Music

  • OTW Fannews: Commercial Exploits

    By Kiri Van Santen on Pátek, 23 January 2015 - 5:27 odpoledne
    Message type:

    banner by caitie of a monopoly hundred with the OTW logo and the title of this post

    • Many fans of Fall Out Boy launched a petition to protest a proposed event by podcaster Jensen Karp which would revolve around reading "the most ridiculous REAL fanfiction about them on the web." The event was later cancelled though it remained unclear how much participation the band itself had had in the plans.
    • The use of fans' work by third parties was less clear in an announcement by YouTube gamer PewDiePie who launched a fanfic contest with himself as the subject, noting that "The contest will be sponsored by Mountain Dew." Three finalists would have their story submission turned into an animated video. The Terms and Conditions of the contest noted that aside from transferring the rights to all entries (whether they were winners or not) to "Sponsor, Administrator and their agents along with PewDiePie" that the fanworks "must not denegrate the subject, Mountain Dew brand, product and/or trademark."
    • At the American Library Association's District Dispatch, Carrie Russell bemoaned the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act process that also forces OTW Legal to repeatedly defend the exemptions it won for fan video makers in 2009 and 2012. "Here’s the problem: Sometimes DRM gets in the way of actions that are not infringements of copyright. Let’s say you have lawful access to an e-book (you bought the book, fair and square), but you are a person with a print disability, and you need to circumvent to enable text-to-speech (TTS) functionality which has been disabled by DRM. This is a violation of the circumvention provision. One would think that this kind of circumvention is reasonable, because it simply entails making a book accessible to the person that purchased it." Russell called for the exemptions to be made permanent and eliminate the months of time spent by petitioners and government alike.
    • An article in The Guardian highlighted the various benefits of new technology in expanding what producers and consumers are able to exchange (even if fans had long been there first). "The rise of these electronic devices built only for reading has been a boon to the books sector. The transition to digital reading brought with it a new kind of publishing that was distinctly more experimental, energetic and (nakedly) commercial than that which preceded it. Just this week the publisher Little, Brown began publishing ebook shorts based on the hugely successful Broadchurch TV series that are made available to download in the hours after each show."

    How have you seen fans' work adopted and co-opted? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fannish Acceptance

    By Janita Burgess on Úterý, 13 January 2015 - 5:27 odpoledne
    Message type:

    banner with text only that reads OTW Fannews Fannish Acceptance

    • At Bustle Emma Lord explained why Everyone Should Date Someone Who is Into Fanfiction. "I learned something about fanfiction: It isn’t a hindrance to me being in a relationship at all. In fact, it has become a whole new facet of myself that I finally got the opportunity to share with someone, and I was surprised once I found someone who was curious about it that I had a lot to say. I would argue that in general, being a rampant fanfiction junkie makes you even more desirable in a relationship, because we have so much to bring to the table."
    • Sadly, fans can't always count on one another for acceptance. In two separate cases a fan video maker and a sports fan were both bullied or criticized by their fellow fans to the point that they took their lives.
    • In other cases, stereotypes come from the media. AndPop profiled fangirls who met celebrities as if fans in their 20s are a rarity, asking "[W]hat’s it like when your interest carries over, even when you’re now a responsible and employed adult in your late 20s?" One fan pointed out that it was like any other hobby. "'I do it a lot and I go to a lot of shows, but I’m not taking off for six weeks to follow a band around the country,' Bove explains. 'To me, it’s no different than a sports team or anything like that. If somebody wants to go to every Leafs game because they have season tickets, then they go and have fun.'”
    • The Longmont Colorado Times Call profiled the Grey Havens Young Adults fan group. "The group started in October 2013 and gradually gained ground. While they are technically a book discussion group, Bosica and Cowling make a point of not limiting the conversations to the novel at hand, spawning philosophical discussion of fandoms that reach across the worlds of television, cinema, comic books, card games, tabletop games and literature." Some of the participants pointed out the strengths of the group. "'We get into deep philosophical conversations about what is good and what is bad,' said Xan Brown...Peter Larsen, 12, said that sort of deep discussion doesn't happen often in school."

    How have you seen fannishness and fandom being accepted? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Troubling Issues

    By Claudia Rebaza on Neděle, 4 January 2015 - 5:42 odpoledne
    Message type:

    Banner by Alice of male and female figures under the post title Troubling Issues.

    • At Alternative Press, Cassie Whitt brought an adult's perspective to the issue of why female interests are denigrated. "[T]hat girl is told she’s 'everything that’s wrong with music these days' because self-perceived rock ’n’ roll crusaders need to defend music from the evil powers that, you know, actually put their energy, time and money into (gasp) actually keeping the music world alive. And demonizing fangirls is not an issue that solely harms female fans. A male friend recently confided to me, 'Man, I love My Chemical Romance, but I almost feel like I have to defend that as a 20-something man' because of the perception of their fanbase. Because we live in a society where we’ve taught men it’s not okay to like things that young girls do, where they have to explain or completely conceal their own passions. A fangirl’s devotion is the precise kind of fervor that can't be taught. It's the thing that puts them at the front row of shows now, and later in life, will put them anywhere else, doing anything they want to do."
    • At First Showing, Patrick Campbell examined the state of movie fandom. "[H]ow did we end up in this snarky, sad, and frustrating state of film fandom that we're in now? I believe there are a few explanations, to this problem, and it's ones we really need to look into ourselves to try and fix... I believe many have lost the wide-eyed wonderment that it takes to love movies. The cynical nature seems to be coming from a loss of an inner child for many... There seems to be an obsession with making things realistic in film, especially post Christopher Nolan's Batman series, but not all films need to play by that. Every movie has its own set of rules, and what may work in the film may not happen in real life, but that's the point. It's good to retain your childlike nature sometimes, and take films in that way."
    • The Fandom Post discussed arguments surrounding dubtitles. "[I]n the end, what sucks about dubtitles is that people keep using them as an excuse to not buy licensed releases because they want to play to this belief that everything is dubtitled, or that subs are so poorly done that everything is just rotten to the core. Having quite a few friends that translate both manga and anime and seeing and hearing the horror stories of accusations, and looking at the process of how it’s done, it’s beyond a flimsy excuse. That, my friends, is the bad in all of those."
    • Medical Daily discussed reports of a chemical attack on a hotel hosting a furry convention. "Nineteen people needed to be transported to nearby hospitals with symptoms consistent with chemical exposure such as nausea, dizziness, and other medical problems." Author Dana Dovey added, "When a group faces violent, prejudice motivated crime because of his or her perceived membership in a certain social group, this is considered to be a hate crime. Based on the initial review of this weekend’s FurFest incident, police are not ruling this out as a possibility. A criminal investigation has been opened."

    What troubling issues have you seen in fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Events Calendar for January

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on Čtvrtek, 1 January 2015 - 3:00 odpoledne
    Message type:

    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup for the month of January! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Conferences, Fan Events and Fests, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • Author signups are now open for Marvel's X-Factor Big Bang, which will focus on the spinoff of the X-Men universe. Author signups continue until March 1, and artist signups open April 1.

    • IllogiCon, January 9-11 in the Raleigh-Durham area of North Carolina, is a convention "run by, and for, people who are brought together by their desire to share an interest in Science Fiction, more commonly known as Fans." Guests of honor include Jacqueline Carey, New York Times-bestselling author whose works include the Kushiel’s Legacy series and the Agent of Hel contemporary fantasy series, and Christopher J Garcia, a winner of a 2011 Hugo for Best Fanzine.

    • Founded in 1974 as the “AA Relax-I-Con” by the University of Michigan Science Fiction Club, Back to the ConFusion has been held every year since. Guests of honor include author Karen Lord, researcher Dr. Cynthia Chestek, and "gaming gurus" Monte Cook and Shanna Germain. The con is January 16-18 in Detroit, Michigan.

    • AOD 2015, January 31-February 1 in San Francisco, California, celebrates anime, video games, cartoons, and "other fun and geeky stuff." Guests of honor for this year's event are Robbie Daymond (Tuxedo Mask in Sailor Moon), Little Kuriboh (creator of YuGiOh: The Abridged Series), and voice actor Marianne Miller (Puella Magi Madoka Magica and Sword Art Online).

    Calls for Papers this month come from:

    • The Velvet Light Trap, a scholarly, peer-reviewed journal of film, television, and new media, is a collaboration between graduate students of the University of Wisconsin at Madison and The University of Texas at Austin. Issue 77, “Performance and the Body,” seeks both to advance discussions of the centrality of the body to performance studies and to encourage greater scholarly attention to performative bodies across mediums. Papers are due January 15.

    • Dialogue: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Popular Culture and Pedagogy is "an open-access online journal that explores multiple aspects of American and global popular culture and offers a scholarly examination of the broader culture in which we live, addressing relationships between literature, culture, music, technology, gender, ethnicity, and media." Papers are due January 16, and the journal will be published February 2016.

    • The Journal of Fandom Studies "offers scholars a dedicated publication that promotes current scholarship in the fields of fan and audience studies across a variety of media." Submit proposals by February 1 for the upcoming special Music and Fandom issue. Topics can include musical fan communities, popular music fandom, fans as musical producers/fan-musicians, and more.


    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • OTW Fannews: Featuring Fangirls

    By Claudia Rebaza on Neděle, 7 December 2014 - 7:32 odpoledne
    Message type:

    Banner by Robyn of multiple female symbols reading 'OMG' on pink background and saying

    • Supernatural 's 200th episode focused on fangirls. Showrunner Jeremy Carver said “'Over the past couple of years we’ve seen a real, real swing in the number of 13, 14, and 15 year old female [fans] — girl who have been watching the show — and I for one have been really struck by at Comic Con this year [how] most of our questions seemed to come from young women,' Carver said. 'And they were really funny and really smart, and they were going toe-to-toe with the boys, and we were like ‘We’ve got to give these women a platform and a voice and a point of view. It just felt like a way to give back.'”
    • Reactions to the show differed. This ranged from acknowledging the change in fangirl portrayal to pointing out how there are still gaps in their portrayal and complaints about the episode's overall message. "But in the end, that comes as pretty damn condescending. Fans – readers – are going to have their own interpretations no matter what. They’re going to imagine what their favorite characters had for breakfast, fill in the blanks that the author didn’t get in, and wonder about the possibilities, because that’s in the very nature of fiction...Virgil didn’t need Homer’s permission to write fan fiction about Aeneas, and Milton certainly didn’t ask God for permission to write a twelve-book fan fic about Satan." At least one outlet noted about Season 10 that fanfiction was giving the Demon Dean storyline a more "emotionally satisfying conclusion."
    • At Highbrow Magazine, Sandra Canosa wrote about the importance of teenybopper fangirls. "Fandom does not exist solely within a vacuum, especially in today’s Internet age. There are legions of sites, Facebook groups, and Twitter conversations that, while born out of fandom, often develop into meaningful bonding moments between girls. Belieber and Directioner forums combine threads of celebrity gossip with conversations about love, relationships, and understanding one’s own body in a communal space largely between and within other like-minded girls. By actively participating in an audience fan culture, teens can also find meaningful experiences outside the realm of the commercial machine."
    • At The Daily Californian Rosemarie Alejandrino wrote about the evolution of fangirling. "Back in the olden days — circa 2006 — there were no Twitter Q&As or follow sprees. If you wanted to interact with your favorite star, you had to wait at your desktop computer for three hours while a blog.tv livestream buffered on your Dell family computer, slurping instant noodles while popping in and out of spam-ridden chat rooms for the chance of a shout out from your favorite boyband."

    What do you think perfectly captures fangirls? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Social Media for Fans

    By Kiri Van Santen on Sobota, 15 November 2014 - 5:36 odpoledne
    Message type:
    • The Wall Street Journal wrote about different fandom activities on different social media platforms. "[T]he CW is trying just about everything in social media. Interestingly, once its fans tell the network which platform they want to use to interact with their favorite shows, the network leans in hard. 'We attack all the social media,' said Rick Haskins, the CW’s executive vice president of marketing and digital programs. 'Very, very quickly, the consumer says ‘this is the social platform we like [this particular show] on.’ When we see upticks, that’s when we move in quickly.'"
    • At The Daily Dot, S.E. Smith pointed out that not all fandoms embrace social media. "It seems to run counterintuitive to the idea that tech determines the pulse of popular culture. The NCIS website is crude and clunky, the show's Twitter is an anemic promotions vehicle, and the Internet doesn’t exactly come alive with fans livetweeting NCIS on Tuesday nights. The Internet isn’t interested in it for all the reasons that it appeals to vast numbers of viewers, illustrating that what the Internet wants from television is not necessarily what the Nielsen viewer wants."
    • The Asahi Shimbun discussed the importance of the decision to go royalty-free with vocaloid Hatsune Miku. "Developer Crypton Future Media Inc. released guidelines that acknowledge the creation of fan fictions for noncommercial purposes. To encourage collaborations between users, the company also set up Piapro, a social networking website where fans can post their songs and illustrations. 'It's meant to make creative efforts widespread without making users feel intimidated,' said Hiroyuki Ito, Crypton Future Media president."
    • Wattpad continues to pursue amateur authors and to focus on readers. In a discussion with The International Business Times, the inline commenting feature is mentioned. "This adds another dimension to the social interactions on Wattpad. With Inline Commenting, readers can comment on specific words, sentences and paragraphs of a story...Not only does Inline Commenting provide valuable and in-context feedback to writers, but it creates a new social experience for readers. It’s almost like they're reading alongside their friends and they can exclaim, commiserate, and react as the story unfolds."

    How have you seen companies developing content and features for fans? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Looking Back

    By Kiri Van Santen on Pondělí, 27 October 2014 - 4:26 odpoledne
    Message type:

    Actress Alyson Hannigan posing with her doubles from the Buffy episode Doppleganger

    • Romance writer Keira Andrews discussed how attitudes toward fandom and fan fiction have changed over the years. "Fandom was Fight Club, and we didn’t discuss it with showrunners or actors... Sometimes I really miss the days of having our own secret world, but that horse is out of the barn and galloping out of sight... I honestly think that you have to be a fan to understand fandom. Many people know about fandom now, but they’re still Muggles, if you will. Or maybe Squibs."
    • Celebuzz ranked pop music fan base names. "In the world of pop fandom, it is de rigueur to name the fan base to which you belong (or to have your chosen idol name it for you.) Over the last several years, we have seen groups with nicknames like Little Monsters, Beliebers, and Arianators grow into power and change the way we talk about musicians and their fans."
    • On PasteTV, Amy Glynn talked about how binge-watching Buffy got her through her divorce. "All I wanted was a timeout from my own reality; a break. I wasn’t expecting a breakthrough. But a Joss-curated trip back to growing up showed me some interesting stuff about adulthood. It was also the first step back to my 'real' life, or whatever was going to be real from here on out. The first time around, Buffy made me laugh. This time, it made me see."
    • Keidra Chaney of The Learned Fangirl reviewed rock critic Gina Arnold's book about the 1993 album, Exile in Guyville. "[I]t’s about the culture and mindset of the early 90′s indie rock scene in Chicago and beyond, the hyper-masculine, hyper-obsessive club dubbed 'Guyville' by Phair and others at the time. It’s also about the changes in technology and culture that have changed what it means to be a part of the indie rock scene as a performer or a fan in the past 20 years."

    What changes have you seen in your fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Interpreting Transformation

    By Kiri Van Santen on Úterý, 30 September 2014 - 3:26 odpoledne
    Message type:

    Graphic by Bremo of a gavel

    • While many identify fanworks as derivative creations, at Sequential Tart, Olwyn Supeene considered that same issue in regards to One Direction's music. "My interpretation of this, which I admit may be overly charitable, is that this is the next step on their way toward genuine and original artistic expression. They seem to be trying on different styles to see what best suits them... Like a collage or a mashup, Better Than Words repurposes existing material, compiling it to create meaning in a new context. The derivative becomes transformative."
    • A recent court case about transformative works had U.S. Circuit Courts in disagreement, although they agreed on the end result. "The court said it was 'skeptical' of the fair use approach that its sister circuit took in a 2013 copyright infringement case, Cariou v. Prince...The problem with focusing only on whether a work is transformative, the Seventh Circuit said, is that derivative works to some extent will always transform an original work...The Seventh Circuit instead focused on the four fair use factors set forth in Section 107 of the Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C. §107, saying, 'the most important [factor] usually is the fourth (market effect)'...'I don't think there is a circuit conflict,' Professor Shubha Ghosh of the University of Wisconsin Law School told Bloomberg BNA. 'Easterbrook just balances the four factors differently than what the 2nd Circuit would do.'
    • The Velveteen Rabbi looked at transformation and regeneration in relation to Dr. Who. "I doubt highly that the folks at the BBC had any notion, in 1963 when Doctor Who began, that they were creating a text which might evoke the journey of teshuvah for Jewish viewers for half a century to come. But I believe that it's our task as readers of any text (whether written or televisual) to find our own meaning in it, and that the finding of meaning is an essentially creative act. In coming to our own interpretations of what we're given, we become in a way co-creators of the text we're reading."

    What examples of transformative works are your favorites? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Caution, Advice Ahead

    By Janita Burgess on Neděle, 28 September 2014 - 4:13 odpoledne
    Message type:

    OTW Fannews Caution Advice Ahead

    • Advice columnist Prudie from Slate reassured a mother who discovered her 13-year-old daughter reading "fan fiction for a very popular all boy band which describes in explicit detail sex acts between the male band members." (One guess?) In her response, Prudie reminisced on her own illicit Playboy reading as an adolescent and suggested that the mother address the issue but understand she can't police everything. "Your discovery is the kind of thing that does call for a talk," she wrote, "but first you have to both gather yourself and find your sense of humor." She finished by speculating that "the writers of this series didn't think their most avid fans would be teenage girls!"
    • Of course, not all advice is always well understood. Writer Michelle R. Wood discussed her discovery of the OTW's mission to protect and preserve fanworks but stated, "It's important to remember that technically, all of this work is still illegal. Without authorization from the author, publisher, or studio, a fan work is still in violation of copyright." In fact, as the OTW's Legal Advocacy project often explains, fanworks are creative and transformative, which are core fair uses.
    • Then there's also advice that isn't advice at all, such as a post in The Guardian that raised the hackles of some fanfic writers. Its author later apologized, saying "Piece was meant to be quite tongue in cheek, but as we've presented it as a 'how to' that could be misleading. I know fanfic is a big universe, and people do it for all sorts of reasons, inspired by a ton of different ideas. I love that it exists and as far as I'm concerned the more people that are writing stories the better. Sorry to offend!"

    Have words of wisdom for other fanfic readers and writers? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Spotting Fanworks

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on Neděle, 21 September 2014 - 5:11 odpoledne
    Message type:

    Graphic of digital music play screen with text Spotting Fanworks
    • Business 2 Community featured fan video work in a recent post and looked at some stats. "In the past 30 days, Doctor Who has garnered 7.9 million views on YouTube with 355 videos uploaded about the show. Doctor Who also had its series 8 premiere in this window of time...By comparison, BBC’s Merlin (which has been off the air for nearly three years) had around 33 thousand views across 140 videos in the past 30 days. It is apparent that new official content drives views, but fandom still makes videos even without any new footage available. If we compare Doctor Who with smash hit Harry Potter for the past 30 days, Doctor Who still wins. But Harry Potter still has a healthy 2.8 million views across 89 videos."
    • The Asian Age looked at audio works. "In an emerging musical microtrend, fans of many such literary and cinematic fictional franchises have taken to creating and downloading 'ambient mixes' in a bid to recreate their favourite spaces and sequences from the narrative...Vasudev Rathore sees in ambient mixes a way to give your life a background score and make routine or even tedious things feel more exciting. Add to this an association with your favourite books or movies and the outcome is unparalleled. 'You can make a novel come alive by recreating its environment using ambient sounds. I have started reading Lord of The Rings and Harry Potter again with these new sound mixes in the background. It is a whole new experience.'"
    • The Hollywood Reporter's feature on the future of films included the role of fans, though it was perhaps a little behind the times in not acknowledging that fan films were already here. "The accessibility of tech makes it all possible for us to produce — and own. The intellectual property of our own tales will be ours to use and repurpose in new innovative ways. We’ll see them screened and voted upon (like The Voice), with the winners getting widespread release. It will be an entirely new business model. You've heard about Fan Fiction? Get ready for Fan Film, in which self becomes film studio."

    What fanwork features have you seen? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

Stránky

Subscribe to Music