Gender and Sexuality

  • OTW Fannews: Find Your Passion

    Von Sarah Remy am Mittwoch, 20 Mai 2015 - 6:11pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Find Your Passion banner red arrows and yellow background

    • The new issue of Cinema Journal was guest edited by the OTW's Kristina Busse and she, along with co-editor of Transformative Works and Cultures Karen Hellekson, contributed articles. The entire issue is available for free online. Topics include articles on fan labor and feminism, fandom's gift culture, Fifty Shades and the "archive of women’s culture," and articles focusing on sampling, vidding, and cosplay.
    • Portland, Oregon's Go Local PDX hosted an article by a college admissions coach about getting writing experience. "Write fan fiction. If you care about an audience and feedback, writing fan fiction can be a great way to get both. Lots of people obsessively read (and comment on) fan fiction about their favorite characters, so a well-written spin-off from a popular novel or series can quickly develop a large readership. In addition, it’s easy to find writing prompts: people on fan fiction forums often run informal contests built around silly topics like 'a Les Miserables-inspired scene with a beach party.' Fanfiction.net is the main hub for this, but a quick search can help you find more specialized sites devoted to particular topics.
    • As a post at Candy Mag pointed out, prompts and fanworks are everywhere. Focusing on content at Pinterest, the post pointed out a variety of fandom crossover fan art exploring various fanwork genres.
    • Cult Noise interviewed Cassie Whitt about her defense of music fangirls. "You should never [be] afraid to be passionate about something. In fact, you should see your ability to do so as a strength most people don’t have. Love music in a way that makes sense to you, and as long as it’s not hurting anyone or yourself, what other people think about it doesn’t matter. And if you’re ever feeling misunderstood or without an outlet for that, find fan communities. All communities have different vibes: some of them will be good, others will suck, and others have the potential to become like a second family."

    Did you use fanfic to prep for college admissions? Are you taking courses about fanworks? Write about fandom and academia in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Doing it New School

    Von thatwasjustadream am Sonntag, 17 Mai 2015 - 6:11pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    curved lines drawn in purple, maroon, orange and yellow over a white background with shades of purple, tan and red filling the spaces between them and the word OTW Fannews Doing it New School written through the right hand side of the graphic

    • DNAInfo reported on workshops that use Sci-Fi, Fan Fiction to Teach Girls STEM and Writing Skills. "'A lot of the series that are popular today, like ‘Hunger Games’ or ‘Divergent,’ feature white characters...We think it’s really important to expose girls to visions of the future that have girls that look like them in leading roles doing the changing.' The project’s namesake, author Octavia E. Butler, inspired the founders to use science fiction as a way to talk about broader issues in social activism, gender, class and race. 'She looked at society through a real critical lens and didn’t sugarcoat anything...It blew me away because I never saw how sci-fi could be used to make me think of history and my own role.'”
    • Olin College professor Allen Downey had some of his students post a Bayesian Survival Analysis in A Song of Ice and Fire on his blog. "Using data from A Wiki of Ice and Fire, we created a dataset of all 916 characters that appeared in the books so far. For every character, we know what chapter and book they first appeared, if they are male or female, if they are part of the nobility or not, what major house they are loyal to, and, if applicable, the chapter and book of their death. We used this data to predict which characters will survive the next couple books."
    • MediaCommons is an academic site that hosts discussion on both courses, research and discussion surrounding reading, writing, and literature. Among the topics is fan fiction, such as this post by Charles Dunbar about learning to write outside one's comfort zone. "I had found the old notebook in which all those stories Colleen had been written into were hastily stuffed, and after reading them over, decided I had done a grave disservice to the character. Yes she was a fan-fiction creation, but she was also part of my writer’s experience, and as such I felt she deserved something more than the role of hostage-girlfriend...So I picked up a pen and began to write. But before I did, I decided to make one little change: rather than approach Colleen as the main character’s girlfriend…I made her the main character."

    Where have you seen appearances of fanworks in academia? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Events Calendar for May 2015

    Von Jennifer Rose Hale am Donnerstag, 30 April 2015 - 12:55pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup for the month of May! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Conferences, Fan Events and Fests, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • May the Fourth (also known as May 4 on the calendar and Star Wars Day in fandom) has become an unofficial Star Wars holiday. As StarWars.com explains, "Say 'May the 4th Be With You' out loud and you’ll hear the pun that Star Wars fans worldwide have turned into a rallying cry to proclaim their love of the saga. It’s the worldwide day to say 'May the Force be with you' to all, and celebrate the beloved Star Wars story that binds our galaxy together." Learn more about Star Wars Day on Fanlore!
    • The Queers and Comics Conference, May 7-8 in New York City, brings LGBTQ cartoonists, comics writers, and artists together with scholars and fans in order to document the history and significance of queer comics. It spotlights the veterans of LGBTQ cartooning in North America and internationally, with forums for working artists to share their knowledge and to discuss how to navigate the comics industry.
    • Miracle Day 2 is a three-day convention celebrating Torchwood. May 8-10 in London, this event will enable fans to meet a selection of the cast and crew of this series as well as create a fantastic social environment for fans of the show. Special guests include John Barrowman, Eve Myles, James Marsters, Naoko Mori, Gareth David Lloyd, Kai Owen, and Owen Teale.
    • FedCon is four full days of "star guests, autographs, photo sessions, lectures, workshops, like-minded people, fans in costumes, activities, parties, merchandise, four days filled with fun." Guests include Sean Young, James Callis (Battlestar Galactica), Tony Todd, and more. The convention is May 21-24 in Dusseldorf, Germany.
    • Billed as "Utah's longest-running general science fiction, fantasy, and horror convention," CONduit features a variety of panels, dealers' room, art show, and numerous contests (including costuming, PSA/trailer, short story, poetry, and "Binary VS. Ewokese"). Guests of honor include Jane Lindskold, author of the Athanor series and Firekeeper Saga; Larry "Dr. Trek" Nemecek; and artist Jessica Douglas. The event is May 22-24 in Salt Lake City, Utah.
    • It's the 10-year anniversary of TimeGate, an annual sci-fi convention in Atlanta that focuses on Doctor Who and British media and culture. This year's guests include actors Michelle Gomez and Katy Manning, props maker Nick Robatto, and science advisor Kevin R. Grazier. The con is May 22-24 in Atlanta, Georgia.
    • Running since 1977, WisCon bills itself as "the world's leading feminist science fiction convention. WisCon, May 22-25 in Madison, Wisconsin, encourages discussion and debate of ideas relating to feminism, gender, race and class. WisCon welcomes writers, editors and artists whose work explores these themes as well as their many fans. We have panel discussions, academic presentations, and readings as well as many other uncategorizable events. WisCon is "primarily a book-oriented convention... with an irrepressible sense of humor."
    • Northwest Fan Fest, May 29-31 in Vancouver, British Columbia, is an annual "celebration of fandom" supported by the West Coast Fan Society. Events include both adult and kid costume contests, a special fandom-related screening by Spike and Mike's Festival of Animation, console and tabletop gaming, and a 19-and-over after-hours party. Special guests include director Uwe Boll, animator Tom Cook, and actor Beverley Elliott (Once Upon a Time and Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants).
    • Sinpozium is a Sydney slash gathering that's been held eight times previously (2000-2002, 2005, 2011-2014). It is a fan-run, not-for-profit, weekend-long party. Sinpozium 2015 will be held on May 30-31.

    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • OTW Fannews: Judging Women's Fandoms

    Von Kelly Ribeiro am Freitag, 24 April 2015 - 5:15pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Womens Fandoms

    • The Global Times of China speculated about the appeal of Mary Sue stories. One reader responded "The reason I like reading and watching Mary Sue stories is because I can be swept away by the beautiful romantic relationships...The heroine doesn't stick to one man, and no one blames her." Her first experience with Mary Sues was in "a piece of fan fiction set in the world of Slam Dunk, a popular Japanese manga comic about a high school basketball team that was adapted into an animation series in 1993. 'The Mary Sue character was the same age as me, and had a similar mentality to life as me, so I was able to perfectly identify with her...[Reading it] was as if I was in the cartoon world myself, and having these romantic relationships with the handsome basketball players.'"
    • At The New Statesman Elizabeth Minkel pointed out that the very same behavior lacked commentary when it was by men but not when it was by teenage girls, or indeed women in general. "Drop into any Top Gear thread online right now and...there’s a genuine outpouring of emotion for the Top Gear that was: these fans, mostly (grown) men, are offering up their vulnerabilities, talking about how the show was always there for them - a comfort, something to look forward to every week...Drop into any 1D thread right now and you’ll notice that even though the language is different, maybe even incomprehensible to you, the sentiment is the same: these fans, mostly (underage) teenage girls, have flooded social media with that same outpouring of emotion, for Malik’s departure or for the end of the group as it’s always existed. It should be easy to have compassion for people who love something and lose it."
    • At The Conversation the focus was on female fans of Australian football. "Our research debunks a couple of persistent myths about women sport fans. These myths concern women’s motivation for attending football, which is commonly explained in terms of their duties as mothers (women support football because it is a 'family' game), or dismissed as something that women do mainly because the men in their life are into footy. These assumptions about why women follow football reinforce some particularly stubborn gender stereotypes." Instead, the study "reveals that while family features significantly in the way women become fans – overwhelmingly women are socialised into following a team through their parents – they develop a connection with and enjoyment of AFL that prevails independently of family."

    Where has the line been drawn between men and women in fan reaction and support? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: For the Fun of It

    Von Janita Burgess am Dienstag, 24 März 2015 - 5:00pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    OTW Fannews banner by Robyn with the text that reads for the fun of it in rainbow tie-dye colours

    • Orangeville.com featured a 12 year old boy who has published Minecraft fanfiction. "The book is presently available in Kindle format...Scott said he hadn’t set out to pen a novel. Rather, he merely doodled the story for fun, something for he and his friends to look over...It wasn’t until his mother encouraged him to continue it that he began to seriously entertain the possibility of a book." While his success has so far been small, it's still been important. "'It’s an awesome experience to know somebody other than my parents liked the book,' he said."
    • Apparently the Cosmo girl is now a fanfic writer. For those yet unpublished fanfiction writers, Cosmopolitan pointed the way to success in fanfiction writing. Included in their 8 steps were "Don't spend too much time coming up with Most Original Story Ever. Just start writing" and "Prove you're a true fan by incorporating Easter eggs."
    • Some have noticed the thin line between gossip and fanfiction, but Tablet Mag offered a look at religion in fanfiction. "[T]hough I am generally dismayed by fanfic about real people (our intern Gabi pointed me to a clueless and shudder-inducing fantasy in which Harry and Louis of the boy band One Direction are a Jew and a Nazi getting hot-n-heavy in a concentration camp), who could object to a wee tale about Jon Stewart inviting Rachel Maddow, Stephen Colbert, Anderson Cooper, and Keith Olbermann to his Seder? Meanwhile, in Hanukkah ficdom, I was utterly tickled by “Chag Sammy-ach,”...that gives us Sam and Dean Winchester, the demon fighters of Supernatural, battling the titular monsters of the award-winning children’s book Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins."
    • The Guardian interviewed author Susie Day about her short story centered on Sherlock fandom and LGBT protagonists. "It’s fair to say, not a lot of research was required for the Sherlock side of the story. And it’s true, Shirin and Candy could’ve been brought together by their mutual love of a cricketing Time Lord and his favourite ginger schoolboy, or quiffy John Smith and his Mister Master… or Sunnydale witches… muppets in space… Spooky and Dana… Dean Winchester and his car…I’m fascinated by reception history: the way that when and how we watch impacts on how we ‘do’ fandom. The Reichenbach Fall was a unique TV event, the agonising wait that followed even more so. For 717 days, continuing that story (how Sherlock did it, what happens when John finds out he’s alive) belonged to fandom."

    Which fandom worlds do you know the most about? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: This Is Your Life

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Sonntag, 15 März 2015 - 4:27pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by Lisa of a young woman looking down at a cell phone and smiling.

    • At xojane, Emily Ansara Baines claimed I Learned Everything I Know About Sex From Reading X-Files Fan Fiction in High School. "Thanks to fan fiction, I didn’t mind some dirty talk. I also finally started to understand how oral sex was supposed to work and maybe even be enjoyable. While anal didn’t intrigue me, thanks to X-Files fan fiction I saw how it could be romantic and not, as my girlfriends told me, demeaning. So, when it came to me actually having sex, I felt prepared. At 16, I was the youngest of my friends to embark on that experience."
    • Rosemarie Alejandrino wrote about her anger at the idea that fanfiction should be hidden. "A friend of mine told me that her parents had lectured her about not reading enough books and wasting all her time on the computer. Then she said to me in confidence, 'I read thousands of words a day, and I can’t tell anybody because … all I read is ‘Glee’ lesbian fanfiction.' And suddenly I was angry. As someone who found solace and comfort in reading, who looked up to the Matildas and the Belles and the Rory Gilmores of the world, I couldn’t imagine what it must be like to be ashamed of reading and to keep such an impactful part of your life hidden from the world."
    • While some students are winning cash prizes for their fanfiction, others decided to teach about it. The Daily Californian featured a story on a pair of undergraduates at UC Berkeley exploring erotic fanfiction. "At a weekly DeCal class called “The Theory of Fanfiction,” students share and explore the forms and themes of fan fiction. Students meet each Monday to discuss the genre’s role in the literary world as well as in society as a whole. Through the class, started this semester by UC Berkeley senior Isadora Lamego and junior Katrina Hall, students explore the history of fandom, the role of social media in developing the genre and fan fiction’s importance in providing a vehicle for alternative sexuality and kink expression."
    • Ten Eighty looked at the line between hearing your audience and turning their interests or identities into an ongoing joke. “There is a possibility of a Queer kid seeing that thumbnail, clicking on it with the hope of their favourite YouTuber coming out as part of their Queer/LGBTQ+ community,” says Jazza. “For the YouTuber to use that click-bait and to then shoot down the possibility of them being Queer as being weird and gross, that’s what made me angry.”

    How have fanworks been part of your life? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Commercial Weirdness

    Von Kiri Van Santen am Donnerstag, 12 März 2015 - 4:29pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    banner by Alice of a cartoon octopus with a book and television set

    • A post at Wired featured images from a new book on science fiction zines of the 1940s through 1960s. "Despite being produced with a limited tool set, and existing in a vastly different milieu, these hacked-together pamphlets laid the groundwork for modern day fandoms. 'The most surprising thing I noticed about the zines was how closely the format—editorials, letters, essays, reviews—paralleled the format of blogs,' says co-author Jack Womack. 'All this stuff is proto-blog, proto-Instagram, proto-snark, proto-troll, and naturally, also an active exchange of ideas that motivated some very weird people to do great things in their life,' adds co-author Johan Kugelberg."
    • The word "weird" seems to be perpetually attached to fanworks, as an article in Yahoo! Movies UK made apparent. The word seems to go missing though when discussing commercial contests, even when they are pitched at underage fans and propose improbable sources. "Mondelez will pick 10 finalists for Wattpad's community to vote on. The company will then turn the winner's story into an animated digital film and promote it on Sour Patch Kids' social platforms. 'We're really just continuing to further build out our relationship with influencers...We know that these are the new celebrities for teens, and they have a much more authentic voice, so we're really putting our brand in their hands and allowing them to create on our behalf.'"
    • Efforts to enroll fans as company pitchmen seem to be booming. A post at Good E Reader spoke uncritically about Skrawl's business model, also directed at kids. It "is already in place in more than 20,000 schools in 60 countries and has been responsible for more than 2 million writing contests, allows story collaboration based on engagement and a points system. One user will post a story, then others will add their own sections to it." Skrawl's CEO stated "[A]s publishers hunger for popular content while cutting promotional budgets, such ready-formed, literate and eBook submissions are likely to become a great place to find talent."
    • Perhaps some of the term's use comes from anxiety. In discussing romance fandom, The Washington Post said, "Fan relations are enormous in the romance world, and romance readers come in all shapes and sizes, from all backgrounds. But they’re almost never male. 'The last thing popular romance needs is a man in a suit ‘mansplaining’ what belongs in the canon,' said DePaul University professor Eric Selinger, the rare man at the conference who actually adores romance fiction...'There are not a lot of us who read these books,' he admitted. 'There’s this thinking that men are not interested in love, which doesn’t make a lot of sense when you look at popular music. For many of the men, they find the books tremendously intimidating.'"

    What terms are you tired of seeing connected to fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Texts

    Von Pip Janssen am Sonntag, 8 März 2015 - 4:48pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    sunset over hills with text saying Fandom Texts

    • At The Conversation, Hannah McCann discussed studying fans of popular culture. "Researchers in the field of romance studies have argued that criticism of the genre often involves patronising female readers. Similar levels of critical concern are rarely turned on texts marketed to male audiences, or those seen as part of high culture. Studying romance fans themselves has been a way to recover the agency of female readers, in part by seeing female fans as active meaning-makers."
    • Media scholar Henry Jenkins and Patrick Galbraith held a conversation on Jenkins' blog In Defense of Moe. "These are people who actively seek alternatives to expectations of men, which is to say assigned sex/gender roles, in relationships with fictional characters. This can take the form of 'marriage' to a fictional character, belonging to a community of shared interest around a character, and so on. Manga, anime and games do not necessarily get us out of hegemonic sex/gender roles, as we have seen from Gamer Gate, but some certainly see that potential. Again, there is Honda Tōru, who argues for a 'moe masculinity' that embraces both the masculine and feminine sides of one’s self, which can be nurtured and accessed in interactions with fictional characters outside of the expectations of society."
    • Syracuse.com wrote about a class on Dr. Who. "More than 200 people (about half SU students, half non-students) enrolled in the live class on the SU campus. About 3,000 people registered for the online class, meaning they can follow the lectures at home, watch the screenings and participate in the class discussions via Twitter and Google+. Rotolo said about 900-1,000 of those online students participate actively."
    • At Edge, Mary Sheehan argued for the significance of One Direction fandom for queer culture. "When both partners are the same gender, both partners have equal power. Young people seeking portrayals of open, equal relationships in media can identify with Larry Stylinson and these kinds of LGBTQIA ships. '[Larry Shippers’] actions are laden with the complexities of our current social climate. They formed a community and collective identity to solve their fears alongside those for the world around them.'"

    What are some of your favorite articles or studies about fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Interacting with Canon

    Von algonquin am Dienstag, 3 März 2015 - 5:12pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    • The it-getters at PBS' Idea Channel released an episode focusing on fanfiction & LGBT representation. "Official writers are...gesturing at alternate universes, at relationships that could exist between characters -- were the world of the show...not what it actually is. I see this as the sacred charge of so much fanfiction, to express the love left unexpressed in so much popular culture." (No transcript available.)
    • Wired's Angry Nerd spoke about why the existence of Fifty Shades of Grey is vital to fanfic. "The key component is fans' passionately engaging with the work and digging more deeply into fictional worlds than their creators ever did." He goes on to discuss how much of what Hollywood is producing is no different than what fans are doing in the way they re-imagine old franchises. (No transcript available.)
    • An article in Vice attempted to identify the reasons behind political fanfiction. "Franke-Ruta discusses the ways that we project our own imaginations and beliefs onto serious considerations of political figures and issues. We do the same with our coverage of sports, culture, and viral news as well—we're constantly granting individuals and events symbology, emotional impact, and an imaginary, packaged takeaway. There are many ways to do this—especially online, where we can create an identity more in line with others' than our own more easily than we can in real life. But fan fiction might be the most extreme example: You are, literally, taking control of reality."
    • While the stories above featured fan art and fanfiction, The Mary Sue tipped fans to a Imgur gif tool. "All you have to do is find the video you want online, plug the URL into Imgur’s new tool, and tell it the start and end points that you want to memorialize forever in a glorious, infinitely looped animation. If the created GIF would be larger than 10MB, Imgur also automatically converts it to a much more efficient GIFV, which is a standard from improved video clips that they’ve been pushing since last year."

    What fanworks have you seen that have had an impact outside fan communities? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Events Calendar for March

    Von Jennifer Rose Hale am Sonntag, 1 März 2015 - 1:30pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup for the month of March! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Conferences, Fan Events and Fests, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • Subtitled "the slash slumber party," Escapade 2015 is celebrating 25 years of bringing slash fans together. The event has three panel tracks--fandom-specific, meta discussion, and tech--and panel discussion is "highly interactive." Attendance to Escapade (March 6-8 in Los Angeles, California, United States) is capped at 150. Read fan impressions of Escapade at Fanlore.
    • Cardboard*Con is "the world's most affordable science fiction / fantasy convention, and the first dedicated to the art of cardboard costuming." The event includes workshops and a costume contest. It's in Atlanta, Georgia, United States, on March 7.

    • Described as a "light-hearted academic conference," the Conference on Middle-Earth 2015 is a single-track conference dedicated to the works of J.R.R. Tolkien. It takes place March 28-29, in Albany, New York, United States.

    • The Pop Culture Association/American Culture Association Joint Annual Conference will include topics related to fandom and fan theory such as fanfiction, cosplay, fan pilgrimages, and more. Mat Fraser, actor (American Horror Story: Freak Show) and disability advocate, will be a featured speaker. The conference is April 1-4 in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States.

    Calls for Papers this month come from:

    • Gendered Politics of Production: Girls and Women as Media Producers. Girls and women are producing more media than ever before, but they face misogynistic backlash in occurrences such as the recent "Gamergate." As part of a one-day symposium at Middlesex University, writers are encouraged to submit papers on themes including, but not limited to, historical analyses of girls and women as media producers; the production and circulation of feminist and activist media texts; gendered labour in media industries; and methodological approaches to studying production cultures. Abstracts of 250 words and a 50-word bio are due March 15; the symposium is June 16.

    • The Fan Studies Network 2015 Conference. The Fan Studies Network is issuing a call for papers and panels for this year's conference. Topics include but are not limited to activism and fandom, fandom and conflict, fan conventions, transculture and fandom, and more. The conference is also accepting expressions of interest in a short "speed-geeking" session, in which a speaker can chair a discussion of a brief idea for feedback. Submissions are due March 22; the conference is June 27-28 in Norwich, United Kingdom.

    • Edited Volume on Non-Professional Subtitling. Non-professional subtitling (sometimes known as "fansubbing") is one of the less-studied forms of user-generated content, arising in the 1980s with the growing popularity of anime in the United States. In this case, "non-professional" doesn't refer to the quality but instead to the type of content produced for distribution online and without profit. Both scholars and practitioners are welcome to contribute papers for a volume on the subject area. Topics can include but are not limited to the non-professional subtitling process, products, communities, and training. Abstracts are due March 31 with full articles due August 30; the volume's anticipated publication date is January 2016.

    Help out a researcher!

    This month we received two requests for research participation:

    The first request is from Arinda Sutantapreeda at Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. She is conducting an online survey on the users of fanfiction websites and the relationship between authors' gender, sexual orientation, and the preference for types of erotic stories.

    Her contact information is arinda [dot] sutantapreeda [at] gmail [dot] com.

    You can find the survey online; note that the latter part of the survey is ages 18 and up only, though all ages can participate in the first half. The research results will be shared with survey participants who provide their email addresses in the survey or who send their email address separately.

    The second request comes from Lidia Wisniewska at the Department of Psychology, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, Poland.

    She is working on a study to find out more about motivation to read (and write) fanfiction, and is asking authors and readers to take a survey. She has Ethical Board approval for this effort as part of a larger project.

    Her contact information is lidiaw [at] umk [dot] pl.

    Survey results are anonymous, and by participating in the survey you are giving consent to have your answers included in the research. Results will be published and available on request.

    If you have requests for research participation, please view our policy for inclusion at our website.


    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

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