Linksammlung

  • OTW Fannews: Fanworks going public

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Freitag, 10 Januar 2014 - 9:26pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by Diane of a flasher opening a tan raincoat

    • Over the last ten years as fanworks have spread to more and more online sites, it's become a daily occurrence to find a media story pointing to one or more of them. Often these stories profess a sense of astonishment that they exist but don't do any research or provide any useful information. More recently, an even less informative but more unpleasant stunt has become common, as interviewers use fanworks to provoke a celebrity reaction. The fanwork creators are generally no more pleased at the outcome than the celebrities.
    • While such incidents have occurred repeatedly in connection to various fandoms, one has finally brought the fan point-of-view into the media coverage. As reported in various outlets, at a special screening for Sherlock fans its panel moderator insisted on the lead actors reading excerpts from a NSFW fanfic. What was different were the number of writers focusing on fans' reactions. "There has been an outpouring of support for ‘mildredandbobbin’ from Tumblr Sherlockians, with one slash fiction writer even outing herself and declared that she was proud of what she wrote. Another supporter has written an open letter, attacking Moran and saying that she has helped perpetuate a misogynistic misrepresentation of the fangirls."
    • Chris Meadows at Teleread prompted a discussion about the issue. "So, both Cumberbatch and Freeman seem to be more or less cool with the whole slash fan art thing. Yet various personalities seem to think it’s funny to confront them with this stuff over and over, as if this time they’ll manage to get a rise out of them."
    • Author Angela Highland expressed concern at the message being sent by such incidents. "I’m a fan of not pointing and laughing at people. There’s way too much of that in the world. And not enough encouragement of people to make some goddamn art."
    • Zap2It recounted the incident with many excerpts of the fic, but concluded "There may be two important lessons here: 1) Fan fiction has its place and this was not it. 2) Never mess with a fandom. They do not appreciate those who mock."
    • Queerty called the stunt a disaster. "According to audience reports, as is often the case when mainstream tastes detect even a hint of kink, Moran presented the fanfic as mocking and silly and campy and lame. Because gosh, how stupid of people to be passionate about something."
    • The Telegraph went beyond the incident to mention fanfiction traditions and explain what went wrong. "Some of the people writing fanfic - including the author of the piece Moran supplied to Cumberbatch and Freeman - are grown women and mums finding an enjoyable and productive outlet for having fun. They don't want to see the fourth wall broken any more than the actors want to do it."
    • Blogger Sarah Siegel took a contrary view, in part because of the lack of visible reaction to previous events. "And nobody’s ever really made a fuss about it. The author or artist chose to share their work publicly, and at worst it makes for an uncomfortable interview — which is the interviewer’s prerogative. The one caveat I’d add is that there is a difference between a TV interview intended to promote a project which will be screened to thousands (or millions) of people, and a very intimate Q&A intended for a small audience of die-hard fans. So if Moran made one gaffe, it was in not really understanding her audience." If so, then presumably the next time such an incident occurs, no one will be able to suggest that it's never mattered to anyone.

    What fanwork ambushes have you seen happening? Write about them Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Home of the tech

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Mittwoch, 8 Januar 2014 - 8:13pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by caitie of the OTW logo being lifted by multiple Twitter birds

    • Tech developers are taking note of people's interest in using all sorts of platforms for storytelling. AuthorBee is targeting those using Twitter clients (or AuthorBee's own web interface) "to create, co-create and curate rich, long-form stories with their followers." Targeting both professionals and amateurs the company states "'A story can really be anything...it can be breaking news, fan fiction or poetry. It can also be a travel log, a Haiku, a hip-hop song or a chocolate chip cookie recipe. What matters is the common interest or passion shared by the contributors.'"
    • Kik, on the other hand, took note of its existing users and decided to market to them. Digiday reported "Behold, the power of boyband fans": "'Kik mentioned that "One Direction" was one of the most discussed things on the app, so we brought that opportunity to Sony Music,' said Eytan Oren, director of partnerships at the IPG Media Lab." Noting that marketers need to pay attention to who is using what and how, another IPG spokesman said "You can’t be a professional and ignore where emerging channels are focused."
    • The New Republic explored the effect Netflix is having on television and the lifespan of entertainment products, concluding that it is following a fandom model. "When you meet someone with the same particular passions and sensibility, the sense of connection can be profound. Smaller communities of fans, forged from shared perspectives, offer a more genuine sense of belonging than a national identity born of geographical happenstance. Whether a future based fundamentally on fandom is superior in any objective sense is impossible to say...Certainly, a culture where niche supplants mass hews closer to the original vision of the Americas, of a new continent truly open to whatever diverse and eccentric groups showed up."

    How have you seen technology affecting fandom? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: The power of the personal

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Montag, 6 Januar 2014 - 12:35am
    Nachrichtenart:
    • Nico Lang wrote in Salon about why an album is her Thanksgiving go-to. "When Liz Phair was recording 'Guyville,'...she had to pretend that she could find the answers in his music, a way to go forward as an artist. However, Phair knew all you really have is what’s in your own head, and listening to 'Exile on Main Street' on repeat tells you more about yourself than it ever will about Mick Jagger. 'Exile' has become a tradition for me...not as a memento of the past but as part of a relationship that will continue to evolve even as others come and go. We have the traditions that are given to us by historical edict, but the more important ones are those you build for yourself, the constants that remind you of who you are and where you’ve been."
    • Emily S. Whitten had things to be thankful for in her Comic Mix columm. She wrote about the results of a fandom auction to help her with vision surgery expenses. "[B]y the end of the auction, fandom, consisting of some people I knew but many I didn’t, had raised the entire $8,000. Add to that a few other generous donations from friends who had learned of the online fundraising secondhand...and my recovery and medication expenses were covered as well. I could hardly believe it, but there it was. This tremendous burden lifted from my life by the kindness of a community. Seeing fandom come together to help me like that was, and to this day is, one of the most amazing things I’ve ever experienced."
    • The Otaku Journalist wrote about one fan's experience moving to a relationship with someone she was fannish about. Asked "What has been the most interesting part of your transition from fan to girlfriend?" she responded "I am a fan! *punch*...I joke to him that I’m his fangirlfriend. Before and after we got together I drew fanart, wrote a fanfic, read his fan tumblr, and watched each episode when it comes out. I also did a cosplay once, but I’m too bashful for him to see me in it. The only thing that is different is that I know some upcoming AT4W stuff. Not a whole lot, but now I get the excitement of seeing other fans reactions." Dating someone who has fanworks about him is "Like dating anyone, but with more pictures and words!"

    What have you personally experienced in your fandoms? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Exploring fair use

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Freitag, 3 Januar 2014 - 8:40pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by Lisa of a spraypainted wall reading 'Remix'

    • A recent legal spat over the repurposing of a Beastie Boys song brought discussions of fair use to the fore. xojane claimed "The Beastie Boys versus GoldieBlox battle cuts close to my heart because I love the Beastie Boys, and I love companies developing anti-sexist takes on products, but I also love fair use. And in this particular instance, the Beastie Boys are wrong. The celebration of their fight against GoldieBlox is missing a key component of the situation here, which is that the GoldieBlox video, which perhaps not ethically defensible given the expressed wishes of Adam Yauch, could very well be perfectly legal. And you should want it to be, because fair use and transformative works lie at the heart of so much of art, culture, criticism, and society."
    • On the Media's P.J. Vogt cited similar issues in his discussion. "[I]f you side with Goldieblox, you probably see a hypocrisy here. The Beastie Boys built a career on sampling. How can they then turn around and tell Goldieblox their own work can only be recontextualized with permission?" But he sided with the band until "I spoke to an actual expert, Julie Ahrens, Director of Copyright & Fair Use at Stanford’s Center for Internet & Society. She convinced me that Goldieblox is probably in the right here...After all, while the Goldieblox ad is, in fact, an ad, it’s also a legitimate piece of cultural criticism."
    • Reap Magazine also tackled the issue of transformative works and came to a similar conclusion. "What fans create in modern transformative works of art today is really an extension of what artists like Duchamp and Warhol did in the past. And as much as some studio producers, artists and writers would like to control spectator reaction from a legal standpoint, that just is not realistic."

    What fair use discussions do you have to share? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Slapping on labels

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Freitag, 3 Januar 2014 - 12:42am
    Nachrichtenart:
    • As fanfiction and other fanworks become an increasingly common mainstream reference, disputes about what it is and isn't are likely to grow. However, one problem emerges when professionally published content is somehow distinguished from fanfic simply because an outlet like NPR doesn't want to call it that. "When writers finish a book, they may think they've had the last word. But sometimes another writer will decide there's more to the story. Bertha from Jane Eyre and the father in Little Women are just two examples of secondary characters who have been given a fuller life in a new work of fiction based on a classic novel."
    • In another terminology mishmash, The Daily Dot reported on a new game called slash: romance without boundaries which takes "Cards Against Humanity to the next level, offering fans the chance to create the ultimate OTP (One True Pairing)." The game successfully raised double its original goal on Kickstarter to begin production, but the title is odd given that the purpose of the game is shipping, not necessarily slashing. The idea seems to come more from how "[t]he game’s designer, Glenn Given...used to weave fanfic crossovers into his high school RPG adventures."
    • Foreign Policy reported on a variety of new Chinese terms in circulation because "the Chinese Internet [is] obsessed with writing gay Sherlock Holmes fanfiction" However, "[w]hat makes his Chinese fans special...is that some are risking jail to write him into slash fiction. In early 2011, authorities in China's inland Henan province arrested Wang Chaoju, the webmaster of the slash fiction website Danmei Novels Online, and charged him with 'disseminating obscene content' after finding about 1,200 sexually explicit danmei stories among the tens of thousands on the site. Later that year, Justice Online, a legal news website, labeled slash a 'harmful trend,' quoting a psychologist who said the literature 'could lead to a deviation of sexual orientation, difficulty interacting in social situations, and even criminal activity.' To avoid punishment, writers and readers of explicit slash often exchange content over email, ensuring the work remains invisible to the wider Internet."

    How do you define different fandom terms? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Changing the 'mainstream'

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Dienstag, 24 Dezember 2013 - 10:11pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by Bremo of the Power Puff Girls, Spiderman, The Flash and a Young Avengers #1 comics cover along with the post title.

    • A blog post in the L.A. Weekly asked if fandom is doing enough about diversity. "I had attended a panel called 'Beyond Cliches -- Creating Awesome Female Characters for Comics, Film & Video Games.' It was an interesting discussion that touched on the struggles that writers have when trying to sell female-centric animated TV series...But the panel was lacking in some areas. One of the audience members pointed this out...that the panelists, who were male and female, were all Caucasian...[and] made the point that issues of race have to be included in the discussion. He had a point, but, unfortunately, the comment didn't prompt the lengthy discussion that it deserves."
    • At Unleash the Fanboy, Jay Deitcher spoke about the difficulty of finding works to spend money on, even though he wanted to support small businesses. "Even Marvel, the big monster, understands that adding color, religion and diversity to their comics sell. Sadly, it is the mom-and-pop stores that are standing in the way of diversifying the market, and they are going to go broke doing it...Their shelf was filled with the old school Ultimate Peter stories, but the shop only ordered 1 copy of Miles Morales’s origin. When their 1 copy sold, they didn’t order more...you would think they would see that I have Young Avengers, Miles Morales, and others titles on my pull list, but somehow I am still invisible to them."
    • At the New Statesman, Laurie Penny discussed how the literary world needs a reality check for its views about sex. "I can open my laptop and access reams of smutty stories – some of which, like EL James’s Fifty Shades of Grey, end up as paperback bestsellers." So "[t]he squeamish sensibilities that produce the Bad Sex Awards have, in common with commercially produced pornography, the assumption that there is an objective scale by which the goodness or badness of sex may be judged, and a standard script from which one ought not to deviate." Instead, we ought to say that "[b]ad sex is what happens when we believe that talking about sex is 'redundant' and writing about it is 'crude'. It’s what happens when sexuality becomes a shameful, angry place at the forbidden centre of culture."

    What mainstream changes do you see that need to be made? Write about it Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Reading fandoms

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Donnerstag, 19 Dezember 2013 - 5:43pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by Diane of an open book with a pencil in the center, an OTW logo and the post title

    • Fanworks as an element of fandom activity seems to be growing, even among media outlets that cover fannish topics. Pop Crush decided to poll its readers on "Would you rather read fan fiction about One Direction‘s Harry Styles or Austin Mahone?" while Hardwood Paroxysm began mixing fanfiction and analysis. "Here’s a new feature we’re trying out at the Ol’ Paroxysm. It’s called Fantasy Fiction. One writer, Kyle Soppe, gives you a fantasy basketball update for the week–who’s been good and who’ll be good pickups. Another writer (this week, it’s Jordan White) writes some fan fiction about the week’s players."
    • Meanwhile on the literary front, fanfiction is fitting right in. In a book review of A Little History of Literature in the New Statesman they note that "[t]here is no hand-wringing about the death of the book...[n]or does he bewail the popularity of the fan-fiction websites...These forums for the common writer revive a form of storytelling that, like the Odyssey, “is not commissioned, nor is it paid for, nor is it ‘reviewed’, nor is it bought. It is not, as the term is usually applied, ‘published’. 'Fanfic' is part of an evolving online republic in which writing is not a commodity but a 'conversation.'"
    • Mashable asked about the future of book clubs while discussing Tumblr's reblog book club. "Fershleiser made sure that she chose a book that would appeal to Tumblr readers. `In choosing books, it’s a combination of what do I feel comfortable recommending [to someone] as young as 13, but also will be compelling to adult readers, and what will resonate with the Tumblr community, which skews a little nerdy, a little progressive and a lot fandomy'." Being only online and "moderating a month-long book discussion ...was much more time-consuming than hosting a physical book club. `The challenge is how much time it takes to do right — trying to respond to every question and concern, making sure everyone's being heard.'"
    • Novelist Daniel R. Pike told the TriValley Times about the difficulty of getting published, even if he first succeeded at 17. “Final Fantasy 7 is the reason I went to college to be an English major” because “I started writing fan fiction for that game when I was in high school."

    What fandom reading have you been doing? Write about it Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Social media wins and losses

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Mittwoch, 18 Dezember 2013 - 5:01pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by Erin of the post title next to an image of Tom Hiddleston leaping from behind the Tumblr logo to nab the Twitter bird

    • With both fans and entertainment projects utilizing social media, it's important to understand the playing field. Mashable cited Dr.Who for knowing "How to Keep Secrets in a Social Media World" while The Guardian looked at Tom Hiddleston's publicity skills. "Hiddleston though doesn't seem to be going through the motions, which is why it works. Like Jennifer Lawrence, his is an unfiltered realness that is fast becoming the ultimate asset in post-Twitter, post-PR Hollywood."
    • Aside from celebrities utilizing social media to go straight to the audience, Mirror Online's use of a One Direction fan to write about 1D day will likely be one of many efforts to connect to fans' by utilizing their voices in published pieces.
    • Not Literally Productions used fandom's practices to create a parody version of Icona Pop's "I Don't Care," titled "I Ship It", and are offering the single for sale, moving from social media to commerce.
    • The Verge discussed how facilitating more connectivity among fans can backfire. Sony PlayStation 4's 'Playroom' allowed users to broadcast themselves to other gamers. "Sony was seen to be rushing to slam its ear to the ground, picking up current video-game trends without truly understanding them." As a result, "[t]he rise, rapid descent, and subsequent banning of The Playroom on Twitch is a lesson for Sony. Racing to be part of the fastest-growing subsection of the largest entertainment medium in the world is more difficult when the people who inhabit that space already are entrenched, and have their own specific ways of doing things. As for the worrying content: it may just be human nature that given a camera and a means to communicate, we'll do so in a way that is by turns ingenious and disturbing."

    What social media fandom trends have you been seeing? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom in classrooms & history

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Sonntag, 15 Dezember 2013 - 8:37pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by caitie of the post title written in chalk on a green chalkboard

    • A post on the New York Times' Learning Network discussed students confronting 'what ifs' in classwork. "In this lesson, students will discuss how they 'read' their favorite television shows in order to make predictions about what will happen, then apply these skills to speculate about what happens to literary characters after their favorite novels or plays end. Finally, they will use the inferences they gain through close reading to create imagined futures for these characters in comic strips, next chapters, letters, journals or videos."
    • Fandom scholar Henry Jenkins' hosted an exploration of comics fandom in Poland on his blog. "In the 'Participatory Poland' report a group of Polish aca-fen makes a preliminary attempt towards defining the specificity of an Eastern European country’s participatory culture shaped both in the communist and post-communist periods. By placing the development of selected fan-based activities against a broader socio-historical background, we are trying to capture the interplay between the global and the local context of participatory culture, as well as take preliminary steps towards making its Polish branch available for academic research."
    • Pinboard creator Maciej Cegłowski gave a presentation titled "Fan is a Tool-Using Animal" on fandom communities online and their use of bookmarks. He discussed his interest in having fans come to his site after observing their intriguing use of Del.icio.us, but due to their attachment to the site he had no luck until the site changed enough to drive fans away. He also spoke about the importance of fandom culture and its endurance over time. "Part of the reason our television sucks less than it used to is because people are more sophisticated about the way they watch them...fandom analyzes this stuff to death and deconstructs it...and this percolates back into the culture." (Audio only)
    • The University of Iowa, which houses Open Doors' Fan Culture Preservation Project, released a video about the Doctor Who fanzines in their Special Collections & Archives to celebrate the show's 50th anniversary. Although there is no transcript available, the post description includes a mini guide to the collection.

    What academic explorations of fandom have you come across? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Legal stands

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Samstag, 14 Dezember 2013 - 10:55pm
    Nachrichtenart:
    • Online platform WordPress recently took a stand against abuse of DMCA takedown notices. They decided to join with journalists using the site in a suit "for damages under Section 512(f) of the DMCA, which allows for suits against those who 'knowingly materially misrepresent' a case of copyright infringement. Until there are some teeth to the copyright laws, it’s up to us — websites and users, together — to stand up to DMCA fraud and protect freedom of expression...We’ll also be actively involved, on behalf of our users, in trying to change the law — both through court cases and in Congress — to make sure that everyone has the right to share their voice on the internet without threat of censorship."
    • The University of New Hampshire's student newspaper reported on a challenge to courses using pop culture texts. "Over the summer, UNH offered an online class to children grades four through eight using Harry Potter to teach the kids grammar and literature tools. Warner Brothers, however, sent the university a cease and desist letter regarding some of its copyrighted material." The "cease and desist letter asked UNH to change the class so that those interested in it did not think Warner Brothers sponsored the course."
    • Fans interested in learning more about copyright can take a free non-credit online course. "CopyrightX is a twelve-week networked course, offered each Spring under the auspices of Harvard Law School, the HarvardX distance-learning initiative, and the Berkman Center for Internet and Society. The course explores the current law of copyright and the ongoing debates concerning how that law should be reformed. Through a combination of pre-recorded lectures, weekly seminars, live webcasts, and online discussions, participants in the course examine and assess the ways in which law seeks to stimulate and regulate creative expression." Registration begins December 13.

    What legal fandom issues have you become aware of? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

Seiten

Subscribe to Linksammlung