Die OTW (Organisation für Transformative Werke) ist eine von Fans gegründete gemeinnützige Organisation. Sie soll den Interessen von Fans dienen, indem sie ihnen einen Zugang zu Fankulturen und -werken in ihren unzähligen Formen bietet und deren Geschichte bewahrt.

  • OTW Fannews: Founded on Fanworks

    Tags: Comics, Commercialization of Fans, News of Note, Intellectual Property, Fanfiction, OTW Sightings

    image by Robyn of James Madison, fourth president of the US

    Jennifer Parsons wrote at Tech Dirt about fanfic written by one of the U.S. founding fathers. "Why fanfic? What made Madison decide to use existing characters to make his point rather than inventing his own characters like John Arbuthnot did for his own political allegory?...The easiest way to tackle these questions is to tell you an allegorical story. There once was a comic artist, 'Jim M.,' who wanted to comment upon the important issue of CIA torture. To make his point, he drew a three panel comic strip. In the first panel, Captain America is taking down a fanatical Nazi commander who tortured prisoners of war for the good of the Fatherland...In the second panel, Jim M. draws Captain America standing next to President Obama, who is casually observing that although the CIA did 'torture some folks,' the lapse can be excused because the torturers were patriots who loved their country. In the third panel we see Captain America's shadowed face as he walks away from a burning American flag."

  • Transformative Works and Cultures releases No. 17

    Tags: Transformative Works and Cultures, Announcement, Journal Committee

    Banner by Alice of a book/eReader with an OTW bookmark and a USB plug going into the spine.

    TWC has released No. 17, a general (unthemed) issue comprising seven full-length critical essays, six Symposium essays, two interviews, and three book reviews. The works loosely gather into themes of form and content—the title of Kristina Busse and Karen Hellekson's editorial. The issue showcases a variety of investigations into a myriad of platforms. The issue features several essays that switch the focus from content to form and illustrate the importance of a range of different fan engagements. Fan fiction, fan films, fannish infrastructure, fan subs, and fan archives are all addressed in this issue.

    Several peer-reviewed essays look at the way fan fiction engages with its source texts as well as its surrounding fannish cultures.

  • OTW Fannews: Knowing the Audience

    Tags: Gender and Sexuality, News of Note, Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality, Movies, Sports, Public and Private Identities

    OTW Fannews Knowing the Audience

    Lydia Laurenson wrote for The Atlantic about online anonymity, spurred by the change in Google+'s policy on real names. "I was finding myself on the Internet, but I was also learning skills that would be useful both as a professional and a human offline. My ability to be an effective creator was hugely shaped by writing popular fan fiction and running side-project businesses in virtual worlds. Researchers have also found pseudonymous games to be great environments for training leadership skills...Nowadays, we’re often told that The Future lies in entrepreneurship. I believe that elastic selfhood is crucial for people’s personal development, but it’s important for broader innovation, too. We need space to experiment and risk-tolerant environments where people can learn."