Gender and Sexuality

  • Events Calendar for March

    Von Jennifer Rose Hale am Sonntag, 1 März 2015 - 1:30pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup for the month of March! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Conferences, Fan Events and Fests, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • Subtitled "the slash slumber party," Escapade 2015 is celebrating 25 years of bringing slash fans together. The event has three panel tracks--fandom-specific, meta discussion, and tech--and panel discussion is "highly interactive." Attendance to Escapade (March 6-8 in Los Angeles, California, United States) is capped at 150. Read fan impressions of Escapade at Fanlore.
    • Cardboard*Con is "the world's most affordable science fiction / fantasy convention, and the first dedicated to the art of cardboard costuming." The event includes workshops and a costume contest. It's in Atlanta, Georgia, United States, on March 7.

    • Described as a "light-hearted academic conference," the Conference on Middle-Earth 2015 is a single-track conference dedicated to the works of J.R.R. Tolkien. It takes place March 28-29, in Albany, New York, United States.

    • The Pop Culture Association/American Culture Association Joint Annual Conference will include topics related to fandom and fan theory such as fanfiction, cosplay, fan pilgrimages, and more. Mat Fraser, actor (American Horror Story: Freak Show) and disability advocate, will be a featured speaker. The conference is April 1-4 in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States.

    Calls for Papers this month come from:

    • Gendered Politics of Production: Girls and Women as Media Producers. Girls and women are producing more media than ever before, but they face misogynistic backlash in occurrences such as the recent "Gamergate." As part of a one-day symposium at Middlesex University, writers are encouraged to submit papers on themes including, but not limited to, historical analyses of girls and women as media producers; the production and circulation of feminist and activist media texts; gendered labour in media industries; and methodological approaches to studying production cultures. Abstracts of 250 words and a 50-word bio are due March 15; the symposium is June 16.

    • The Fan Studies Network 2015 Conference. The Fan Studies Network is issuing a call for papers and panels for this year's conference. Topics include but are not limited to activism and fandom, fandom and conflict, fan conventions, transculture and fandom, and more. The conference is also accepting expressions of interest in a short "speed-geeking" session, in which a speaker can chair a discussion of a brief idea for feedback. Submissions are due March 22; the conference is June 27-28 in Norwich, United Kingdom.

    • Edited Volume on Non-Professional Subtitling. Non-professional subtitling (sometimes known as "fansubbing") is one of the less-studied forms of user-generated content, arising in the 1980s with the growing popularity of anime in the United States. In this case, "non-professional" doesn't refer to the quality but instead to the type of content produced for distribution online and without profit. Both scholars and practitioners are welcome to contribute papers for a volume on the subject area. Topics can include but are not limited to the non-professional subtitling process, products, communities, and training. Abstracts are due March 31 with full articles due August 30; the volume's anticipated publication date is January 2016.

    Help out a researcher!

    This month we received two requests for research participation:

    The first request is from Arinda Sutantapreeda at Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. She is conducting an online survey on the users of fanfiction websites and the relationship between authors' gender, sexual orientation, and the preference for types of erotic stories.

    Her contact information is arinda [dot] sutantapreeda [at] gmail [dot] com.

    You can find the survey online; note that the latter part of the survey is ages 18 and up only, though all ages can participate in the first half. The research results will be shared with survey participants who provide their email addresses in the survey or who send their email address separately.

    The second request comes from Lidia Wisniewska at the Department of Psychology, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, Poland.

    She is working on a study to find out more about motivation to read (and write) fanfiction, and is asking authors and readers to take a survey. She has Ethical Board approval for this effort as part of a larger project.

    Her contact information is lidiaw [at] umk [dot] pl.

    Survey results are anonymous, and by participating in the survey you are giving consent to have your answers included in the research. Results will be published and available on request.

    If you have requests for research participation, please view our policy for inclusion at our website.


    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • OTW Fannews: Shades of Fanworks

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Sonntag, 22 Februar 2015 - 7:08pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by James Baxter of colored pencils arranged in a circle around the title Shades of Fanworks

    • The release of Fifty Shades of Grey in theaters led to a wave of stories connecting it to its fanfiction roots. A post at MoviePilot though, focused on fan art for the fandom.
    • Vodkaster asked if the movie was about what women wanted or what fans wanted (article in French). Writer Johanna Ruiz cited surveys showing that literature was a particularly female format, and stated that women were embracing writing online to create their own literature. She further suggested that there's a deficiency in representing women's desire in commercial production which has led to its expression within fanfiction.
    • Independent focused on the new markets reached by the book, while overlooking fandom entirely. "While there are all sorts of negative connotations around erotic fiction, what the mainstream publishing world never really reckoned on was the fact that women actually wanted to read these books.... Somehow EL James and a respectable publisher managed to introduce pornography to a demographic that are ordinarily notoriously porn-proof. This was soft porn for suburbia, erotica made accessible, not to mention acceptable, through its coverage in the respectable pages of the Sunday supplements."
    • Vanity Fair renewed claims that literary agents are searching fan fiction sites for the next Fifty Shades of Grey. "Her pitch to publishing houses was forthright about the book’s origins, but she didn’t lead with its fanfic roots, admitting, 'In many ways the way in which you enter publishing determines where you will be.' At the time, there was also a sense that the Fifty Shades effect wouldn’t have staying power. 'There were definitely editors that said they thought [fan] fic was over, which I think is funny in retrospect because that was 2012, and how many deals have there been since then?'"

    What are all the deals you know about of fanfic that was pulled to publish? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Learning from Fanfic

    Von Kiri Van Santen am Dienstag, 6 Januar 2015 - 5:58pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    graphic by Ania of a woman reading a book with AO3 open on her computer

    • Technology Tell looked at what fanfiction told them about character popularity in Dragon Age. "The proof is in the sorting. I started my search over at An Archive of Our Own. It has a section set aside for Dragon Age Inquisition fanfiction, and allows people to search by specific character. Cullen is the top result, appearing in 251 stories. He even beats out the main character, the female Inquisitor, as she only has 216 stories...I decided to check the internet’s other, largest repository – Fanfiction.net...it’s clear he’s still a favorite of fanfiction authors. He appears in 588 stories on the site."
    • A post at TV Over Mind instead discussed what kind of fanfiction fans of Suits were writing. "Most tend to pair up Mike Ross and Harvey Specter, seeing as they are the glue that holds Suits together in a sense; without them, the show’s not as interesting to watch as it was before given that Harvey was the one that hired Mike as his associate after being impressed by how much the young man knows about the law. However, there are other pairings as well, like Donna Paulsen and Harvey Specter, because the author wants them to be involved romantically, and since it’s not quite happening on the show just yet, writing a fictional story about it allows for fans of the show to enjoy the possibility of this development."
    • Autostraddle was one of many sites turning to fanfic recs for content. "[T]he future is now and fandom is mainstream and queer women who love pop culture are changing the shape of the world! Part of it is writing/reading fan fiction, which smashes the patriarchy in so many exciting and accessible ways... Faking It is...fun for a lot of reasons, including how the collective power of femslash fandom is what caused Glee and South of Nowhere to buck the fauxmosexual sweeps weeks tropes of yore (thanks, The O.C.!) and really delve into lady-loving relationships on-screen."
    • Rather than rec existing work, Sugarscape decided to get readers to write some. "We're looking for you lot to get as creative as possible, whether that's saliva filled snogs, lustful glances or villainous characters (Ashton Irwin dressed as the Grinch anyone?), so keep it original and feel free to bring in any celebs you fancy. The idea is that every day when the story is updates, you'll have the chance to add the next paragraph all over again and by Sunday 21st December, we'll have the full fan fiction."

    What have you learned from fanfiction? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Troubling Issues

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Sonntag, 4 Januar 2015 - 5:42pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by Alice of male and female figures under the post title Troubling Issues.

    • At Alternative Press, Cassie Whitt brought an adult's perspective to the issue of why female interests are denigrated. "[T]hat girl is told she’s 'everything that’s wrong with music these days' because self-perceived rock ’n’ roll crusaders need to defend music from the evil powers that, you know, actually put their energy, time and money into (gasp) actually keeping the music world alive. And demonizing fangirls is not an issue that solely harms female fans. A male friend recently confided to me, 'Man, I love My Chemical Romance, but I almost feel like I have to defend that as a 20-something man' because of the perception of their fanbase. Because we live in a society where we’ve taught men it’s not okay to like things that young girls do, where they have to explain or completely conceal their own passions. A fangirl’s devotion is the precise kind of fervor that can't be taught. It's the thing that puts them at the front row of shows now, and later in life, will put them anywhere else, doing anything they want to do."
    • At First Showing, Patrick Campbell examined the state of movie fandom. "[H]ow did we end up in this snarky, sad, and frustrating state of film fandom that we're in now? I believe there are a few explanations, to this problem, and it's ones we really need to look into ourselves to try and fix... I believe many have lost the wide-eyed wonderment that it takes to love movies. The cynical nature seems to be coming from a loss of an inner child for many... There seems to be an obsession with making things realistic in film, especially post Christopher Nolan's Batman series, but not all films need to play by that. Every movie has its own set of rules, and what may work in the film may not happen in real life, but that's the point. It's good to retain your childlike nature sometimes, and take films in that way."
    • The Fandom Post discussed arguments surrounding dubtitles. "[I]n the end, what sucks about dubtitles is that people keep using them as an excuse to not buy licensed releases because they want to play to this belief that everything is dubtitled, or that subs are so poorly done that everything is just rotten to the core. Having quite a few friends that translate both manga and anime and seeing and hearing the horror stories of accusations, and looking at the process of how it’s done, it’s beyond a flimsy excuse. That, my friends, is the bad in all of those."
    • Medical Daily discussed reports of a chemical attack on a hotel hosting a furry convention. "Nineteen people needed to be transported to nearby hospitals with symptoms consistent with chemical exposure such as nausea, dizziness, and other medical problems." Author Dana Dovey added, "When a group faces violent, prejudice motivated crime because of his or her perceived membership in a certain social group, this is considered to be a hate crime. Based on the initial review of this weekend’s FurFest incident, police are not ruling this out as a possibility. A criminal investigation has been opened."

    What troubling issues have you seen in fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Profiles in Marketing

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Sonntag, 14 Dezember 2014 - 6:32pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by Erin of Barbie working at a computer with the OTW logo on it, with two adults looking on in the background. The banner reads 'OTW Fannews: Profiles in Marketing'.

    • An increasing number of companies are marketing toward girls and women in tech, but not every attempt to capitalise on the trend is well-executed. NPR covered widespread criticism of Mattel's Barbie: I Can Be A Computer Engineer. “‘It starts so promising; Barbie is designing a game to show kids how computers work,’ said Ribon. […] Brian and Steven take over — and, at the end of the day, Barbie takes credit for the boys' work.” OTW Legal staffer Casey Fiesler, whose feminist remix went viral and was featured in the NPR story, took to her own blog to explain why non-commercial remix is allowed under US copyright law. "It is so amazing how many people care about representation of women in computing, and I’m thrilled and humbled that something I created helped to expand this conversation. I wrote a piece for Slate about the process and the ideas behind Barbie, Remixed, but something I wanted to discuss in more detail was the act of remix itself rather than the critique behind it."
    • TribLIVE reported on a new TV network focused on fandom. "When Pop, a cable network most people probably refer to as TVGN, launches Jan. 14, it will do so with programs that celebrate the continuing ability of such, well, institutions, as New Kids On the Block and 'Everybody Loves Raymond' to cut a swath through popular culture."
    • UK site YouGov researches audiences to determine the characteristics of people with particular interests or fandoms. By using their profiler you could discover that Good Omens fans are more likely to be 40-59 year old males who work in IT, are left leading when it comes to politics, and also are fans of John Barrowman, Stephen Fry, James May, Nathan Fillion and Patrick Moore.
    • The publishing industry is among those wanting to target fans, and a recent conference on the children's book trade included a panel on fanfiction. Meanwhile Wikia is declaring itself "the ultimate source for powerful and relevant pop culture, entertainment and game expertise" and is producing a video series on fandom in 2014 along with Disney's Maker Studios. The idea is to create amateur/professional partnerships. "The partnership has already resulted in some quirky combinations, including one pairing of a devotee of the AMC period drama Mad Men with the creator of the Drinks Made Easy YouTube channel. 'We hope to continue to define projects that allow for creators and super fans to come together and be in the spotlight.'"

    What marketing efforts utilizing fans have you spotted? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Featuring Fangirls

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Sonntag, 7 Dezember 2014 - 7:32pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by Robyn of multiple female symbols reading 'OMG' on pink background and saying

    • Supernatural 's 200th episode focused on fangirls. Showrunner Jeremy Carver said “'Over the past couple of years we’ve seen a real, real swing in the number of 13, 14, and 15 year old female [fans] — girl who have been watching the show — and I for one have been really struck by at Comic Con this year [how] most of our questions seemed to come from young women,' Carver said. 'And they were really funny and really smart, and they were going toe-to-toe with the boys, and we were like ‘We’ve got to give these women a platform and a voice and a point of view. It just felt like a way to give back.'”
    • Reactions to the show differed. This ranged from acknowledging the change in fangirl portrayal to pointing out how there are still gaps in their portrayal and complaints about the episode's overall message. "But in the end, that comes as pretty damn condescending. Fans – readers – are going to have their own interpretations no matter what. They’re going to imagine what their favorite characters had for breakfast, fill in the blanks that the author didn’t get in, and wonder about the possibilities, because that’s in the very nature of fiction...Virgil didn’t need Homer’s permission to write fan fiction about Aeneas, and Milton certainly didn’t ask God for permission to write a twelve-book fan fic about Satan." At least one outlet noted about Season 10 that fanfiction was giving the Demon Dean storyline a more "emotionally satisfying conclusion."
    • At Highbrow Magazine, Sandra Canosa wrote about the importance of teenybopper fangirls. "Fandom does not exist solely within a vacuum, especially in today’s Internet age. There are legions of sites, Facebook groups, and Twitter conversations that, while born out of fandom, often develop into meaningful bonding moments between girls. Belieber and Directioner forums combine threads of celebrity gossip with conversations about love, relationships, and understanding one’s own body in a communal space largely between and within other like-minded girls. By actively participating in an audience fan culture, teens can also find meaningful experiences outside the realm of the commercial machine."
    • At The Daily Californian Rosemarie Alejandrino wrote about the evolution of fangirling. "Back in the olden days — circa 2006 — there were no Twitter Q&As or follow sprees. If you wanted to interact with your favorite star, you had to wait at your desktop computer for three hours while a blog.tv livestream buffered on your Dell family computer, slurping instant noodles while popping in and out of spam-ridden chat rooms for the chance of a shout out from your favorite boyband."

    What do you think perfectly captures fangirls? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Women's Experiences In Fandom

    Von Janita Burgess am Mittwoch, 19 November 2014 - 5:27pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    OTW Fannews Banner Women's Experiences in Fandom

    • Comic Book Resources reported on a NYCC panel about female fandom in which Kelly Sue DeConnick said, "'I think that there's an important thing to remember too, that what you're seeing now, the influx of female readership and female creators is not a revolution, it's a restoration...Back in the '30s and '40s there was a girls' magazine that had a distribution of 300,000 copies per month and it was comics... [In the decades since] women were discouraged, dissuaded, made unwelcome, and now for a plethora of reasons, women are returning...There are enough comics for everyone...Say it with me now: equality is not a loss.'"
    • In another panel at New York Comic Con, on harassment and assault, the "crowd was greeted with some sobering statistics...25% of women at cons have reported being sexually harassed, 13% report receiving unwanted, inappropriate comments, and 8% of all attendees have been groped or outright assaulted or raped." This sheds light on the post in The Awl discussing rape charges in web celebrity fandoms, which speculated on the thinking of perpetrators. "Internet celebrity is just another opportunity, like management or teaching or parenthood, to assert power over victims in new and profound ways."
    • Blogger ladyloveandjustice, wrote about why the Mary Sue is a sexist concept. "[O]ne of the CONTROVERSIES listed on the TV Tropes page is if a male sue is even possible. That’s right, it’s impossible to have an idealizied male character. Men are already the ideal. In our culture, male tends to be the default. Women take on the distaff parts. 'Him' and 'mankind' are what humanity are, 'her' and 'womankind' are secondary. Yet this isn’t true for Mary Sue as a term. That name was created first."
    • An article in The Guardian cited fanfic on AO3 and Tumblr as places where teenage girls are the creators of sexual fiction. "'There is a lot of PWP (short for ‘porn without plot’ or ‘plot, what plot?’) out there,' 23-year-old Julia Schnorrer said. 'However, every sex scene in fanfic always has a narrative, since it is integrated in a realm of existing characters. Characters are well-rounded human beings who also have a sex life – not off stage but right in the middle of it. Most fanfic writers are women, and I think it derives from the male gaze that dominates visual pornography.' In fan fiction communities, and on sites such as Tumblr, all types of sexuality are represented – as well as the absence of a sex drive entirely."

    Do women have distinct experiences in fandom? If you think so, write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: What's a Fanwork?

    Von Janita Burgess am Montag, 17 November 2014 - 5:46pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    OTW Fannews Banner What's a Fanwork

    • NPR's "Pop Culture Happy Hour" featured a look at fanfiction with "resident fan-fiction expert, Petra Mayer" who was asked for some recs. Mayer herself reviewed After, and a discussion ensued among listeners as to whether or not RPF qualified as a fanwork. (Partial transcript available).
    • The Daily Dot featured a video it qualified as a fanwork, a genderswap Ghostbusters. "A bunch of middle schoolers put together a shot-for-shot remake of the original Ghostbusters trailer and managed to make it even better. This time around, boys are playing the roles of Dana and Janine, while the girls have the Ghostbusters and Louis Tully covered, complete with self-aware visual effects and gags."
    • Meanwhile the play Badfic Love focused on fanfic writing groups and their personal dramas. "Director Nick Thornton says this production shows just how much talent WMU theatre graduates have. Thorton says it also encourages artists to keep creating. 'We have so much power and we can go out into the world and create our own reality...In a world full of things that are saying, you know: stay at home, don’t do anything, tear down other people’s work. We’re kind of saying, you know, what is your world? What are you going to do with it?'”
    • Jezebel's interview about mpreg with the male mod of an mpreg site focused more on the interest in the topic than its history in fanworks. "Some of our writers focus solely on the birth while others only gloss over it. Some people love it, some people hate it—much like mpreg itself. The positive and negative aspects of pregnancy are usually always included, and many of our artists are sure to include them in their pieces. Pregnancy is made up of so many emotions, symptoms, and milestones. These are part of the visceral experience pregnancy offers, and our members love talking/drawing/writing about it."

    What examples of fanworks are your favorites? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Guest Post: Jamie Broadnax

    Von Kiri Van Santen am Samstag, 4 Oktober 2014 - 4:54pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Graphic by caitie of an OTW-themed guest access lanyard

    From time to time, the OTW will be hosting guest posts on our OTW News accounts. These guests will be providing an outside perspective on the OTW or aspects of fandom where our projects may have a presence. The posts express each author's personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. We welcome suggestions from fans for future guest posts, which can be left as a comment here or by contacting us directly.

    Today's post is an interview with Jamie Broadnax, founder of Black Girl Nerds , an inclusive site for women who embrace geek/nerd culture. Jamie is the Digital Vice President at the She Thrives Network and has written for Afropunk and Madame Noire.

    What do you find to be the most rewarding thing about fandom blogging?

    Having an opinion on a particular fandom and seeing how others respond to it. Whether they agree or disagree. I'm always interested in other people's perspectives on things even if their point of view contrasts mine.

    You started Black Girl Nerds after googling the phrase in 2012 and finding 0 results. In the past years, though, nerd culture has continued to infiltrate the mainstream. In your experience, is the “nerd” world moving toward racial/ethnic and gender inclusivity? And is inclusivity the goal, or do you believe we should focus on creating our own nerd spaces rather than fighting to be allowed into established ones?

    Excellent question. I would love racial/ethnic and gender inclusivity in nerd culture. It's very important that we see ourselves in comic books, TV shows, tech industries, science conventions, and several other industries that tend to marginalize women of color. However, I'm not completely against creating your own nerd space. BGN was created because of the lack of representation within our subculture. I believe taking the initiative to create your own space is what helps foster growth in spaces that are less diverse. I also think it is important that there are safe spaces on the web where people can connect to a community of individuals that identify and relate to them. It is a form of empowerment that is a basic part of the human condition.

    Where in nerd culture or fandom hasn’t progress been made?

    Mainstream nerd websites and TV shows like "Big Bang Theory". I always find it interesting that by default nerds in media spaces are always white and usually male. The tech space also has a ways to go, but luckily more organizations like Digital Undivided and Black Girls Code are bridging the gap. There is still more work to do and having niche communities like Black Girl Nerds is just the beginning to helping diversify all things in nerd culture.

    What do you think is the most important political/legal/philosophical issue in fandom right now?

    Hmmm...that's a toughie. I don't necessarily associate fandoms with serious political or philosophical ideologies. However, one issue that comes to mind is the issue of race playing a factor in cosplay. Many cosplayers have chatted with me online and on my podcast about dealing with vitriol from non-Black cosplayers. My friend Chaka Cumberbatch, a well known Black female cosplayer, was questioned by white nerds as to why she was cosplaying as Sailor Moon.

    The irony of this bitter criticism is, why are white girls cosplaying as an Japanese character?

    Let that one simmer for a minute.

    What book/movie/show/game/etc are you most excited about right now, and why?

    I'm reading Greg Pak's Storm comic which is awesome. She's my favorite superheroine in the Marvel universe. I'm also interested in starting on The Strain book by Guillermo Del Toro. I'm currently a fan of the TV series and really enjoy live tweeting it on Sunday nights.

    The Organization for Transformative Works is a fan-run nonprofit dedicated to preserving fanworks and advocating for fans. Do you believe that these goals are important? Do fans need advocates?

    I love that concept! Absolutely fans needs advocates. I believe having a partner, team, group, or community that is willing to serve and help you makes us all better people. It helps us to grow, connect, and develop new innovative ideas and to overall just have fun with people who get you. It's important, especially for nerds like us who are used to feeling isolated and excluded because many others didn't share our same fandoms.

  • OTW Fannews: Caution, Advice Ahead

    Von Janita Burgess am Sonntag, 28 September 2014 - 4:13pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    OTW Fannews Caution Advice Ahead

    • Advice columnist Prudie from Slate reassured a mother who discovered her 13-year-old daughter reading "fan fiction for a very popular all boy band which describes in explicit detail sex acts between the male band members." (One guess?) In her response, Prudie reminisced on her own illicit Playboy reading as an adolescent and suggested that the mother address the issue but understand she can't police everything. "Your discovery is the kind of thing that does call for a talk," she wrote, "but first you have to both gather yourself and find your sense of humor." She finished by speculating that "the writers of this series didn't think their most avid fans would be teenage girls!"
    • Of course, not all advice is always well understood. Writer Michelle R. Wood discussed her discovery of the OTW's mission to protect and preserve fanworks but stated, "It's important to remember that technically, all of this work is still illegal. Without authorization from the author, publisher, or studio, a fan work is still in violation of copyright." In fact, as the OTW's Legal Advocacy project often explains, fanworks are creative and transformative, which are core fair uses.
    • Then there's also advice that isn't advice at all, such as a post in The Guardian that raised the hackles of some fanfic writers. Its author later apologized, saying "Piece was meant to be quite tongue in cheek, but as we've presented it as a 'how to' that could be misleading. I know fanfic is a big universe, and people do it for all sorts of reasons, inspired by a ton of different ideas. I love that it exists and as far as I'm concerned the more people that are writing stories the better. Sorry to offend!"

    Have words of wisdom for other fanfic readers and writers? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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