appropriateness' in reception of children’s programming."
    • Megan Farnel wrote about gendered disputes in Sherlock fandom. "[I]t’s not like the argument that Moffat is more than a tad sexist is a new one, or anything, but I find the form it takes here particularly compelling. Does he truly think he’s fooling anyone by saying that an episode involving a scene that so clearly mocks slash-fiction writers, calling them 'out of their mind' and arguing they are not 'serious' enough, comes to us from the ACD canon?" Instead "I think a lot of it comes down to labour and gender. This move on Moffat’s part at once allows him to use the canon of the show to respond to the fans he deems not ‘serious’ enough, while also deeming their engagements with the show as any meaningful form of labour worth forming a dialogue with."
    • Of course, sometimes gendered friction can be quite local when, as Toronto Life published, discovering your spouse's explicit fanfiction. "What to do depends largely on where you found it. If the pages were tucked away in a drawer, buy her some sexy lingerie, then rise to the occasion, but don’t mention your discovery. If she left the story open on the kitchen table, take it as an invitation to discuss her rather specific sexual pinings. Be open, accepting and prepared to spice things up in the bedroom (or bathroom or kitchen)."

    What examples of gendered fandom friction have you seen? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom love & hate

    By Claudia Rebaza on Středa, 7 May 2014 - 6:01 odpoledne
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    • At New Statesman, Elizabeth Minkel discussed tension between fans and content creators. "[M]aybe it’s best to think of fan/creator relations through the lens of 'mutually assured destruction', in the sense that 'they’re allowing me to do what I want, so I’ll enable them through what they want'. Just because we can see each other – and just because we can potentially even talk to each other – doesn’t mean it’s actually a good deal to directly engage with each other...social media continues to transform the way we communicate...it’s not the historical barriers in place, but perhaps instead the ones we continue to erect, out of mutual respect, that help to keep making television worth getting invested in."
    • The Columbia Chronicle looked instead at fan vs. fan. "In 2006, Grieve and a colleague conducted a study to measure how fans view opposing teams and found that when the home team lost, fans were more likely to deem visiting fans unfriendly, rude and untrustworthy than when the home team won. Fans sometimes take their negative attitudes toward rival groups too far, Grieve said, adding that some are emotionally attached to a team simply because they enjoy the confrontational nature of fandom rather than the camaraderie and socialization benefits."
    • Lizzie Yin wrote in The Global Times about how she was an anti-fan. " I'll admit that I once used to like some of my targets. From my perspective, many of the anti-fans out there have a history like me. They used to like somebody or some band, then they grew out of it, and felt embarrassed or ashamed of that past history, since they later found those people 'uncool.' Exactly like the fans, the anti-fans also spend a great amount of time, energy and resources in hating somebody, passionately."
    • At Geek Tyrant, Mick Joest complained about tests of fannishness. "[G]eeks have evolved into something well beyond the current umbrella we share. Table-top gamers may have no interest in Firefly, and the Browncoats could not give a flip less about Manga readers. PC gamers may log 100s of hours in DOTA and never watch an actual episode of the original Star Trek, and that's completely fine. It doesn't make you more or less of geek to have your hands in multiple cookie jars of fandom, and it's that kind of pissing contest of 'who's more popular' that drove many people into the less mainstream interests we share today. "

    What examples of fandom love & hate have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Where fandom's going

    By Claudia Rebaza on Úterý, 6 May 2014 - 6:01 odpoledne
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    Banner by Sidhrat of a road in the desert stretching into the distance.

    • The San Jose Mercury News wrote about the Quidditch World Cup. "The founder of San Jose State University's quidditch team has no doubts that in another decade or so, her beloved broom-riding, ball-chucking game that was ripped from the pages of boy-wizard fiction will be an Olympic event." However, as its athletic appeal grows, many want to detach it from its origins. "'You'll see people get into it who are really socially awkward, fan-fiction writing nerds, and they'll be at practice along with lacrosse players...It's a really diverse group...I get it, I see why people would want to distance the sport from that,' she said. 'But that would be abandoning our roots.'"
    • However, fandom has been at the start of many things, including the World Wide Web. In a look back, Engadget profiled the experiences of early users. While one contributor discussed game forums and Gone With the Wind fanfiction, another talked about creating fansites. "When one of my favorite comics at the time, Cyberella (which was a sort of Max Headroom-meets-Disney cyberpunk tale), got canceled in 1997, I made a fansite for it complete with timeline and FAQ page. The latter of which got me a slightly annoyed letter from the comic's artist, Don Cameron, pointing out an error. It was the first letter I'd gotten from a creator about my sites, but not the last."
    • The fact that both of the Engagdget contributors discussing fandom were women should be unsurprising. In an interview with Sequential Tart, fan studies author Anne Jamison discussed the gendering of fanwork creation. "A lot of people write fanfiction because they see fanfiction they don't think is good and then think, 'Well hey, I could do better than that.' I think women are more culturally conditioned to accept that their work will be unpaid, that their creative activities are hobbies and 'just' hobbies. They may also be more culturally conditioned to enjoy a lot of process and interaction, more communal activity (at least in some cultures, very broadly speaking). I also believe it's changing very fast now. As the stigma lifts and there are more opportunities to profit from fic-like activities, I predict we'll see more men."
    • Although Buzzfeed never uses the word "fandom", they discuss how the cruise industry is focusing on fannish interests. "In recent years, cruises organized around rock bands have become a popular and successful way to attract a younger demographic. Not unlike Coachella, Bonnaroo, or other land-based music festivals, people don’t seem to mind being in a captive environment if it means drinking beer, listening to music, and meeting their rock idols." There are already "cruises around Bravo’s Top Chef and the NFL’s New England Patriots. The company has also struck partnerships with the Oscars, Olympics, Tony awards, Dreamworks Animation, and others."

    What fandom movements have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Where fanfic is (and isn't) going

    By Claudia Rebaza on Pátek, 2 May 2014 - 5:22 odpoledne
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    Banner by Lisa of arrows going in multiple directions

    • GeekGirls in Finland hosted a post called Fanfiction goes Korea. "Korean fanfiction comes in two distinguishable types, if I may. There is type A, which (sort of sadly) dominates the whole genre by featuring the readers, themselves, as the main character. The stories are told from the point of view of the reader: these are called “you fanfiction” or “self-insert fanfiction”, and feature the reader’s “character” somehow ending up meeting (and falling for) the idol character. The storyline tends to be the same: you are a young woman who meets the idol character, and through telenovela-like events you fall in love with them...The Asian fanfiction site has, in fact, developed a code to use for these stories, where a certain word (for example, “you”) will change to the reader’s username when viewed."
    • Many media outlets reported on another One Direction fanfic going pro, only this one was going to the movies. "Agencies usually rep works from traditional publishers, but the priority in Hollywood is to find rabid followings that warrant screen adaptations. For Wattpad, After is the closest thing the site has experienced to Fifty Shades Of Grey...Writers don’t get paid by Wattpad, but they retain copyright ownership of the chapters they publish...It’s the first time Wattpad has become involved in the attempt to set one of its contributors in a deal like this. It is likely UTA will steer future Wattpad titles into the marketplace."
    • Some Harry Potter fans, meanwhile, are headed to Hogwarts. "Hogwarts Is Here is a free, nine-week course available to "all aspiring witches and wizards." Users can receive that long-awaited acceptance letter, download textbooks and start working through all seven years of schooling, replete with professors, homework and quizzes...Incredibly, the online Hogwarts is entirely managed by volunteers. The site's editorial content, the design; all of it. 'Our goal is to create the magical experience that we as fans have all been looking for since we finished the last book,' the site's disclaimer reads.'"
    • Author Claire Simpson discussed fanfic's preoccupation with perfect sex. "There was a big push a couple of years ago in fanfic communities for writers to start including contraception in their sex scenes. This was not only to encourage a more sensible attitude towards sex in fanfic readers – many of whom are younger females – but also to show a more realistic side of sex rather than present and unattainable ideal...But there was still the other issues around sex that weren’t being addressed – when sex isn’t nice, when it’s not slow and loving, when it’s awkward, inexperienced, sore or when the characters just don’t know what to say to each other before or after. When the sex seems to make everything worse."

    What changes (or lack thereof) have you seen in fanfic? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in an OTW Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fans taking the reins

    By Claudia Rebaza on Středa, 30 April 2014 - 5:32 odpoledne
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    Banner by James of a silhouetted horse and rider walking down an incline

    • Den of Geek wrote about fans stepping in to create more content. "As Star Wars fandom continued, fans became content creators too...Pablo Hidalgo wrote and illustrated Star Wars tabletops games before he was hired. Martha Wells...wrote fan fiction before she signed on to pen a novel about Princess Leia." And now two groups are creating video games. "Project Black Light is an effort by fans to write Knights of the Old Republic 3, the highly-anticipated KOTOR sequel that never was" and "Another Star Wars fan game in development is BattleCry, which development team leader Cameron Spencer calls 'a spiritual successor' to Battlefront 2."
    • Provo, Utah's Daily Herald profiled Star Trek fan film creators. "It would be an understatement to say 'Star Trek Continues' wouldn't be possible without Mignogna. He produces, directs, writes, scores, edits and stars in the show. (In the closing credits he's even listed as a carpenter.) Mignogna was "fanatical" about the original series as a young boy, making 'Star Trek' videos even back then. In that way, Mignogna said, 'Star Trek Continues' was "an idea 40 years in the making."
    • Of course sometimes it's the pros who go fannish. My ModernMet showed a variety of business cards for well known fandoms by "Italian creatives Benedetto Papi and Edoardo Santamato of Invasione Creativa".
    • Billboard focused on how happy some creators can be with fan responses. "On the OWN show 'Oprah Prime',' the host played Williams a montage of fan-created YouTube videos adapted to his No. 1 Hot 100 hit 'Happy.' Following a series of videos from London, the Philippines, Iceland and more, the singer found himself in tears." He discussed the song's journey recounting "how radio stations were passing on the song until his 'Happy' clip debuted and fan-made videos began to create attention. 'It was no longer my song,' he says."

    What great fanworks have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanwork wonders

    By Claudia Rebaza on Úterý, 29 April 2014 - 3:26 odpoledne
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    Banner by dogtagsandsmut of an open book with fairy dust rising up.

    • Malaysia's New Straits Times profiled a local fan artist's work on superheroes. "[H]er drawings of Marvel Comics heroines such as She-Hulk, Rogue and the female Captain Marvel [are] in elegant gowns, drawn in art nouveau style. The illustrations are a stark contrast to the characters’ original style in the comic books which have a tendency to sexualise female characters through costumes and body language."
    • Over at io9's Observation Deck The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask's opera was recommended. It now has seven installments, the latest posted earlier this year.
    • The Daily Mail also focused on music, profiling Taylor Davis and her covers of video game music. "[H]er efforts also caught the attention of Journey's composer Austin Wintory, who asked her to be the solo violinist on the game's soundtrack, which Miss Davis described as 'an amazing experience' and 'a dream come true. Since I'm such a huge gamer myself and know the kind of impact the music can have on a gamer, it's so exciting that my performance on the soundtrack is actually a part of the gaming experience and that it might really touch someone in a positive way,' she said."
    • Bustle wrote about how season 3 of Twin Peaks "is a beautiful showcase of fandom at work, and of the capabilities of mediums like Twitter to harbor experimental fiction. This particular foray into Twitter storytelling is centered at the handle @EnterTheLodge, though it stretches out to 50+ Twin Peaks character accounts, telling the story of an imagined Season 3 for the series. They’ve just started the journey, but if you’d like to catch up on what’s gone on so far you can do so through their Storify archive. "

    What amazing fanworks have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Understanding fandom

    By Claudia Rebaza on Pondělí, 28 April 2014 - 4:12 odpoledne
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    Banner by Alice with the post title over 4 symbols - lips, an ear, a thumbs up and a sheet of paper

    • Dartmouth College's Special Collections Library profiled 19th century fanfic."After the success of Charles Dickens' "Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club" in 1837, George Reynolds took the characters on a new picaresque journey in "Pickwick Abroad: or, the Tour in France" published in monthly parts from 1837-38. Our first single-volume edition from 1839 acknowledges its debt to Mr. Dickens (or 'Boz'), but also cites a review from The Age boasting that '"Pickwick Abroad" is so well done by G. W. M. Reynolds, that we must warn Boz to look to his laurels.'"
    • The very confusion over published work and what "counts" was explored by Raizel Liebler, discussing Fanfic or Canon? "The removal of Aaron McGruder from the fourth season of the Boondocks on Cartoon Network is another recent example of the difficulty for fans to figure out what 'counts' and what doesn’t. As fans of Community (during last season), fans of Gargoyles, and fans of Gilmore Girls confronted before — does a show continue to be canon when the major creative force behind it leaves? Does whether some cultural production count as canon or fanon matter whether it is officially authorized?"
    • Melbourne's Herald Sun featured a number of photos from the collection of Tom Broadbent, who explored furry fandom. He "gained the trust of Furries in the UK and spent time capturing the lives of the people inside the suit. By day they are computer programmers, engineers, mortgage brokers and fursuit makers. By night they live a life role-playing their 'fursona' — the animal they have chosen to live as, generally in private. They communicate across internet forums and meet up at conventions, keeping one thing sacred — their human identity."
    • Lady Geek Girl wrote about the LiveJournal community Fandom Grammar. "The Fandom Grammar team is made up of fans from a variety of fandoms who have made it their mission to provide friendly grammatical instruction to the internet masses. They do this in a variety of ways. One way, as I discovered, was by answering tricky grammar and style questions about fandom subjects. Aside from my Harry Potter question, they have covered such varied topics as how to effectively write lolcat speech in fanfic and how to deal with transliteration in fandoms whose source language is not English."

    What fandom explorations have caught your interest? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Wherefore fandom?

    By Claudia Rebaza on Čtvrtek, 24 April 2014 - 6:28 odpoledne
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    Banner by Lisa of grafitti with the words

    • Kristin Bezio wrote at The Learned Fangirl about responses to a post on Anita Sarkeesian, and defended critical fandom. "This commenter clearly has no concept of how popular culture reflects and shapes society, and I’m fairly certain I’m not going to be able to convince him (presumably) that it does, since he appears to be one of those people who doesn’t realize that his opinions about the universe have been constructed by his life-long exposure to media (including games) and society. Clearly his opinions were plopped into his brain by Truth Itself."
    • Rockford College Radio's The Sports Ethicist looked at fandom paradoxes. "In her paper, 'Being a Sports Fan: Paradox and Intrinsic Value,' Prof. Gwen Bradford (Rice University) defends a view of the value of being a sports fan based on the idea that it is a good thing for fans to value the good of their team winning. This, however, seems to lead to a paradox because fans do not value the same good when their team’s opponents win. Prof. Bradford and Shawn Klein discuss the value of being a fan, this paradox, and other issues arising in fandom." (No transcript available).
    • At The Effingham Daily News, Ryan Czachorski also looked at sports fandom and changing allegiances. "[L]et’s all don all our colors and logos and apparel, and keep it at that. Most people around here can root for the Cardinals, some will root for the White Sox, and I’ll root for the Cubs until they break my spirit (ETA: May 12). And when St. Louis finishes better, don’t ask me to convert. It’s just not going to happen. I mean, come on, I have a Cubs bathing suit. We’re past the point of no return here."
    • The New York Observer wrote about the demise of a site which always cast a critical eye on culture: Television Without Pity. "See, this is what you get when you take a buyout from Bravo/NBC (as TVWoP did in 2008)—the off-chance that you’ll be unplugged, and that your death will be noted in a roundup of other sites, like DailyCandy, which are also being taken offline by your parent company. We cannot overstate the importance of the site that spawned Tara Ariano and all of Previously.TV—it was the site all of my friends and I would read in college to find out about Battlestar and Buffy."

    What critical fandom posts have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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