Gender and Sexuality

  • OTW Fannews: Profiles in Marketing

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Sonntag, 14 Dezember 2014 - 6:32pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by Erin of Barbie working at a computer with the OTW logo on it, with two adults looking on in the background. The banner reads 'OTW Fannews: Profiles in Marketing'.

    • An increasing number of companies are marketing toward girls and women in tech, but not every attempt to capitalise on the trend is well-executed. NPR covered widespread criticism of Mattel's Barbie: I Can Be A Computer Engineer. “‘It starts so promising; Barbie is designing a game to show kids how computers work,’ said Ribon. […] Brian and Steven take over — and, at the end of the day, Barbie takes credit for the boys' work.” OTW Legal staffer Casey Fiesler, whose feminist remix went viral and was featured in the NPR story, took to her own blog to explain why non-commercial remix is allowed under US copyright law. "It is so amazing how many people care about representation of women in computing, and I’m thrilled and humbled that something I created helped to expand this conversation. I wrote a piece for Slate about the process and the ideas behind Barbie, Remixed, but something I wanted to discuss in more detail was the act of remix itself rather than the critique behind it."
    • TribLIVE reported on a new TV network focused on fandom. "When Pop, a cable network most people probably refer to as TVGN, launches Jan. 14, it will do so with programs that celebrate the continuing ability of such, well, institutions, as New Kids On the Block and 'Everybody Loves Raymond' to cut a swath through popular culture."
    • UK site YouGov researches audiences to determine the characteristics of people with particular interests or fandoms. By using their profiler you could discover that Good Omens fans are more likely to be 40-59 year old males who work in IT, are left leading when it comes to politics, and also are fans of John Barrowman, Stephen Fry, James May, Nathan Fillion and Patrick Moore.
    • The publishing industry is among those wanting to target fans, and a recent conference on the children's book trade included a panel on fanfiction. Meanwhile Wikia is declaring itself "the ultimate source for powerful and relevant pop culture, entertainment and game expertise" and is producing a video series on fandom in 2014 along with Disney's Maker Studios. The idea is to create amateur/professional partnerships. "The partnership has already resulted in some quirky combinations, including one pairing of a devotee of the AMC period drama Mad Men with the creator of the Drinks Made Easy YouTube channel. 'We hope to continue to define projects that allow for creators and super fans to come together and be in the spotlight.'"

    What marketing efforts utilizing fans have you spotted? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Featuring Fangirls

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Sonntag, 7 Dezember 2014 - 7:32pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by Robyn of multiple female symbols reading 'OMG' on pink background and saying

    • Supernatural 's 200th episode focused on fangirls. Showrunner Jeremy Carver said “'Over the past couple of years we’ve seen a real, real swing in the number of 13, 14, and 15 year old female [fans] — girl who have been watching the show — and I for one have been really struck by at Comic Con this year [how] most of our questions seemed to come from young women,' Carver said. 'And they were really funny and really smart, and they were going toe-to-toe with the boys, and we were like ‘We’ve got to give these women a platform and a voice and a point of view. It just felt like a way to give back.'”
    • Reactions to the show differed. This ranged from acknowledging the change in fangirl portrayal to pointing out how there are still gaps in their portrayal and complaints about the episode's overall message. "But in the end, that comes as pretty damn condescending. Fans – readers – are going to have their own interpretations no matter what. They’re going to imagine what their favorite characters had for breakfast, fill in the blanks that the author didn’t get in, and wonder about the possibilities, because that’s in the very nature of fiction...Virgil didn’t need Homer’s permission to write fan fiction about Aeneas, and Milton certainly didn’t ask God for permission to write a twelve-book fan fic about Satan." At least one outlet noted about Season 10 that fanfiction was giving the Demon Dean storyline a more "emotionally satisfying conclusion."
    • At Highbrow Magazine, Sandra Canosa wrote about the importance of teenybopper fangirls. "Fandom does not exist solely within a vacuum, especially in today’s Internet age. There are legions of sites, Facebook groups, and Twitter conversations that, while born out of fandom, often develop into meaningful bonding moments between girls. Belieber and Directioner forums combine threads of celebrity gossip with conversations about love, relationships, and understanding one’s own body in a communal space largely between and within other like-minded girls. By actively participating in an audience fan culture, teens can also find meaningful experiences outside the realm of the commercial machine."
    • At The Daily Californian Rosemarie Alejandrino wrote about the evolution of fangirling. "Back in the olden days — circa 2006 — there were no Twitter Q&As or follow sprees. If you wanted to interact with your favorite star, you had to wait at your desktop computer for three hours while a blog.tv livestream buffered on your Dell family computer, slurping instant noodles while popping in and out of spam-ridden chat rooms for the chance of a shout out from your favorite boyband."

    What do you think perfectly captures fangirls? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Women's Experiences In Fandom

    Von Janita Burgess am Mittwoch, 19 November 2014 - 5:27pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    OTW Fannews Banner Women's Experiences in Fandom

    • Comic Book Resources reported on a NYCC panel about female fandom in which Kelly Sue DeConnick said, "'I think that there's an important thing to remember too, that what you're seeing now, the influx of female readership and female creators is not a revolution, it's a restoration...Back in the '30s and '40s there was a girls' magazine that had a distribution of 300,000 copies per month and it was comics... [In the decades since] women were discouraged, dissuaded, made unwelcome, and now for a plethora of reasons, women are returning...There are enough comics for everyone...Say it with me now: equality is not a loss.'"
    • In another panel at New York Comic Con, on harassment and assault, the "crowd was greeted with some sobering statistics...25% of women at cons have reported being sexually harassed, 13% report receiving unwanted, inappropriate comments, and 8% of all attendees have been groped or outright assaulted or raped." This sheds light on the post in The Awl discussing rape charges in web celebrity fandoms, which speculated on the thinking of perpetrators. "Internet celebrity is just another opportunity, like management or teaching or parenthood, to assert power over victims in new and profound ways."
    • Blogger ladyloveandjustice, wrote about why the Mary Sue is a sexist concept. "[O]ne of the CONTROVERSIES listed on the TV Tropes page is if a male sue is even possible. That’s right, it’s impossible to have an idealizied male character. Men are already the ideal. In our culture, male tends to be the default. Women take on the distaff parts. 'Him' and 'mankind' are what humanity are, 'her' and 'womankind' are secondary. Yet this isn’t true for Mary Sue as a term. That name was created first."
    • An article in The Guardian cited fanfic on AO3 and Tumblr as places where teenage girls are the creators of sexual fiction. "'There is a lot of PWP (short for ‘porn without plot’ or ‘plot, what plot?’) out there,' 23-year-old Julia Schnorrer said. 'However, every sex scene in fanfic always has a narrative, since it is integrated in a realm of existing characters. Characters are well-rounded human beings who also have a sex life – not off stage but right in the middle of it. Most fanfic writers are women, and I think it derives from the male gaze that dominates visual pornography.' In fan fiction communities, and on sites such as Tumblr, all types of sexuality are represented – as well as the absence of a sex drive entirely."

    Do women have distinct experiences in fandom? If you think so, write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: What's a Fanwork?

    Von Janita Burgess am Montag, 17 November 2014 - 5:46pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    OTW Fannews Banner What's a Fanwork

    • NPR's "Pop Culture Happy Hour" featured a look at fanfiction with "resident fan-fiction expert, Petra Mayer" who was asked for some recs. Mayer herself reviewed After, and a discussion ensued among listeners as to whether or not RPF qualified as a fanwork. (Partial transcript available).
    • The Daily Dot featured a video it qualified as a fanwork, a genderswap Ghostbusters. "A bunch of middle schoolers put together a shot-for-shot remake of the original Ghostbusters trailer and managed to make it even better. This time around, boys are playing the roles of Dana and Janine, while the girls have the Ghostbusters and Louis Tully covered, complete with self-aware visual effects and gags."
    • Meanwhile the play Badfic Love focused on fanfic writing groups and their personal dramas. "Director Nick Thornton says this production shows just how much talent WMU theatre graduates have. Thorton says it also encourages artists to keep creating. 'We have so much power and we can go out into the world and create our own reality...In a world full of things that are saying, you know: stay at home, don’t do anything, tear down other people’s work. We’re kind of saying, you know, what is your world? What are you going to do with it?'”
    • Jezebel's interview about mpreg with the male mod of an mpreg site focused more on the interest in the topic than its history in fanworks. "Some of our writers focus solely on the birth while others only gloss over it. Some people love it, some people hate it—much like mpreg itself. The positive and negative aspects of pregnancy are usually always included, and many of our artists are sure to include them in their pieces. Pregnancy is made up of so many emotions, symptoms, and milestones. These are part of the visceral experience pregnancy offers, and our members love talking/drawing/writing about it."

    What examples of fanworks are your favorites? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Guest Post: Jamie Broadnax

    Von Kiri Van Santen am Samstag, 4 Oktober 2014 - 4:54pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Graphic by caitie of an OTW-themed guest access lanyard

    From time to time, the OTW will be hosting guest posts on our OTW News accounts. These guests will be providing an outside perspective on the OTW or aspects of fandom where our projects may have a presence. The posts express each author's personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. We welcome suggestions from fans for future guest posts, which can be left as a comment here or by contacting us directly.

    Today's post is an interview with Jamie Broadnax, founder of Black Girl Nerds , an inclusive site for women who embrace geek/nerd culture. Jamie is the Digital Vice President at the She Thrives Network and has written for Afropunk and Madame Noire.

    What do you find to be the most rewarding thing about fandom blogging?

    Having an opinion on a particular fandom and seeing how others respond to it. Whether they agree or disagree. I'm always interested in other people's perspectives on things even if their point of view contrasts mine.

    You started Black Girl Nerds after googling the phrase in 2012 and finding 0 results. In the past years, though, nerd culture has continued to infiltrate the mainstream. In your experience, is the “nerd” world moving toward racial/ethnic and gender inclusivity? And is inclusivity the goal, or do you believe we should focus on creating our own nerd spaces rather than fighting to be allowed into established ones?

    Excellent question. I would love racial/ethnic and gender inclusivity in nerd culture. It's very important that we see ourselves in comic books, TV shows, tech industries, science conventions, and several other industries that tend to marginalize women of color. However, I'm not completely against creating your own nerd space. BGN was created because of the lack of representation within our subculture. I believe taking the initiative to create your own space is what helps foster growth in spaces that are less diverse. I also think it is important that there are safe spaces on the web where people can connect to a community of individuals that identify and relate to them. It is a form of empowerment that is a basic part of the human condition.

    Where in nerd culture or fandom hasn’t progress been made?

    Mainstream nerd websites and TV shows like "Big Bang Theory". I always find it interesting that by default nerds in media spaces are always white and usually male. The tech space also has a ways to go, but luckily more organizations like Digital Undivided and Black Girls Code are bridging the gap. There is still more work to do and having niche communities like Black Girl Nerds is just the beginning to helping diversify all things in nerd culture.

    What do you think is the most important political/legal/philosophical issue in fandom right now?

    Hmmm...that's a toughie. I don't necessarily associate fandoms with serious political or philosophical ideologies. However, one issue that comes to mind is the issue of race playing a factor in cosplay. Many cosplayers have chatted with me online and on my podcast about dealing with vitriol from non-Black cosplayers. My friend Chaka Cumberbatch, a well known Black female cosplayer, was questioned by white nerds as to why she was cosplaying as Sailor Moon.

    The irony of this bitter criticism is, why are white girls cosplaying as an Japanese character?

    Let that one simmer for a minute.

    What book/movie/show/game/etc are you most excited about right now, and why?

    I'm reading Greg Pak's Storm comic which is awesome. She's my favorite superheroine in the Marvel universe. I'm also interested in starting on The Strain book by Guillermo Del Toro. I'm currently a fan of the TV series and really enjoy live tweeting it on Sunday nights.

    The Organization for Transformative Works is a fan-run nonprofit dedicated to preserving fanworks and advocating for fans. Do you believe that these goals are important? Do fans need advocates?

    I love that concept! Absolutely fans needs advocates. I believe having a partner, team, group, or community that is willing to serve and help you makes us all better people. It helps us to grow, connect, and develop new innovative ideas and to overall just have fun with people who get you. It's important, especially for nerds like us who are used to feeling isolated and excluded because many others didn't share our same fandoms.

  • OTW Fannews: Caution, Advice Ahead

    Von Janita Burgess am Sonntag, 28 September 2014 - 4:13pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    OTW Fannews Caution Advice Ahead

    • Advice columnist Prudie from Slate reassured a mother who discovered her 13-year-old daughter reading "fan fiction for a very popular all boy band which describes in explicit detail sex acts between the male band members." (One guess?) In her response, Prudie reminisced on her own illicit Playboy reading as an adolescent and suggested that the mother address the issue but understand she can't police everything. "Your discovery is the kind of thing that does call for a talk," she wrote, "but first you have to both gather yourself and find your sense of humor." She finished by speculating that "the writers of this series didn't think their most avid fans would be teenage girls!"
    • Of course, not all advice is always well understood. Writer Michelle R. Wood discussed her discovery of the OTW's mission to protect and preserve fanworks but stated, "It's important to remember that technically, all of this work is still illegal. Without authorization from the author, publisher, or studio, a fan work is still in violation of copyright." In fact, as the OTW's Legal Advocacy project often explains, fanworks are creative and transformative, which are core fair uses.
    • Then there's also advice that isn't advice at all, such as a post in The Guardian that raised the hackles of some fanfic writers. Its author later apologized, saying "Piece was meant to be quite tongue in cheek, but as we've presented it as a 'how to' that could be misleading. I know fanfic is a big universe, and people do it for all sorts of reasons, inspired by a ton of different ideas. I love that it exists and as far as I'm concerned the more people that are writing stories the better. Sorry to offend!"

    Have words of wisdom for other fanfic readers and writers? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Putting Out the Welcome Mat

    Von Jennifer Rose Hale am Freitag, 26 September 2014 - 1:57pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Image of male and female icons with text OTW Fannews Putting Out a Welcome Mat

    • At Suvudu, Matt Staggs urged fans to be more welcoming to others. "The first thing that those of us who have identified as geeks or nerds need to accept is that there’s nothing marginal about our interests anymore. Liking comic books, games, collecting action figures doesn’t make me or you or anyone else part of a subculture. Far from it, as a matter of fact: It’s all mainstream. Want proof? Go ask your parents or grandparents if they know what Game of Thrones or The Walking Dead are. Face it: Like the Borg always threatened (the ‘rents probably know about them, too!), we’ve been assimilated."
    • At The Houston Press, Chris Lane was more specific about who should be welcomed. "I personally feel that many of the classic comic mythologies are at least partially to blame. Most of the Silver Age comics that still seem to steer comic fandom's boat started out as wish fulfillment fantasies for powerless teenaged boys. There's a deeply rooted idea that a formerly weak and ostracized protagonist can earn the romantic attention of the girl he wants if he just is heroic enough, in essence 'earning' her affection. The problem is, real women and real romance don't work like that. It's why being a woman's close friend doesn't ensure that the friendship will ever blossom into romance. I think a lot of men have a serious problem understanding that, and accepting that scenario when they encounter it."
    • There are certainly many fans who continue to believe that tests of fannishness are a standard feature of fandom, but at Blackgate Sean McLachlan pointed out why excluding people is not the way to go. "Having celebrated my 45th birthday at this year’s Worldcon, I’m old enough to have seen a lot of these controversies, and they seem to be getting uglier. As women, gays, and ethnic minorities ask for real equality instead of just window dressing, the pushback is getting more venomous. A lot of white guys who claim they’re all for equality get downright nasty when they’re told to actually treat people as equals. This is only making the activists more committed. They say that as female, gay, or black fans, it’s up to them to make the community more equitable. They’re wrong. It’s up to us — straight white men like you and me. We’re the problem, so we need to be the solution."
    • Knowledge at Wharton posted a podcast with Mallika Dutt, who uses pop culture to defeat gender inequality. "I’ve found that using culture to change culture is an effective way of engaging people.  When I say 'using culture,' that includes social media, television, radio, print, short animations, documentaries, street theater, traditional theater and comic books. We’re not focused on one form of storytelling. We use all storytelling forms to bring people into the conversation. Media, arts and technology have been crucial to Breakthrough’s work. We’ve created several multimedia campaigns, three music videos, three video games and multiple documentaries."

    How welcoming have the fandoms you've taken part in been? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Defending Porn

    Von Kiri Van Santen am Mittwoch, 24 September 2014 - 4:01pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    graphic by James Baxter featuring two men kissing

    • io9 shared a slam poem by Brenna Twohy to explain why people love erotic fanfic. "Twohy's message here is a clear and powerful one as she juxtaposes Harry Potter-themed pornography with more mainstream pornography—and how important (and valuable) it is to many consumers of erotic fan fiction that the sex is just one part of a larger story and that they know the personalities, names, and faces behind the genitals."
    • Carolyn Cox at The Mary Sue reviewed porn parodies of Doctor Who and more. "From what I’ve seen of Woodrocket, their adult films do have some similarity to slashfic in that the writers are cognizant of a fandom’s politics and pet peeves. That’s not always the case for porn parodies...there are a lot of ways to get your rocks off on this strange little world of ours, and if any of those ways for you involve certain characters or pop culture entitties (halp!), Wood Rocket likely won’t offend your politics or your fan sensibilities."
    • Hollywood may already be taking note of what The Telegraph discusses about women's interest in gay porn. "That ability to connect seems vital to the legion of women engaging with gay porn. Because they're not just watching it. They're writing it, talking about it - and even directing it. Dore, who has been directing porn for ten years and calls herself a feminist, identifies this new confidence in women's porn-viewing habits as political...“Women have a right to explore their sexuality in the same way that men do,” she adds... But, it's important to consider whether we're just turning the male gaze in on itself. Are women becoming the oppressor instead of the oppressed? Are we just fetishising another marginalised community?"

    How is erotica used in your fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Personal Connections

    Von Jennifer Rose Hale am Donnerstag, 18 September 2014 - 4:53pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Room with lots of Elvis paraphernalia. Text reads Personal Connections

    • NPR profiled the legacy of Elvis fan, Paul MacLeod. His tribute to Elvis's home, dubbed Graceland 2, has become his town's biggest visitor draw. "In 1990, he opened his house to visitors to show off his enormous hoard of Elvis memorabilia. But it soon became clear that the real attraction was MacLeod. YouTube videos give an idea why: MacLeod guided visitors through his house like a deranged carnival barker. He never stopped talking...MacLeod's devotion to 'the king' drove away his second wife and alienated his son. But it also transformed him from mere fan into what Elvis scholar Vernon Chadwick calls an outsider artist."
    • At Zap2It, Boob Tube Dude took note of the 10th anniversary of Lost. "The content of television shows, so this viewpoint goes, is designed to satisfy the cravings of its fans and reward them for viewing loyalty. This viewpoint gets things backwards, however. Television shows are created from a central point of view, and the best ones follow their own muse. The fact that anyone relates to that point of view is something of a miracle, especially in a day and age in which entertainment options are more diffuse and appeal to more distinct demographics than ever. But make no mistake: The idea that any show is creating something specifically for you is an illusion...In the best cases, it creates a symbiosis between audience and show that makes it feel as if the former were made for the latter."
    • New York's Daily News cited a study of Fifty Shades of Grey readers to suggest that their health problems might be interconnected with their choice of books -- at least if they were young. "Amy Bonomi, chairwoman of human development at Michigan State, led the study of 655 women ages 18 to 24. Despite the book's popularity with older women, Bonomi told the News that she studied younger women because their brains are at a critical developmental stage and they are exploring their sexuality more. 'Studies like this have been done before,' she said, noting analyses linking violent television to violent behavior and magazines to body image. '(But) nobody's really done it for fiction.'"

    What sorts of personal connections have you seen in your fandoms? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Knowing the Audience

    Von Janita Burgess am Montag, 15 September 2014 - 4:27pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    OTW Fannews Knowing the Audience

    • Lydia Laurenson wrote for The Atlantic about online anonymity, spurred by the change in Google+'s policy on real names. "I was finding myself on the Internet, but I was also learning skills that would be useful both as a professional and a human offline. My ability to be an effective creator was hugely shaped by writing popular fan fiction and running side-project businesses in virtual worlds. Researchers have also found pseudonymous games to be great environments for training leadership skills...Nowadays, we’re often told that The Future lies in entrepreneurship. I believe that elastic selfhood is crucial for people’s personal development, but it’s important for broader innovation, too. We need space to experiment and risk-tolerant environments where people can learn."
    • Many female fans have hidden their gender in online spaces for some of the reasons that Jen Mac Ramos describes as appearing in hockey fandom. "Plain and simple: being a hockey fan online isn't a safe space for women. In fact, it's downright frightening at times. It's no secret that hockey is notoriously a white bro sport, white as the ice they play on. The boys' club that watches and writes about it is what it is: a boys' club. It's men of all spades who get to dictate what the culture is like. While understandable on the ice (because, well, it is a boys' club in the locker room), why should it extend to how fandom should be? Why should it be around to isolate women?"
    • The media does little to value women as an audience. While suggesting that public conversations on diversity can make a difference, and reporting on problems with representation, the Hollywood Reporter nonetheless wrote about the success of female driven films as a failure of men to go to the movies.
    • At Black Girl Nerds, Jamie Broadnax questioned terms and whether or not they can encompass an entire audience of fans. "A nerd can look like anyone. They look like you or me. However, for women and people of color, are we nerds or anti-nerds? I’m not suggesting we reject the term nerd because I like being called a nerd and I have no qualms about adopting all of what is considered to be a part of nerd culture. However, as a blerd, if I choose to embrace my blerdniess as opposed to generic nerdiness than what does that mean exactly? The blerd community is a place of solidarity for nerds of color. It’s a safe place where we are free to embrace and express our unique sense of self. There is a no-judgment zone within the blerd community and we welcome blerds to cosplay as non-Black characters and for women to have a prolific voice in our community."

    What parts of fandom have you been involved in? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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