Gender and Sexuality

  • OTW Fannews: Getting Along

    Von Janita Burgess am Dienstag, 19 August 2014 - 4:50pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    OTW Fannews Getting Along

    • TIME's James Poniewozik examined why different media fandoms need to play nice. "Outlander the TV series is an adaptation, which Starz–like HBO or AMC or any other adapter–is making for an audience that, ideally, will be far larger than the readership alone. Can you not have a legitimate opinion on them unless you have read the source books–and unless you love the source books and are invested in a series you haven’t yet seen? Are the old fans the true fans, the authentic fans, the authoritative fans? Can you truly appreciate and understand an adaption without reading the source–or is it actually a handicap?"
    • Upworthy pointed to a video which mocked the 'fake geek girl' syndrome by deconstructing the arguments surrounding it. [No transcript available]
    • Adelaide's The Advertiser explored women's problems in comics fandom while also featuring a variety of cosplay pics which provided a good look at the variety of female characters on display. "'We need to realise that every fan has an equal right to be a fan, no matter how much or how little they’ve seen or read.' Ms Scott is confident the enlightenment of male fans is imminent. 'I feel like I’m seeing it already...as more and more girls come through, there’s a greater sense of things being inclusive and celebratory, more light and fun and exciting...Recently I saw someone cosplaying as a Snow White-themed Boba Fett from Star Wars — and when you have a fandom doing that, it’s amazing.' Ms Adams says angry male fans have missed the point. 'Fandom is for everyone, young or old, male or female, and the attitude toward it needs to change.'"
    • The New Statesman asked if 2014 was the year of the fan. "A few months back, I saw a post on Fyeahcopyright, a tumblr about fanworks and legal issues written and edited by lawyers Heidi Tandy and Hannah Lowe...[which] posited that all of this increased attention of and respect for fans could signal 'The Year of the Fan'...A quick google search revealed that there have been a few somewhat feeble-seeming attempts at years of fans in the past – a season-long promotion for an American baseball team, or a series of South Park full of winking in-jokes – but this is more about a collective feeling, some positive momentum, something that’s been gathering steam at an exponential rate recently."

    What do you feel needs celebrating in fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Enduring Effects

    Von Janita Burgess am Sonntag, 17 August 2014 - 5:05pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    OTW Fannews Enduring Effects

    • An Autostraddle post explored the influence of femslash. "I didn’t find femslash until I was 17. I can’t remember the exactly when but I do remember the exactly what: Ginny Weasley and Pansy Parkinson. I noticed that Ginny seemed a lot happier and more alive with Pansy than she ever did with Harry, kind of like how teenage me was noticing that I hated being around boys but was positively radiant in a girl’s presence. You can actually track the evolution of my sexuality with the fanfiction I read and wrote: the more comfortable I became with my hugely gay life, the more hugely gay my bookshelf was, fanfiction included."
    • The Week used tattoos to examine fandom. "As diverse as these tattoos are, they’re all rooted in the same thing: the powerful, deeply personal impact that mass culture can have on our private lives. Tattoos based on fandoms are rarely a simple tribute to the movies or TV shows we love; they’re muses, reminders of a friend, acts of rebellion, testaments to survival. Tattoos may begin with a fandom — but they end with the self."
    • The Celebrity Cafe claimed that Harry Potter fandom will endure. "Ever since Harry Potter 'ended' in 2007, the world has wondered what would happen after. Will the fandom die out? Will the magical world cease to exist? Ultimately, what happens when there are no more books and no more movies? Nothing. Nothing happened. We are alive and thriving just as we were back in 2007. Children are still discovering the stories; movie marathons courtesy of ABC Family are still rampant; and now we have a theme park. We are doing pretty decently if I say so myself. Naturally there have been losses as Mugglenet, one of the top Potter fan sites, did experience a 50 percent drop in viewership since the last film came out and the books have yet to crack a best-sellers list in years but that is no reason to assume the fandom is dissolving."

    What has always stuck with you about fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Studying Fandom

    Von Jennifer Rose Hale am Mittwoch, 13 August 2014 - 4:54pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Person looking through microscope with text reading OTW Fannews Studying Fandom
    • The International Business Times was one of many outlets that wrote about a college course on Game of Thrones. "The students also take turns to lead classroom discussions, which touch on diverse topics including racialism, fanfiction, gender roles and power, identity formation, incest, cultural allegory and, of course, good, evil and the grey area in between. For their final assignment, students will create their own addition to the Game of Thrones saga."
    • A PhD candidate created a website to share her research on fanfiction and is looking for comments. "The Fandom Then/Now project presents research conducted in 2008 and uses it to facilitate conversations about fan fiction's past and future. What do you notice in the data from 2008? What do you think about the intersections between fan fiction and romantic storytelling? Now, in 2014, what has and hasn't changed about fans' reading and writing practices?"
    • The Washington Post wanted to know why female fans scream. "'When men cry at a sports event, it’s very similar' to the screaming that takes place at a One Direction concert, says author Rachel Simmons. 'It wouldn’t be okay for men to do that anywhere else. But the sporting event sanctions that behavior.' Simmons is the author of 'The Curse of the Good Girl,' a book in which she argues that young women are unfairly asked to squeeze into an impossible mold of politeness and modesty. Simmons says a concert is a unique event that gives girls the rare opportunity to break out of those roles. 'In their day-to-day, non-concert-going lives, girls don’t have a lot of permission to scream,' she says. 'A concert offers an oasis from the daily rules about being good girls. Screaming is about letting go and leaving the confines of being the self-conscious pleaser.'"
    • Comics Beat cited a recent study which showed that younger congoers are evenly split between males and females, with a skew toward men among older congoers. "I can’t wait to see the comments talking about how this survey isn’t as valid as something some comcis publishers did 40 years ago, or these fans don’t actually BUY things or they don’t really READ comics and blah blah blah. The truth is: the world is changing and this time it’s for the better." Indeed, for yet another year different media outlets continue to rediscover that fans aren't all male.

    What fandom studies have grabbed you? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Enabled

    Von Jennifer Rose Hale am Samstag, 9 August 2014 - 5:19pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Industrial machinery with text that reads Fandom Enabled OTW Fannews
    • At Aeon Michelle Nijhuis discusses genderswapping with her daughter. "When I first wrote about my daughter’s Hobbit genderswap, many people said that fanfiction writers were way ahead of us, and so they were: Female Bilbo is a familiar fanfic character. My daughter isn’t the first reader who’s wondered what would happen if a girl stepped into Tolkien’s wonderful, timeless story, and I hope she’s far from the last."
    • Public Knowledge noted that Hasbro is now offering the option of fan-made merchandise through 3-D printing. "Many of these types of fan works are likely protected by fair use. But creating and selling My Little Pony figurines is something that, at a minimum, Hasbro could have tied up in lawsuits for years. To its credit, Hasbro decided not to sue this community of super fans. Instead, they found a way to give them a license to create and profit from their creations. Creators on SuperFanArt can now confidently sell fully licensed versions of their works. The community gets the ability to thrive, Hasbro gets to build good will (and, presumably, a cut of sales), and no one gets sued."
    • NBC News also suggested that 3-D printing might revolutionize the toy industry. "These fan creations are enthusiastically shared on the Internet, kind of like fan fiction, in which people write their own versions of stories that they love. These designs are going to circulate anyway, Liverman said, so companies might as well offer them alongside their own and encourage people to interact with their brand....Charles Mire, founder of Structur3d Printing in Ontario, likens the trend to 'cosplay,' where people dress up like their favorite characters."
    • A The New Yorker featured the reason why The Sims became the first game to represent LGBT experiences, and how this was crucial to its success. "During The Sims’s protracted development, the team had debated whether to permit same-sex relationships in the game. If this digital petri dish was to accurately model all aspects of human life, from work to play and love, it was natural that it would facilitate gay relationships." Instead, "[t]he controversy came this year, when Nintendo released, in the West, its Sims-esque video game Tomodachi Life, a game in which same-sex relationships are forbidden. Characters in Tomodachi Life can bicker, flirt, fall in love, marry, and move in together. But, for many gay people, the game’s denial of same-sex relationships reflected real-world systems that had been built to deny their lifestyle and their biology."

    What fandom-made events or works are your favorites? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Events Calendar for August 2014

    Von Kiri Van Santen am Freitag, 1 August 2014 - 4:49pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup for the month of August! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Events, Fan Gatherings, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • Nine Worlds Geekfest 2014 is a "large fan-run multi-genre geek event in London August 8-10. Nine Worlds aims to promote fan-led events, and have conversations with creators (writers, directors) in a safe, diverse environment." All proceeds from the Nine Worlds convention will go to their charity partner English PEN, a charity that supports persecuted writers around the world and is the UK's oldest human rights organization.
    • SMASH! Sydney Manga and Anime Show is a Japanese pop culture convention August 9-10 that is devoted to artists, creators and fans alike. The primary focus is to allow fans to meet and interact with other like-minded people, show off their own creative talents, buy anime and manga related goods, and celebrate their fandom in a social environment. SMASH! encourages all forms of anime fandom through a variety of activities such as cosplay, panels, games, and other special popular culture events.
    • Creatures of the Night is a one day convention August 10 in Sydney, Australia. Teen Wolf fans can participated in Guest Talks, Photo and Autograph sessions, VIP option and lots of fun! Live guests include Holland Roden, Ian Bohen, and Sinqua Walls

      More about Teen Wolf on Fanlore

    • LonCon 2014 will be the 72nd meeting of the World Science Fiction Convention in London August 14-18. It will be the 75th anniversary of the very first Worldcon held in New York in 1939 - something they will be celebrating within their programme and events.

      Loncon 3 will be a celebration of science fiction in all its forms with over 7,000 fans expected, along with hundreds of writers, editors, artists, and other professionals from across the genre.

      Transformative Works and Cultures editor, Karen Hellekson, will be delivering one of the Academic keynote presentations, and will discuss a range of Doctor Who fan videos, including those that recreate missing episodes and reframe post-2005 episodes.

      More about Worldcon on Fanlore

    • Wizard World Comic Con will hit Chicago August 21-24! Chicago Comic Con is a comic and pop culture convention featuring panels involving celebrities, entertainers, and creators from a diverse range of entertainment. Special events, autograph signings, an exhibition hall, and meet and greets. Featured guests include, cast of the Walking Dead, Doctor Who, Marvel Films, and more.

    Calls for Papers this month come from:

    • Fandom: Practices and Participatory Cultures. Fandoms represent participatory communities that are so thoroughly inscribed within our social fabric, and integral to the way many individuals understand their identity, that it warrants holistic study in an interdisciplinary context.

      The 2nd Global Conference on Fandom: Practices and Participatory Cultures facilitates deeper engagements involving participants from across disciplinary and professional backgrounds in explorations of the nature, meaning and implications of fandom as it impacts individuals, fan communities and the societies in which they operate. The Steering Group welcome the submission of proposals for presentations, workshops, preconstituted panels, performances and installations that explore themes such as Intersections between Fandom and Tourism, Fan Practices and Culture, "Understanding the fan" and more. Deadline for 300 word abstract is 15 August 2014.

    • Harry Potter on the Page and on the Screen: Adaptation/Reception/Transformation is an essay collection that proposes to explore the cultural, political, aesthetic, and pedagogical implications of the adaptation of this generation-defining young adult narrative in order to expand our scholarly understanding of this far-reaching international literary and cinematic event, consider what we can learn about the process of cinematic adaptation of literary sources, and facilitate the classroom exploration of the Harry Potter series. Some questions that might be considered:

      · How does the overlapping adaptation history of the Harry Potter series affect theoretical questions of fidelity, interpretation, and transformation in film adaptation studies?

      · In what ways do the novel and movie series represent the same or different narrative universes?

      · How was the dual development of the novel and film series affected by the concurrent development of Web 2.0 and interactive fan culture?

      Interested contributors may email inquiries or one page abstracts by 15 August 2014.

      More about Harry Potter on Fanlore

    • CFP: Otherness and Transgression in Celebrity and Fan Cultures Cultural Transformations Research Group at Aarhus University, located in Aarhus, Denmark, is pleased to announce that qualified research papers are considered for prospective publication in a special issue of the peer-reviewed journal Otherness: Essays and Studies. The notions of otherness and transgression play an essential part in the cultural work and practices celebrities and fandoms perform inasmuch as these concepts are inseparable from the celebrity and fan cultural processes of social in/exclusion, identification and dissociation, uniformity and diversification, and forces both drawing and disrupting demarcations between normalcy and deviance.

      Welcome Topics Include: The Intersection of Celebrity and Fan Studies, Sex, Gender, Sexual Differing, and Queering the Fan / Celebrity Body, Cross-Over Celebrities; Ethnicity, Hybridity, and Fandom in Transcultural Contexts, Social Media and the Construction of Celebrity as Other

      Submit abstracts of no more than 300 words by Friday, August 22, 2014

    Help out a researcher!

    This month we have received two requests for fans to take part in research.

    The first request is from Lucy Baker. She is researching genderswap fanworks (commercial and non-commercial) as part of her thesis and is asking for fans to take a survey about fans' perception and enjoyment of genderswap fanworks. She is also looking for participants to interview as well.

    Her research has been approved by the Griffith University Human Research Ethics Committee and if anyone has any queries they can email her at lucy.baker [at] griffithuni.edu.au or contact her associate supervisor Margaret Gibson at margaret.gibson [at] griffith.edu.au or supervisor David Ellison at david.ellison [at] griffith.edu.au.

    Lucy is also available by Skype at ID mslucybaker, by telephone +61 422 415 238, or by mail at:

    School of Humanities,
    Nathan campus,
    Griffith University,
    170 Kessels Road QLD 4111, Australia.

    The research results will be shared with participants and online as part of her completed thesis.

    Our second request is from Katie Morrissey. She is a PhD candidate at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and is researching fan fiction for her dissertation. She's been researching fan cultures for some time and wants to publicly share some of her research with fans/fan communities and get your comments!

    The Fandom Then/Now website has been launched to share this work. In turn, the project seeks comments and observations from fans on the project and some its ongoing research questions. These comments will be used for research purposes and may be incorporated into the project. Keep in mind that your public comments on this project and the pseudonym you use with them could potentially be used as part of presentations and publications connected to this research, so if this is a concern you can protect your identity to keep your fan pseudonyms out of any publications/presentations.

    Katie's project has been reviewed and granted Exempt Status by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee's (USA) Institutional Review Board. The project identification number is IRB#: 14.399. The UWM IRB may be reached by emailing irbinfo@uwm.edu or calling (414) 229-3173.

    If you have questions about the research, her dissertation advisor is Dr. Tasha Oren. She can be reached at tgoren [at] uwm.edu or through the English Department's phone number at 414-229-4511. Katie can also be reached at fandomthennow [at] katiedidnt.net or morriss9 [at] uwm.edu.

    If you have requests for research participation, please view our policy for inclusion at our website.


    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • OTW Fannews: Global Fandom

    Von Janita Burgess am Montag, 28 Juli 2014 - 5:03pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    OTW Fannews Banner: Global Fandom

    • The story of female volleyball fans in Iran was covered by many sites, including France24. "[T]hese sporting events are only for male eyes, since the 'morality police' — a special police force that seeks to fight 'moral corruption' and to combat those who violate Islamic law — have been systematically preventing women from attending volleyball tournaments since 2005. However, this prohibition does not apply to foreign women." While some women were able to get into games with the aid of foreign fans and by wearing the other team's jerseys, 50 women were arrested for attempting entry. As one woman said, "I don’t want to have to resort to ruses in order to support my team. I want to be able to walk into a sports stadium proud of my identity as an Iranian woman and a fan of my national team."
    • The Korea Times reported on how Korean fans making subtitles were being sued by U.S. drama producers. "Police are now questioning the 15 who were booked without physical detention. Investigators said they made Korean subtitles of American television dramas and movies without getting prior consent from the original producers and circulated their translations among Internet users through large online cafes. A police officer said on condition of anonymity that U.S. television drama producers tend not to exercise their copyrights if individual citizens violate the law. But, he said, the U.S. producers took legal action against illegal subtitle makers as they believed that the violators circulated their subtitles rapidly through the Internet and as a result the original producers experienced negative fallout on their earnings."
    • The Telegraph India talked with fans about their World Cup passions and which countries they supported. "Germany’s clinical 7-1 demolition of Brazil not just reignited the clash of continents at the Fifa World Cup but also confirmed that Calcutta has diversified its allegiance. Germany, The Netherlands, Spain, England, France and Italy now evoke equal passion among the city’s football faithful as the traditional Selecao and La Albicileste." Part of this difference is generational and star driven but "[w]hile age is a rough line of division that splits loyalties, it is not a watertight one. Families too apparently help shape who supports whom."

    What stories do you have to tell about your local fandoms? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Misunderstandings

    Von Kiri Van Santen am Sonntag, 20 Juli 2014 - 5:28pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by Lisa of a street sign that has been knocked down and is pointing arbitrarily.

    • Attack of the Fanboy put a spotlight on gender segregation in gaming tournaments. "Keeping a few tournaments specifically aimed at females is not an ideal situation, but it does allow a woefully underrepresented part of the population a chance to compete on a professional level. To use the IeSF’s own justification for the initial segregation, many major sports use this method as well. Technically women are allowed in the NBA, but due to various reasons none have been placed on a team. That is why the WNBA exists, to allow a group who would be left out, a chance to compete professionally."
    • While some companies recognize their sport is 'for girls', at The Globe and Mail, Amberly McAteer discussed how many just don't get it. "It’s not just professional baseball that thinks women need extra motivation to support the home team. An official women’s T-shirt from the Pittsburgh Penguins went viral on Twitter because it declared that the wearer 'wants the stick' and loves to 'puck.' Because, of course, women are sex objects. Thanks for your sexist contribution, hockey. The Jays Shop, too, carries mildly insulting women’s gear: sequined tanks, 'meet you in the dugout' deep-vees. The only jerseys available in women’s sizes are indeed the players widely believed to be 'cute,' while the men’s section offers exponentially more."
    • A theater company in Charleston, South Carolina created a play about "the dark side of Twilight fandom". "'Kate & Sam Are Not Breaking Up' is a darkly humorous send-up of Twihard culture and celebrity obsession, with a side of gunplay and a dash of Stephen King's Misery thrown in...The lights come up on Kate and Sam waking from unconsciousness, bound and helpless in the apartment of a crazed superfan named Bill (Andre Hinds). It quickly becomes clear that Bill wants tween America's favorite couple to get back together, and he won't let them go until they do. But the situation really goes to hell when 15-year-old Becky...moderator of the fansite ghostforest.net, shows up and starts laying down the law."
    • A CNN report on manga brought about a heated reaction from fans as well as The Comic Book Legal Defense Fund. "As Japan prepares to implement a new law which bans the possession of child pornography but exempts manga and anime, CNN released an over-the-top sensationalist video report this week that demonstrates a profound lack of knowledge about the formats. Much of the report by Tokyo correspondent Will Ripley is devoted to undercover footage of an Akihabara manga shop, which Ripley calls 'a place that caters to young people.' (In fact manga is read by people of all ages.) Over mostly-blurred footage, Ripley describes “magazines and videos so graphic, so sexually explicit, we turned our undercover cameras off.' ...at least one of those blurred-out covers that was too much for CNN’s delicate cameras actually wasn’t pornographic at all.”

    What troubling fandom issues have you come across? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Legal Confusion

    Von Kiri Van Santen am Freitag, 18 Juli 2014 - 5:17pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    • The Washington Post was one of many media outlets covering the U.S. Trademark Office's decision to cancel the Redskins trademark registration. "The 99-page decision by the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board said the team’s name and logo are disparaging. It dilutes the Redskins’ legal protection against infringement and hinders the team’s ability to block counterfeit merchandise from entering the country. But its effect is largely symbolic. The ruling cannot stop the team from selling T-shirts, beer glasses and license-plate holders with the moniker or keep the team from trying to defend itself against others who try to profit from the logo."
    • The Wisconsin State Law Library pointed to a book about trademarks and fan-created content in the wake of the Klinger v. Conan Doyle Estate decision. The book in question is about trademarks and fan-created content from the perspective of trademark owners which doesn’t really acknowledge fans’ rights to make fair uses— but instead is about “tolerating” use. It’s an older work, and an example of the way that trademark owners used to assume that they were always the ones who got to decide how their works would be received.
    • io9 put a spotlight on a study about filk. "Women in the filk community are more likely than men to create original melodies to accompany their lyrics, while women are only somewhat more likely to borrow from others' lyrics than are men. Because filk is often viewed as an imitative culture, the tendency of women to depart from that ethos in creating their own melodies seems significant...female respondents were much more likely to define fair use as not profiting from others' work, and somewhat more likely to define it as giving credit to the original author and making private as opposed to public use of a protected work."
    • The YALSA blog posted about Fandom and Fair Use but made some problematic claims. For example, it does not actually discuss what fair use is and provides questionable examples. Crunchyroll claims to be fully licensed and even Disney has now embraced user-generated content. Instead what the YALSA post demonstrates is an example of copyright confusion: people think that some things aren’t “allowed” when in fact either fair use law or licensing is on their side.

    What confusing legal fandom issues have you come across? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Shining a Light

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Mittwoch, 2 Juli 2014 - 4:03pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by James of a foggy view of trees

    • OTW Fan Video & Multimedia Committee Chair Tisha Turk gave an interview on "the past, present and potential future of vidding and remix culture, and the murky status of fair use – at least when it comes to monetized remixes on YouTube" as well as her own start as a vidder. Discussing copyright claims on fanwork, she said "One possible analogy would be, if I were making a quilt out of various bolts of fabric I purchased, and I cut these pieces, and I piece them together, and add the backing, and I make this lovely quilt, and the people who made the fabrics show up and say: 'I want a cut.' Or: 'You can’t have the profit, I made the fabric, so hand it over.’"
    • The Fandom Post discussed activism around female characters in Star Wars fandom. "Were we wrong to point out our concerns about the first cast photos? Wrong to express dissatisfaction over the lack of Leia in the first wave from the Disney Store? Wrong to share our disappointment that the Star Wars Rebels announcements included the women last and their action figures won’t happen until the second wave? Perhaps if only one of those things had happened, downplaying the outbreak of concern would make sense. It’s never just one thing, though...Staying silent and hoping for the best isn’t the way to create or support change. We need to speak up each and every time."
    • A post at Teleread expressed concern at how site changes can affect writer and reader interaction. "Nobody should have to deal with that kind of abuse, thick skin or not. And it’s sad that it seems to be coming more and more common. It’s in the same vein as the writer who received rape threats for criticizing a comic book cover. How obnoxious our culture has become. We’ve seen time and again that some people use anonymity as a license to be as nasty as they possibly can. It would be great if Fanfiction.net could restore the ability for authors to block anonymous reviews altogether if they wanted. At the very least, the default for reviews after 36 hours should be rejection, not acceptance."
    • A New York Times interview with showrunner Damon Lindelof explored the long-term effects of fan reaction. "Initially, for Lindelof, this kind of fame was very attractive — he interacted eagerly with the fan base of 'Lost,' stoking their expectations and ruminations about the show’s labyrinthine plot...'The longer you tell a story, the larger the stakes have to be,' he says. 'It’s no longer satisfying to say: Are these people who crashed in this plane going to make it out O.K.? Are they going to fall in love? Are they going to live? Are they going to die? It’s like no, are they going to save the world?' In the end, they did save the world, but the way they did it left some faithful viewers unhappy. Cuse has made his peace with this; Lindelof still hasn’t."

    What aspects of fandom do you want to shine a light on? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Uncomfortable Topics

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Sonntag, 15 Juni 2014 - 3:57pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    • At Buzzfeed, Alison Vingiano wrote about the history of trigger warnings. "By the early 2000s, the term had found its way to LiveJournal, where it was used on fan fiction. Gaby Dunn, a writer and early adopter of Tumblr and LiveJournal, said when she was using LiveJournal around 2001, fan fiction communities warned one another of explicit content but seldom used the phrase that has been adopted today. 'When we’d write fan fiction on LiveJournal, we might say, ‘This includes a rape storyline,’ or something, but that phrase [‘trigger warning’] was never used.'"
    • Australia's Star Observer wrote about the Queermance festival "Despite the demographic of those attending, [organizer] Lang stressed Queermance was a queer festival, and most of the authors and industry professionals speaking on panels and delivering workshops came from the queer community. The strange dynamic this created, where queer industry professionals were addressing a mostly-straight audience, was a topic of conversation for festival attendees." Speaking about the ethics of this difference, he argued "'truthfulness' [was] more important when it came to representations of marginalised groups...'I know some of them do feel it’s escapism and why can’t we write the fluffy, romantic stories where men are in touch with their feelings and all that… Can you idealise men? Yes. Can you idealise men to the point where it’s no longer realistic and attainable, and is that desirable? I don’t know.'”
    • A post at Gender Focus by Amy Imhoff discussed Gender, Power and Violence in Fandom. "[W]e wonder why some male geeks want women to be pliable creatures, affirming their life choices by agreeing with them at all times or existing for their visual, sexualized pleasure. If you dare to defy these stereotypes, you are automatically a total bitch who can’t take a joke, needs to lighten up, shouldn’t be upset because any male attention is good attention, or are being dramatic. Even Felicia Day mentioned in her blog post that as a result of her championing the #YesAllWomen hashtag, she knows she’ll get numerous unfollows and trolls bloating the comments by insisting that feminism = hating men."
    • A post at Smart Bitches, Trashy Books also touched on#YesAllWomen and fan conventions. "It took me me a while to see how BayCon, Smart Bitches, and other places, real and virtual, where we share our passions and our stories, intersect with #yesallwomen. They are, in essence, the same thing - flawed, messy spaces in which people struggle to find community, hope, and liberation. They are places in which we gather for support. They are places in which we gather to have our stories heard, and they are places where we struggle to understand our history and create a vision of the future."

    What fandom debates have you heard about? Create some entries for them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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