Gender and Sexuality

  • Events Calendar for August 2015

    Von Janita Burgess am Samstag, 1 August 2015 - 4:37pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup for the month of August! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Conferences, Fan Events and Fests, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • Guests for this year's Texas Comicon include David Prowse and Paul Blake (Star Wars); Robert Axelrod, Barbara Goodson, and Catherine Sutherland (Power Rangers); and John Wesley Shipp (The Flash). Celebrity Q&As, a Halo Tournament, and a costume contest are among the highlights of the event, August 7-9 in San Antonio, Texas, United States.
    • When Words Collide: A Festival for Readers and Writers is an event for readers, writers, artists, and publishers of commercial and literary fiction, including genre, young adult, children's books, and poetry. Guests of honor include Diana Gabaldon (the Outlander series), Faith Hunter (the Skinwalker series), and literary agent Sally Harding. The festival also includes optional pre-festival workshops on manuscript development, plot structure, and more. It's August 14-15 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
    • "Sasquan" is the 2015 World Science Fiction Convention, also known as Worldcon, the annual gathering of science fiction and fantasy fans. Worldcons are the site of the Hugo Awards. The event is August 19-23 in Spokane, Washington, United States.
    • Auto Assembly 2015 is "Europe's largest Transformers convention" and takes place each year in Birmingham, England, United Kingdom. This year's guests include Sumalee Montano and James Horan (Arcee and Wheeljack from Transformers: Prime) and writer James Roberts (More Than Meets the Eye). The event, August 21-23, includes an artists' alley and goodie bags for attendees.
    • Dragon*Con is one of the largest multimedia fan conventions and is held annually on Labor Day weekend in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. This year's Dragon*Con is September 4-7 and features guests John Barrowman (Torchwood), David Ramsey (Arrow), author Mercedes Lackey, Candice Patton (The Flash), Tom Mison (Sleepy Hollow), and Edward James Olmos.

    Calls for Papers this month come from:

    • The Journal of Fandom Studies Special Issue on Ethics in Fan Studies. This special issue aims to examine these and related questions: What should ethics in fan studies look like? Do we need a standard ethical framework? How should fan studies scholars approach ethical issues in their work? What does the future of the field hold? Submit proposals for papers (250-400 words) by August 15.
    • Call for Chapter Proposals: Doctor Who and History. Contributions are being accepted for an edited volume that focuses on Doctor Who and History: A Cultural Perspective. While there have been many publications recently celebrating the show’s longevity, or those reflecting on the programme as a product of the BBC as British institution, this volume focuses specifically on the topic of history. Proposals/abstracts should be 300-350 words in length and submitted by September 1. Accepted proposals will be developed into 5,000- to 8,000-word essays (including notes and references).
    • Call for Participants: Shame, Gender, and Cultural Capital: The Problems of Reading and Writing Fan Fiction. This is a call for participants for a panel at PCA/ACA 2016. There are very specific histories and stigmas associated with women’s writing and reading. Whether it’s a question of popular reading or canon formation, the responses are still the same: “That’s not good for you!” “That’s trashy!" “Why can’t you read Serious Literature?” Instead, the big questions to consider could be: “Why is reading and writing fic a problem for some people?” and “Where does reading fit into participatory culture?” This roundtable would like to discuss how the fan models of women’s writing and its reception is complicated both through genre and fan history. A statement of interest is due September 1.

    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • OTW Fannews: Fangirls in the Wild

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Dienstag, 28 Juli 2015 - 4:00pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by Alice of the top of a face peering out from behind some leaves

    • San Diego Comic Con (SDCC) season means it's time for the media to once again declare that fangirls exist. The New York Times thought this was the year for fangirls. "A bunch of oddballs — nerds and fanboys, toy collectors and cosplayers, gamers and fantasists — invaded the mainstream and planted themselves at the vital center of the entertainment industry...Lately, though, something else has been happening, too — a shift in the ecosystem of fandom symbolized not only by Sadness but also by another new addition to the Comic-Con costume repertory: Imperator Furiosa, the crew-cut, one-armed avenger played by Charlize Theron in 'Mad Max: Fury Road.' Furiosa’s presence amid the Disney princesses and Manga pixies is an especially potent sign of the feminism that is a big part of this event."
    • A more thoughtful article at Refinery29 points out that SDCC is hardly a bastion of feminism yet. "What we’re calling fangirls here covers an admittedly wide and amorphous group of women. They’re cosplayers, comic book collectors, sci-fi nerds, steampunk enthusiasts, booth babes, Lolitas, and more....And they are vocal: When the proportion of female writers and artists for DC Comics plunged from 12 percent to 1 percent in 2011, female fans started a petition for DC to hire more women. DC Comics responded by promising to try. Female fans from a group called the Carol Corps. were also instrumental last year in pushing Marvel to announce plans for a movie about Captain Marvel, a super-powered woman. In other words, fangirls are engaged and numerous, making up a significant portion of the audience that shells out hard-earned dollars to support their pop culture passions. And yet, despite that, this group remains the third estate of the comics / fantasy world."
    • The Chicago Tribune focused more on numbers. "'But when you start to break it down according to how fans identify themselves, we find that no individual fandom is that even,' continues Salkowitz, who will discuss his findings Sunday afternoon at Comic-Con. 'Comics, videogaming, hobby gaming and toy collecting are majority male, usually in the 55- to 60-percent range. Manga/anime, science fiction/fantasy and media fandom are 60- to 65-percent female. Because today's big conventions appeal to fans of everything, audiences coming to shows are pretty much gender-balanced. However, it's still the case that, say, 'comics' fandom tends more toward older guys, whereas manga appeals more to younger women.'"
    • As Neon Tommy pointed out, having female creators representing female fans in the media is a needed step forward. "As for today’s devoted fangirls — who have often been excluded from the full participatory side of media — Jarett says the 'Fan Girl' film's message is one of female empowerment. 'Telulah is a filmmaker,' he says. 'And being a fan of something can also be someone’s art — it’s a form of creative expression.'"

    How many times have you been discovered within fandom? Write about your history in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Altering Reality

    Von Janita Burgess am Sonntag, 19 Juli 2015 - 5:32pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    OTWFannews Banner Altering Reality

    • Geek and Sundry suggested that Gaming Led Us All to Genderbending. "There’s a great deal of imagination and creativity behind genderbending in fandom, fan art, and cosplay, and it can help us identify more strongly with those characters we love. But where does it really come from? Where did we even get the idea to imagine our favorite fandoms with this random character change? While the interest in genderbending can come from a lot of different places, I think gaming had a huge part of making it more widely understood."
    • Eventbrite's latest fandom study examined con attendance and cosplay. "Con-goers are split almost half and half by gender, with males representing 48.7% of fans, and women making up 48.9%. Taking a closer look at these nearly-equal slices of the population pie, we see that single fans are divided by gender almost evenly as well: 50% of singles are male, and 47% are female. But while male singles head to cons alone (29%), the single ladies travel in groups (18%), and go for the cosplay."
    • Malaysian Digest reported that 1 of every 6 K-pop fans is male, but they're often quiet about it. "'I was showing to a friend a music video of Super Junior’s ‘Sorry Sorry’. I was expecting comments like 'wow cool dance moves' or 'it’s catchy', but NO, instead he said, 'why do you listen to this. It’s not like you understand a single thing that they say. Plus they look kinda gay. Are you gay?'...What I don’t understand is why does liking another music genre has got to do with sexual orientation?"
    • Attack of the Fanboy discussed the battling petitions related to the development of Metroid Prime: Federation Force and linked to a video highlighting the fan rage being expressed. "In just under four minutes, Mega64 skewers the mentality behind the Federation Force petition by taking it to an extreme that incorporates elements of Anonymous threat videos with a terrorist-lite militia. It looks like a hard sell on paper, but the over the top nature of every passing second works well on video."
  • OTW Fannews: Similar to Fanfic

    Von Claudia Rebaza am Donnerstag, 9 Juli 2015 - 3:30pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by Kat of multiple typewriters with the sheet in one reading 'OTW Fannews: Similar to Fanfic'

    • An article in The Telegraph discussed how fan speculation in sports fandom is a form of fanfic. "At the heart of fan fiction’s appeal is a sort of wish fulfilment: a subtle remaking of the world in which one’s wildest fantasies can gush uncontrollably to the surface. And while a good deal of fan fiction is sexual in nature, much of it is just quite sweet: charming teenage reveries that begin with a single pleasant idea – 'wouldn’t it be nice if'...In a fortnight's time we see the opening of the transfer window, and yet despite the two being ostensibly unrelated, it strikes me that there are certain similarities between the millions of stories that teenage girls tell each other on Tumblr, and the millions of stories that football will tell itself over the next three months. For the reopening of the summer window marks the ceremonial point at which football subtly shifts in character: from a real game played on the pitch, to a fantasy enacted largely in the imagination."
    • Salon discussed the focus on women in the new season of Halt and Catch Fire. "This season...has an exuberance the first season struggled to reach, and it’s because of a storytelling device that has more popularity in fan fiction archives than Hollywood studios: the gender swap. It’s a thought experiment that pops up in fervent fandoms, ones that are also eagerly reimagining beloved characters in different settings or with new adventures...As with so many elements of fandom, it’s casually subversive—a re-creation that grapples with the social construction of gender and imagines its infinite fluidity. And as with so many elements of fandom, it is a long-standing tradition—one that Shakespeare made regular use of in his plays, which itself was a commentary on the fact that all the female roles were played by men."
    • A guest post in The Japan News explained cover dancing which "is a fun activity in which teams of dancers emulate the moves of Japanese or South Korean idols as they dance to the original music. Spectators cheer for them as if they were the real deal. While cover dancing is gaining more and more fans in Japan, I’ve often met fans in Thailand, Hong Kong and nearby areas, as well as in the United States and Latin America. I think cover dancing is similar to fan fiction for anime and manga in dojin culture, in which fans create their own works using popular manga and anime characters."
    • An article at The Guardian discussed academic analyses of fan activities on Frozen. "Fan responses have boomed on the internet and given rise to myriad readings. In fact, academia now lags behind fans when it comes to subjecting popular culture to intense analysis. The online debate about, say, Mad Men could sustain a conference for weeks. 'Fan studies talks about how carefully and critically audiences discuss texts...The internet has made fan responses so much more mainstream and accessible.' In the past, she says, you would need to do focus groups to yield similar information. 'I think the way in which it’s been really popular with traditionally marginalised communities is specific to Elsa’s characterisation...It can resonate with people who have been ostracised or stigmatised.'”

    What things have you seen compared to fanfiction? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages!

  • Events Calendar for July 2015

    Von Jennifer Rose Hale am Mittwoch, 1 Juli 2015 - 1:53pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup for the month of July! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Conferences, Fan Events and Fests, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • San Diego Comic-Con. You already know if this is something you want to--and can--attend! From the Fanlore entry: "Over the years, Comic-Con has become one of the primary venues for canon creators and stars to announce, create interest for, and sneak preview parts of their 'genre' (not only comics and superhero-related but also science fiction and fantasy) films and television shows." Comic-Con is July 9-12 in San Diego, California.

      This year, OTW Legal chair Betsy Rosenblatt and Legal staffer Heidi Tandy will be on the "Fandom Is My Fandom" panel on Thursday, 5-6 p.m., in Room 14A.

    • RainbowCon is a four-day QUILTBAG (Queer-Questioning, Undecided, Intersex, Lesbian, Trans, Bisexual, Asexual, and Gay) event for anyone and everyone (you do not have identify within the QUILTBAG spectrum to attend or contribute). It's an exciting event that's centered around QUILTBAG media. This includes fiction, fanfiction, nonfiction, comics/webcomics, television, movies, stage, music, and anything else involving QUILTBAG media. It's July 16-19 in Tampa, Florida.
    • Anime Evolution is Vancouver's premier event celebrating Japanese culture, anime, manga, gaming, and every kind of related fandom. The event, July 17-19, features special guests, including Janet Varney and Sarah Williams, interactive panels, live cultural demonstrations, video and tabletop gaming rooms, video rooms, contests, workshops, dances, and more.
    • Artist claims are July 20 for the Het Big Bang challenge. Contributions from any fandom and any het pairing are welcome. Big Bang stories must be at least 25,000 words, and Little Bang contributions, 10,000. Final art and fics are due August 26, with posting on August 31.
    • Fandom and Religion: An International, Inter-disciplinary Conference, held at the University of Leicester, England, July 28-30, will explore interactions between religion and popular culture. How does fandom work? What is happening to fans as they express their enthusiasms and allegiances? Has fandom replaced or become a form of religion? What can the study of religion learn from explorations of fandom? This event will provide an opportunity for participants to explore these and other questions about popular culture and religion in plenary, panel, and short paper sessions.
    • Billed as "the friendliest little convention in New England" and a "diverse collection of geeks," the ninth annual Pi-Con welcomes numerous fandoms: books, movies, gaming, webcomics and print comics, tech and gadgetry, costuming, anime, and music. Highlights include a Writer's Workshop on Friday and expanded filk programming, including a dedicated filk room. The event is July 31-August 2 in Windsor Locks, Connecticut.

    Calls for Papers this month come from:

    • The Comic Electric: A Digital Comics Symposium will be held at The University of Hertfordshire on October 14. Participants are sought to present papers across a wide range of topics that relate to comics scholarship and digital media. Topics may include webcomics, widening readerships, minority voices, and fan cultures, among others. Submit abstracts of no more than 300 words for papers of 20 minutes in length by July 27.

    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • Things to Come at TWC

    Von Kiri Van Santen am Montag, 29 Juni 2015 - 5:22pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by Alice of a book/eReader with an OTW bookmark and a USB plug going into the spine.

    The OTW's journal, Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC), will be celebrating its 20th issue this September. OTW's Communications Committee is at work planning some events to recognize the achievements of our small but extremely hard-working team that has given us several of these issues each year since its launch in 2008.

    But we would also like your help! How would you like to see TWC celebrated? As we plan for a panel discussion and posts, what topics would you like to see discussed? What kind of events would you like to take part in? Let us know!

    In the meantime, TWC has two calls for papers for future issues. The Symposium section in each issue exists for fan contributions, so even if you are not an academic, do consider submitting an essay for these issues! Or help TWC out by spreading the word.

    Special Issue CFP: Sherlock Holmes Fandom, Sherlockiana, and the Great Game (March 2017)

    "This special issue seeks to engage both academics and fans in writing about the older, long established Sherlockian fandom. We welcome papers that address all fandoms of Sherlock Holmes and its adaptations, particularly those that trace the connections and similarities/differences among and between older and newer fandoms.

    We welcome submissions dealing with, but not limited to, the following topics:

    • Questions of nomenclature, cultural distinction, class, race, gender, and sexuality.
    • The role of Sherlockian fandom and the Great Game in fandom history.
    • Academic histories of Sherlockian fandom, both organized and informal.
    • Connections between new adaptation-based fandoms and the older fandom.
    • Fan productions, e.g., pastiche, fan works, and Sherlockian writings on the Canon.
    • Influence of intellectual property law and norms on adaptations and fan productions.
    • Sherlockian publishing, e.g., MX, Titan, BSI Press or Wessex Press.
    • Community, e.g., Sherlockians on the Internet or Sherlockian “real world” gatherings.
    • Specific national fandoms, e.g., Japanese or Chinese Sherlock Holmes reception.

    Read more at their announcement on the TWC site.

    They are also looking for contributions for a special issue on Queer Female Fandom:

    This special issue is the first dedicated to femslash, and it aims to collect and put in dialogue emerging research and criticism on the subject, from histories of lesbian fandom to current fan activities around queer female characters and pairings. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

    • case studies of femslash subcultures and fanworks
    • femslash dynamics and demographics
    • platforms, archives, and communities
    • diachronic or comparative analyses
    • feminist investments in centering women
    • debates about queerbaiting and the politics of visibility
    • queer female authorship in gift/commercial economies
    • transnational circulation of queer female texts
    • yuri (girls’ love) and other non-western femslash iterations

    Read more at their announcement on the TWC site.

    And don't forget to check out the recently released issue 19, "Transnationalism, Localization, and Translation in European Fandom."

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Pushback

    Von Kelly Ribeiro am Freitag, 12 Juni 2015 - 5:04pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Star Trek

    • Some months ago, OTW Legal submitted an amicus brief in the case of Garcia v Google. Now the Ninth Circuit has reversed a panel opinion granting an injunction against Google, on the ground that an actor’s performance was not separately protected by copyright and that the First Amendment should have precluded an injunction. This is a great result for free speech on the internet!
    • In other legal news impacting fans and fandom The Telegraph revealed a proposal for police monitoring of fandom during the late 1990s. "It has emerged that Scotland Yard kept a secret dossier on Star Trek, The X-Files, and other US sci fi shows amid fears that British fans would go mad and kill themselves, turn against society or start a weird cult. The American TV shows Roswell and Dark Skies and the film The Lawnmower Man were also monitored to protect the country from rioting and cyber attacks."
    • The police have hardly been the only ones to mischaracterize fannish practices, as a Gizmodo article assigned credit/blame to X-Files fans for changing fandom. The entertainment industry was slower to change. "Even though the show’s crew was largely interested in the online fandoms, 20th Century Fox took a far harder stance, especially towards fan sites sharing unauthorized images of Mulder and Scully. Fans organized, fighting for their right to post artwork and stories about their favorite characters. Without pushback, the studio could’ve stymied the fan fiction community— as well as remix culture, which is also sometimes attacked as derivative— before it had a chance to take off."
    • On the other hand, Quartz singled out women's continuing contributions to fandom. "Women make up half the human race—including their perspectives makes for richer, better stories. But more than that, the presence of women in fandoms serves as a constant counterpoint to the dreary stereotype of sexless, gross guys huddling in their mothers’ basements. Geeks were never really like that to begin with: all sorts of people have always loved Dr. Who and Mr. Spock and Wonder Woman. The greater visibility of fangirls helps geekdom in general, by showing that there’s no one way to be a fan."

    When have you seen fans push back? Write about those events in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Participation & Representation

    Von Katie am Sonntag, 31 Mai 2015 - 5:00pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Banner by Rachel of a generic newspaper with the OTW logo and the words 'OTW Fannews'

    • Several sites wrote about the effort to #DiversifyAgentCarter which was launched by the tweet 'Someone should create a #DiversifyAgentCarter tag & fill it with facts about the 40’s in New York so the writers have no excuse.'" As the post at Women Write About Comics discussed, "[P]eople began adding stories and photos of women and minorities who played integral roles during World War II and the post-war period, painting a much less white New York City than the one Agent Carter depicts, from Drag Balls to integrated government agencies to plenty of women spies. The hashtag is worth checking out if you’re interested in learning about some forgotten heroes of history."
    • A post at NPR's 'Code Switch' blog added: "Honestly, I blame Black History Month for this. So often, we focus on history that fits within a narrow range: The civil rights movement, the Civil War, American slavery and the transatlantic slave trade. While those are all important pieces of history to focus on, they are not the whole story — and they lead people who've only ever paid attention to black history during February to presume that we did not exist outside of those particular moments in time."
    • UCLA's Asia Institute hosted a presentation on Writing on Star Actresses: Politics, Morality and Literati Fandom in Early Republican Beijing. PhD candidate Jiacheng Liu had focused her dissertation on "how women, previously banned by the Qing dynasty, entered into the male-dominated theater profession and helped to reshape the repertoire and performance, redefine femininity, and facilitate a range of new social and cultural arrangements in the early Republican Beijing."
    • IBN Live recently brought back a more current example of Chinese fandom, this one focusing on 'F.R.I.E.N.D.S'. In an NPR feature, the owner of 2 cafes modeled on 'Central Perk' discussed its popularity. "Reruns of the show serve as a language-learning tool for Chinese university students. The show is particularly popular for its use of colloquial language and as an introduction to American culture. It's also popular because of the laid-back, friendship-filled lifestyle it portrays, far from the stressful, competitive world that Chinese young people inhabit. 'That's why we like Friends...[w]e're looking for this kind of life.'"

    Fanlore could use more content about non-English fandom activities! If you know it, share it -- contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Find Your Passion

    Von Sarah Remy am Mittwoch, 20 Mai 2015 - 6:11pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    Find Your Passion banner red arrows and yellow background

    • The new issue of Cinema Journal was guest edited by the OTW's Kristina Busse and she, along with co-editor of Transformative Works and Cultures Karen Hellekson, contributed articles. The entire issue is available for free online. Topics include articles on fan labor and feminism, fandom's gift culture, Fifty Shades and the "archive of women’s culture," and articles focusing on sampling, vidding, and cosplay.
    • Portland, Oregon's Go Local PDX hosted an article by a college admissions coach about getting writing experience. "Write fan fiction. If you care about an audience and feedback, writing fan fiction can be a great way to get both. Lots of people obsessively read (and comment on) fan fiction about their favorite characters, so a well-written spin-off from a popular novel or series can quickly develop a large readership. In addition, it’s easy to find writing prompts: people on fan fiction forums often run informal contests built around silly topics like 'a Les Miserables-inspired scene with a beach party.' Fanfiction.net is the main hub for this, but a quick search can help you find more specialized sites devoted to particular topics.
    • As a post at Candy Mag pointed out, prompts and fanworks are everywhere. Focusing on content at Pinterest, the post pointed out a variety of fandom crossover fan art exploring various fanwork genres.
    • Cult Noise interviewed Cassie Whitt about her defense of music fangirls. "You should never [be] afraid to be passionate about something. In fact, you should see your ability to do so as a strength most people don’t have. Love music in a way that makes sense to you, and as long as it’s not hurting anyone or yourself, what other people think about it doesn’t matter. And if you’re ever feeling misunderstood or without an outlet for that, find fan communities. All communities have different vibes: some of them will be good, others will suck, and others have the potential to become like a second family."

    Did you use fanfic to prep for college admissions? Are you taking courses about fanworks? Write about fandom and academia in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Doing it New School

    Von thatwasjustadream am Sonntag, 17 Mai 2015 - 6:11pm
    Nachrichtenart:

    curved lines drawn in purple, maroon, orange and yellow over a white background with shades of purple, tan and red filling the spaces between them and the word OTW Fannews Doing it New School written through the right hand side of the graphic

    • DNAInfo reported on workshops that use Sci-Fi, Fan Fiction to Teach Girls STEM and Writing Skills. "'A lot of the series that are popular today, like ‘Hunger Games’ or ‘Divergent,’ feature white characters...We think it’s really important to expose girls to visions of the future that have girls that look like them in leading roles doing the changing.' The project’s namesake, author Octavia E. Butler, inspired the founders to use science fiction as a way to talk about broader issues in social activism, gender, class and race. 'She looked at society through a real critical lens and didn’t sugarcoat anything...It blew me away because I never saw how sci-fi could be used to make me think of history and my own role.'”
    • Olin College professor Allen Downey had some of his students post a Bayesian Survival Analysis in A Song of Ice and Fire on his blog. "Using data from A Wiki of Ice and Fire, we created a dataset of all 916 characters that appeared in the books so far. For every character, we know what chapter and book they first appeared, if they are male or female, if they are part of the nobility or not, what major house they are loyal to, and, if applicable, the chapter and book of their death. We used this data to predict which characters will survive the next couple books."
    • MediaCommons is an academic site that hosts discussion on both courses, research and discussion surrounding reading, writing, and literature. Among the topics is fan fiction, such as this post by Charles Dunbar about learning to write outside one's comfort zone. "I had found the old notebook in which all those stories Colleen had been written into were hastily stuffed, and after reading them over, decided I had done a grave disservice to the character. Yes she was a fan-fiction creation, but she was also part of my writer’s experience, and as such I felt she deserved something more than the role of hostage-girlfriend...So I picked up a pen and began to write. But before I did, I decided to make one little change: rather than approach Colleen as the main character’s girlfriend…I made her the main character."

    Where have you seen appearances of fanworks in academia? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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