Fanfiction

  • OTW Fannews: What's in a Name?

    By Claudia Rebaza on Torsdag, 19 November 2015 - 5:47pm
    Message type:

    Banner by Sidhrat reading 'OTW Fannews What's in a Name

    • The New Statesman weighed in on an important discussion as fanworks become more well known: what actually counts as one? "It comes down, as it often does, to money. Because money, and a lack of it, is at the heart of long-held tensions about fanworks. Fanfiction is overwhelmingly the product of unpaid labour, millions and millions of words given freely, whether for legal reasons or community norms. Because it isn’t compensated – and because it is so often done by women it is devalued, as an art form and as a way to spend one’s time. When money is added to the mix, whether in giant pull-to-publish book deals or, increasingly, fanfiction contests and authors sponsored by television networks and Hollywood studios, the place that fanworks occupy in the vast sphere of adaptation and reworking begins to shift. And not always for the better."
    • The confusion about what counts is understandable given the visibility of commercial works that either tell the stories of fans, that do similar work, or even co-opt the terms to market a product from commercial authors. What's promising is the increasing focus on available fanwork, especially when it provides a way to show audience response to a current event or topic of interest.
    • The visibility of fanworks means that its features and practices have been inspiring commercial creators and industries, whether it's to blend fanwork with their own work; to take popular genres more seriously; to respond to users' wishes about how they want to interact with stories; or to create works about them.
    • The transformative nature of fanworks is an important element in its legal protection but this is often overlooked or misunderstood by the media, even while examples of its commentary on commercial entertainment are easily found. One recent example is a fan edit focusing on Pulp Fiction and Breaking Bad. The need to educate others about what fanworks makes the effort of fans to do so all the more important.

    Do you think it's important for fans to explain their own practices and communities? That's what Fanlore is all about. Contributions are welcome from all fans so create an account there and share your knowledge.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Shouting it Out Loud

    By Claudia Rebaza on Tirsdag, 17 November 2015 - 5:34pm
    Message type:

    Banner by doughtier of a young woman in black and white shouting yelling with arms spread with the title 'Shouting it Out Loud'

    • More people are discussing the long reach of fandom into their lives. The Huffington Post spoke to the OTW and others about fanfiction and sexuality. "The opportunity to displace these risky desires, not just into pseudonymous fictions, but onto fictional characters, makes fanfic a welcoming sexual space for girls and women, where they can safely spin their more illicit fantasies off into the minds and actions of distinctly separate alter-egos. 'It made me much more comfortable in myself. More comfortable in my sexuality and going out to find other erotica and pornography without having to feel ashamed,' recalled Amy, 23, who lives in Portland and got into fan fiction early in high school. 'These are characters, but they’re also people, they do normal people things and that includes sex and other sexual activities.'”
    • The Deseret News spoke with various fans about how fandom has changed their lives. “'I started to feed back into nerd culture and all those happy feelings, basically everything that fandom gives you — not just escapism, but the immediacy of enjoying something with someone else,' Smith said. “'I realized nerdiness isn’t being happy alone, it’s about being happy with other people. Nerdiness saved me from myself.'”
    • The Salt Lake City Weekly spoke to Anne Jamison about why studying fanfic is important. "It's crucial for people who study literature to pay attention to this way in which writing is now being produced and disseminated. It's crucial for us as literature professors, because so many of our students will have read and written this way, [and have] learned to critique and engage this way—even if they sometimes won't admit it. It has had and will have an effect on published books, but it is also where we first see how digital, networked texts are changing reading and writing habits and expectations—as well as the texts themselves."
    • Certainly more people than ever are giving shoutouts to their favorite fanworks including Rainbow Rowell who when asked asked about her favorite said "I have a few. My favorite fanfiction is a Harry/Draco fanfiction and it's called The Pure and Simple Truth."

    What's been the richest part of fandom in your life? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Becoming the Norm

    By Sarah Remy on Tirsdag, 10 November 2015 - 5:16pm
    Message type:

    OTW Fannews banner blue background with cork board and the words Becoming the Norm in the foreground

    • Variety gave the entertainment industry a heads up on a critical fair use ruling in a case involving viral videos. Fair use is the key copyright provision protecting fanworks in the U.S. "'Equals Three’s use of Jukin’s videos is admittedly commercial. Nevertheless, the commercial nature of the use is outweighed by the episode’s transformativeness,' Judge Stephen V. Wilson of the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California wrote in the Oct. 13 decision. What makes the use 'transformative' is not clear-cut, the judge noted: 'Determining whether Equals Three’s episodes parody Jukin’s videos is a difficult and nuanced task.' But Judge Wilson ruled that even if Equals Three’s episodes are not parodies, the episodes comment on or criticize Jukin’s videos and are therefore allowable under fair use."
    • An article in The Atlantic discussed the importance of the Google Books decision for fair use. "This isn’t only good news for fans of Google Books. It helps makes the legal boundaries of fair use clear to other organizations who may try to take advantage of it, including libraries and non-profits. 'It gives us a better senses of where fair use lies,' says Dan Cohen, the executive director of the Digital Public Library of America." What's more "Experts say that the Supreme Court is unlikely to hear an appeal, because so many district court judges, and two different federal circuits, have found themselves so broadly in agreement about the nature of transformative use online."
    • Another writer in The Atlantic noted that transformative use is everywhere in both authorized and non-authorized forms today. "The question for authors to consider in this brave new world of mimicry, both professional and otherwise, is to what extent they consider their characters to be theirs and theirs alone. For most, it isn’t something that will become an issue during their lifetime: Copyright law stipulates that books only enter the public domain 70 years after the death of the author, even if most fanfic writers aren’t limited in terms of what they can post online."
    • Digital Book World proposed that publishing focus on the content not the wrapper when producing work. "[F]an fiction has quite possibly become the biggest sleeper hit of the digital age. According to some estimates, around a third of all the content posted on Wattpad and Tumblr is created by fans. As a commercial proposition, fan fiction is embryonic, but I think publishers have a lot to learn from its speed and agility. Fan fiction stays close to its audience (indeed, creator and consumer are often indistinguishable), it centers on recognizable brands and it iterates quickly. And most importantly, it’s platform-neutral. The wrapper—whether this is a Tumblr post, Wattpad story or ebook—isn’t the end product; it’s a means of transmission."

    What do you think have been the key moments in the spread of fanworks? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Big Business Selfies

    By Janita Burgess on Søndag, 25 October 2015 - 4:32pm
    Message type:

    OTW Fannews banner with the text Big Business Selfies against a background of stacked silver coins

    • Here and Now did a segment on how important the Twilight film had become to the economy of the town it's set in. Focusing on the 10th anniversary celebration of Twilight's publication, the segment interviews citizens of Forks, Washington and discusses the events taking place. (No transcript available)
    • At Publishing Technology the economic impact of fanfiction is in focus. "[T]he way that fan fiction takes a piece of Intellectual Property and chops it up, plays with it and distributes it over multiple networks and media...is a very pure expression of the kind of creative approach to content exploitation that we at Publishing Technology have been talking to publishers about for a very long time. The possibilities opened up by digital media mean that the book is often only the beginning of the commercial life of a piece of IP. Yet it still remains the only focus of many publishers, who find it conceptually and practically difficult to unbundle the book and sell it as chapters, or a serial, or even a content marketing campaign paid for by a brand advertiser. The book is treated as the end-product of the publishing process, when it could be just the beginning."
    • Film School Rejects discussed how fandom documentaries are becoming a form of fandom selfie. "Other than that, Ghostheads doesn’t seem to have much of a reason to exist. Like too many other fandom docs, it’s not likely to reach or be appealing to the millions of non-extreme fans let alone total outsiders. It will tell a number of hardcore Ghostbusters fans things they already know about themselves and their beloved movie...I also wouldn’t be surprised if the studios start encouraging, maybe even secretly contributing to the crowdfunding of docs that in turn foster and support fans and enthusiasm for their upcoming slates. If nothing else, they might later on be cheap pickups to throw onto their Blu-ray releases of the original or new version of their respective properties."
    • Alaska Dispatch News mapped the growth of Senshi con "from [a school] cafeteria to UAA and in recent years mushrooming into an expansive convention housed in the Egan Center. Now celebrating its 10th anniversary, Bundick and other organizers are expecting more than 4,000 attendees, and Alaska Business Monthly is predicting it will produce an economic impact of $191,000" with the growth likely to continue. Its organizer said “We’re still getting [vendor and artist] applications for this year. This is the first time we’ve had a waiting list...Local people and businesses are wanting to get in on it."

    What sorts of economic and business growth have you seen tied to fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Relating to Canon

    By Janita Burgess on Tirsdag, 20 October 2015 - 4:42pm
    Message type:

    OTW Fannews banner by Sidhrat with the words Relating to Canon across a background photo of the tip of an iceberg

    • My Eastern Shore Maryland took note of a library event where participants could read their fanfiction. The practice is increasingly common wherever book lovers congregate. San Francisco's KALW focused on a regular bookstore event. "Make no mistake, Shipwreck peddles in extremity - it’s gross, sometimes way too gross for me. But even if the jokes are destructive, the audience is doing kind of what our high school teachers told us to do - critically engaging with the text. There’s no right way to relate to books, and Shipwreck underscores this idea through writing about muppet sex, glitter canon orgasms, and shocking acts between Ayn Rand characters. This may seem ridiculous to some who consider themselves serious readers. But this is the largest group of people I’ve ever seen in a bookstore, enjoying themselves raucously."
    • Iowa's Ames Tribune had a tribute to Terry Pratchett which exemplified the ambivalent feelings of some to fanworks. "Louis L’Amour died in 1983. I was 1 year old. I am an avid reader of his books, and a few years ago I read the first book in a planned trilogy. He died before penning the rest of the trilogy. My reaction was the same as when Pratchett passed, 'I wish he had more time! This is a very selfish wish but speaks to the hold that authors can have on our imagination and the place that they occupy in our hearts...For me, this doesn’t translate to wanting others to continue ghostwriting...I mourn the finality, but anything else would feel like a sham, not quite right. However, I do love fan fiction and the desire for people to continue a story that resonates with them so personally. I think that fan fiction can be enjoyed as its own unique being separate from the author’s own canon of published works."
    • Some, like Canada's Global News, seemed a little less clear on what fanfiction actually is, confusing it with cosplay. "Fans were eager to show off their original works of art, some designed by hand. 'This one I made myself so each of the leaves was stitched and glued on. There are over 3,000 leaves,' said cosplayer Melody Wood. The event offers an opportunity for the community to come together and celebrate a common love of fiction in all its forms. 'It’s growing, we are finding our community. Everyone is beginning to embrace their inner nerd,' said cosplayer Kris Brehaut."
    • Rocket News drew attention to Studio Ghibli fanart. "When you find something you really like, it’s sometimes hard to express how much it’s influencing your life. To show off how much they love something, some fans try cosplay or rampant consumerism. Others write songs or fan fiction to tell the world the extent of their affection. But for others, it’s as simple as drawing a picture that perfectly captures all their feelings on the paper...Going by the name GhibliLover92 on DeviantArt, this artist has been on fire lately, sharing tons of drawings and artwork that pays tribute to one of her favorite animation studios, Studio Ghibli. Each of her drawings is vibrant, colorful, and captures the joy and energetic feeling we all get when watching the anime production house’s movies."

    What sorts of tributes would you like to make to fanworks? Write about your favorites in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Generation Pride

    By Janita Burgess on Søndag, 18 October 2015 - 4:40pm
    Message type:

    Banner by Rachel of a generic newspaper with the OTW logo and the words 'OTW Fannews'

    • The new generation of high school and college fangirls have taken note of the way their interests and activities are portrayed in the media, and by others around them. On the same day two articles went up in different college newspapers, by different writers, with the same title -- "In Defense of the Fangirl." At the College of William and Mary, Bri Little wrote "When we dismiss fangirls, we are telling them that it is unreasonable to expect emotional availability, love and acceptance from men. We are telling them that women are somehow undeserving of all these things. Of course it’s all an illusion, an image created to lure young women...But it’s often easier to fantasize about someone I’ll never have because I can imagine him treating me better than I’m treated by men I know in real life. We have to pay the price for wanting better for ourselves."
    • Meanwhile at the University of California, Berkeley, Jackie Roman wrote "The implications of the word 'fangirl' also create a divide among women at a very young age. To be a girl who is a fan of sports and screams alongside the guys during a game is to be a 'cool girl,' not a hysterical fangirl. The reason behind this is connected to our unequal respect for different genders. In this scenario, cool is code for what’s perceived as traditionally masculine. The girls expressing the same level of interest in football or other testosterone-dominated hobbies are seen as inherently different (read: better) than girls interested in traditionally feminine hobbies. And this is to no fault of the women who just want to watch sports without having their interest in it become some kind of sexual fantasy for a guy who glorifies the 'cool girl.' After all, they too are held to patriarchal expectations, only cool so long as they don’t become a tomboy and teeter across gender lines (oh, the binary!)."
    • Two days later at Duke University, Nandhini Narayana wrote about the misogyny towards fanfiction. "However, if people are to criticize fanfiction, then, they should be doing it for the right reasons, not because 'fat, illiterate, silly women who can't get a life' spend their time writing it. It is also true that a lot of online fanfiction is porn. Here’s a shocker: women enjoy porn. Women enjoy sex. Some people watch videos to masturbate, and some people read two thousand words of man on man action. Get over yourselves. Consider the term 'mommy porn.' The concept of a woman writing about BDSM and other women enjoying it apparently deserved a whole new category outside of regular porn. Why? To distinguish it from all the other 5 million pornographic resources on the internet that men enjoy and is, therefore, more serious?"
    • Lastly, at The Mary Sue Saundra Mitchell wrote about feminism and boybands. "What is feminist—what is spectacular— is that in this glossily packaged world of boybands, young women are creating a safe space for themselves. They’re not asking permission. They’re not apologizing. Their Kiss Me, Jong–hyun! and She’s my Louis Tomlinson t-shirts give no quarter. This is for them, and they don’t care if you like it. No wonder it drives men crazy. There’s no room for them here. And for the first time in their lives, they have no choice but to admit it."

    What fannish manifestos have you seen written? Start an entry for them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Unearthing Slash

    By Janita Burgess on Søndag, 4 October 2015 - 3:59pm
    Message type:

    OTW Fannews banner by caitie~ with the text Unearthing Slash along with stylized images of the members of One Direction with slashes between them

    • Vice speculated on why adults read One Direction fanfic, and discussed the appeal of slash. "The appeal of One Direction homoeroticism also seems related to how physically comfortable and genuinely playful the boys are with each other... It seems related to the fact that they are boys who sing songs about feelings and look like they mean it. It seems, unfortunately, related to Louis's irreverent-shading-into-dickish personality, which fans... wish to understand and explain away. Perhaps most significantly, it seems related to taboo and tragedy: how impossible to fall in love with your best friend, while the whole world watches, and also how beautiful."
    • Certainly the ease of stumbling on fanfic has created awkward moments for the subjects of that fiction. NME quoted The Libertines discussing the unnerving combination of fact and fantasy. "A lot of effort has gone into it. There’ll be a poetic stream of consciousness and then suddenly, BANG! My cock will appear in Carl’s ear." The singer added that some of the descriptions were uncannily accurate: "I think it must be written by someone close to us, because apart from the actual sex side of things, which obviously isn’t true, some of it’s quite close to life."
    • The Daily Dot provided a bit of fandom history by discussing Man from U.N.C.L.E.'s slashy past. "As fandom academic Cynthia W. Walker put it, "if Trek was the Big Bang, (Man from U.N.C.L.E.) was the primer." The Man from U.N.C.L.E. was the patient zero for the kind of passionate fan community we see for shows like Sherlock today." It was notable in many ways. "At this point it's practically tradition for TV shows to misinterpret which of their male leads is the real heartthrob. From Spock to Teen Wolf's Stiles, female-driven fandoms tend to gravitate toward the characters who aren't portrayed as suave ladykillers. And back in the day, Illya Kuryakin was a bona fide teen crush magnet."
    • One bit of progress (?) in media coverage of slash is that the pairings are no longer the main surprise to people. Cracked's video gets a lot wrong, such as confusing characters and fandoms with genres, and discussing commercial bestiality erotica series as works of fanfiction. But the idea that pairings might consist of same sex doesn't itself get dubbed as 'weird'.

    Is slash history something you know about? Share your knowledge on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Events Calendar for October

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on Torsdag, 1 October 2015 - 1:14pm
    Message type:

    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Conferences, Fan Events and Fests, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • Ladiesbingo is a bingo challenge for creative works about the relationships between women. It runs for seven months (from September until March). Players create works to fill squares in a bingo card and gain points for the patterns they make. When the challenge ends in March winners are announced based on the number of points amassed.
    • ConClave is an annual convention "dedicated to education and literacy through the advancement of Science Fiction." The guest of honor is Jody Lynn Nye, author of over 40 books including the recent Fortunes of the Imperium and Wishing On a Star. Programming tracks include science, music, literature, and gaming, with a special new track this year called "Mystery and Mayhem." Room parties are encouraged, and all registered hosts will receive a Party Starter Kit. The con is October 9-11 in Dearborn, Michigan, United States.
    • Octocon, the National Irish Science Fiction Convention, is a "weekend celebration of the weird and wonderful, attracting artists, writers, film-makers and fans from across the human sphere of influence." This year's guests of honor are authors Maura McHugh and Emma Newman. It is October 9-12 in Dublin, Ireland.
    • GeekGirlCon gives female geeks and their supporters the opportunity to build a community, share facts and fandom, and learn how they can help promote the role of women and other underrepresented groups in geek culture. It's October 10-11, Seattle, Washington, United States.
    • You've probably seen the fake It's Back to the Future Day posts online for years, but--guess what--October 21, 2015, is the real thing. It's finally the actual day Marty McFly visited in the second movie of the time-travel trilogy.
    • Author and artist signups close October 27 for the Clint Barton Big Bang. Stories must be at least 20,000 words long and focus on the Marvel character. Betas also are needed!
    • TusCon 42 is, unsurprisingly, hosted in Tucson and describes itself as "the best little sci-fi, fantasy, and horror convention in Arizona." Guests of honor are author Seanan Mcguire (October Daye, InCryptid) and fantasy artist Bridget E. Wilde. TusCon will include a burlesque show in addition to a cosplay contest and pet parade. TusCon is October 30-November 1.

    Calls for Papers this month come from:

    • Call for Papers: Moomin Collection. The Moomins, created by Tove Jansson, have delighted and enlightened adults and children for generations and have been translated into several languages. In all, nine books were published, together with five picture books and a comic strip, between 1945 and 1993. At the centennial anniversary of their creator’s birth, a new film has been released, and more of Jansson’s works are now being translated from Swedish into various other languages. This has created a second "Moomin boom." Contributions of 5,000 words are being sought, with abstracts of up to 500 words due by October 30.
    • Call For Papers: Virtual/Physical Fan Spaces for Special Edition of the Journal of Fandom Studies. Fan spaces are increasingly important culturally and financially. Media creators and producers have come to acknowledge the significance of their fans and the need to communicate with them, particularly through social media. Fans, however, also insist upon their own self-contained spaces where they can share their opinions and observations, as well as their transformative works, metatexual analyses, and cosplay. Papers on virtual and physical fan spaces are being sought for a proposed special edition of the Journal of Fandom Studies. Abstracts are due November 1.
    • Call for Papers: Stardom and Fandom, Southwest Popular Culture and American Culture Association Conference. Submit proposals for papers or multipaper panels on Stardom and Fandom by November 1 for the 37th Annual Southwest Popular Culture and American Culture Association Conference. The conference is scheduled for February 10-13, 2016, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States. Monetary awards will be granted for the best graduate papers.

    Help out a researcher!

    Lisa Gaumond ia a doctoral student in Media Psychology at Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, California. She is studying "television viewing and self-discrepancy," and is asking for participants to take a survey describing themselves and their television viewing habits. Participation is anonymous, and survey participants will not receive additional contact. The entire survey should take about 19 minutes to complete. Find the survey online. Participants may submit an email to receive a copy of the dissertation when it is complete. If you have questions about the survey, contact Gaumond at lisaga-at-mit-dot-edu or the Institutional Review Board at 805-898-4034 or IRB-at-fielding-dot-IRB.

    If you have requests for research participation, please view our policy for inclusion at our website.


    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • OTW Fannews: Merging Into Literature

    By thatwasjustadream on Søndag, 27 September 2015 - 5:44pm
    Message type:

    image of books stacked in a small pile with the words OTW Fannews next to them

      Fanfiction discussions continue to crop up alongside other discussions of literature. Montana's Missoula Independent promoted a fanfiction reading by pro writers at a book festival. Meanwhile, an Italian literary festival had a session on fanfiction writing. "Traditionally ignored by the publishing and media industries, fanfiction has been referred to as the refuge of frustrated aspiring writers...The subject is more articulated however, because it touches upon - and includes - literature criticism, copyright, cultural influences, social constructs, and it can't ignore the changes happening in the publishing industry. It's an ongoing conversation that involves an ever growing number of authors, scholars, fans and readers."

    • Not mentioned there but referenced in various other places discussing the new Millennium series novel, was that original fiction increasingly crosses over into fanfiction. "From the reviews and what I’ve read so far, The Girl In the Spider’s Web is a very competent and perfectly entertaining act of literary mimicry, recreating the feel of the characters and the world of the first three books as well as the technothriller procedural plots. But the question is, is there more than that to it? Does it have Larsson’s undertone of political anger and activism against injustice, misogyny and corruption, or is it just a fun pulp romp for the beach? Is it more than just fan fiction? Is that all the fans want? How does it feel to read this knowing that had he lived, Larsson would almost certainly have written a fourth book completely differently?"
    • A post in the Nevada Daily Mail about a local creative writing group discussed fanfiction as an option for writers. "[I]t can be a fun distraction from one's professional writing. And a distraction from your regular writing is one of the problems with fan-fiction! Still, if you have a favorite show, movie, character, etc., that you want to create a new story about, do a search for that one interest and fan-fiction about it. I'm sure you'll find lots of reading."
    • A discussion in Variety with Bryan Fuller touched on the lapse of canon into fanfiction, even when it's being written by its creator. "I feel like it was a unique experience of myself as a fannibal, writing the show as I imagined it — it was my fan fiction — and then sharing it with other fan fiction writers who then elaborated on it in their own ways. It was a wonderful communal experience. I’ve never had a show in the thick of the Twitterverse like I did with 'Hannibal,' and it was a really fantastic, exciting experience, and hopefully one we’ll be able to repeat on 'American Gods.'"

    How have you seen fanfiction merging into literary and canon worlds? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Influence

    By Claudia Rebaza on Onsdag, 23 September 2015 - 3:20pm
    Message type:

    Banner by SoyAlex of concentric circles with 'Fandom Influence' emerging from the center

    • At Destructoid, Laura Kate Dale discussed how the fandom's version of Sonic the Hedgehog prevailed over various canon changes. "[A]n element of consistency to the image of Sonic did remain among the core gaming audience, fueled largely by the actions of a very small section of the fan community. Sonic remained his consistent edgy aspiration figure online for years in very devoted parts of the Internet, oft mocked by those in the wider gaming scene who came across them. DeviantArt original Sonic characters whose names alluded to preteen angst and rebellion, very visible fan-fiction communities and heavy romanticizing of anthropomorphic characters remained a consistent aspect of the mascot's visible face, only becoming more visible with the increased prevalence of the Internet."
    • Tech Insider posted an article pointing out how valuable fanworks can be beyond the texts themselves. "Since Todd's work started gaining popularity, a Wattpad representative says they've seen reads of these stories increase on the platform. Thanks largely to Todd, Pride and Prejudice currently has over 3.5 million reads on Wattpad and Wuthering Heights has just over 1 million. Staggering numbers, when you consider this is a platform best known for fanfiction stories about Disney princesses and Justin Bieber."
    • Writing at The Guardian, author AL Kennedy discussed writing a Dr. Who tie-in novel and perfectly described the exhilaration of fanworks. "It’s sad that so much of the air has gone from literary endeavour, that academic theorising and categorising have come to decide which novels are acceptable and reviewed, that literary publishing has squashed itself into more and more predictable boxes more and more often. Storytelling, company, human solidarity – they never go away, but they do seem to be moving away from the mainstream. It will be the mainstream’s loss. Readers will always go where they can find the joy they knew in childhood, the joy they deserve."

    How have you seen fandoms and fanworks influencing canon? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

Sider

Subscribe to Fanfiction