Fanfiction

  • OTW Fannews: Looking Back

    By Kiri Van Santen on lunes, 27 October 2014 - 4:26de la tarde
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    Actress Alyson Hannigan posing with her doubles from the Buffy episode Doppleganger

    • Romance writer Keira Andrews discussed how attitudes toward fandom and fan fiction have changed over the years. "Fandom was Fight Club, and we didn’t discuss it with showrunners or actors... Sometimes I really miss the days of having our own secret world, but that horse is out of the barn and galloping out of sight... I honestly think that you have to be a fan to understand fandom. Many people know about fandom now, but they’re still Muggles, if you will. Or maybe Squibs."
    • Celebuzz ranked pop music fan base names. "In the world of pop fandom, it is de rigueur to name the fan base to which you belong (or to have your chosen idol name it for you.) Over the last several years, we have seen groups with nicknames like Little Monsters, Beliebers, and Arianators grow into power and change the way we talk about musicians and their fans."
    • On PasteTV, Amy Glynn talked about how binge-watching Buffy got her through her divorce. "All I wanted was a timeout from my own reality; a break. I wasn’t expecting a breakthrough. But a Joss-curated trip back to growing up showed me some interesting stuff about adulthood. It was also the first step back to my 'real' life, or whatever was going to be real from here on out. The first time around, Buffy made me laugh. This time, it made me see."
    • Keidra Chaney of The Learned Fangirl reviewed rock critic Gina Arnold's book about the 1993 album, Exile in Guyville. "[I]t’s about the culture and mindset of the early 90′s indie rock scene in Chicago and beyond, the hyper-masculine, hyper-obsessive club dubbed 'Guyville' by Phair and others at the time. It’s also about the changes in technology and culture that have changed what it means to be a part of the indie rock scene as a performer or a fan in the past 20 years."

    What changes have you seen in your fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Celebrating Art

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on sábado, 11 October 2014 - 6:05de la tarde
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    Artist painting multiple characters on canvas
    • A Los Angeles art gallery presented exhibited fan art based on the work of Joss Whedon, with Whedon's enthusiastic encouragement. At the opening, Whedon praised the artists and spoke in favour of fanwork: "If I could do this, this is what I'd do. I'd do fan art, I'd do fan fic of the stuff that I love ... I just love the art so much... It's hard to process the idea that it has anything to do with me." [No transcript available.]
    • Norman Reedus of The Walking Dead is saying thank you for "the truck loads of amazing fan art" he receives by publishing a "compilation of artwork made by his fans. The Norman/Daryl archetype is created in tattoo designs, cakes, pencil sketches, mosaics and more ... It’s real art made by real people for real people."
    • FranceTV interviewed Emmanuelle Wielezynski-Debates about her new documentary on fans and fanworks. "Citizen Fan presents people who assuage the need to extend the life of fictional characters (of novels, manga, television, movies, video games etc...) who are important to them." The documentary covers a variety of fandoms and showcases fanworks based on Harry Potter, Disney, manga, and video games, in addition to analysing the "cultural, sociological, economic and also legal" implications of fanwork.
    • Media scholar Henry Jenkins also interviewed Wielezynski-Debates and declared Citizen Fan "may just be the best documentary about fan culture that I have seen." Noting that France is "a country which provided very little protection for fair use and transformative works...I had questions about how a culture built on transformative cultural production would thrive in this particular national context. At a time when many of us in fandom studies have been calling for more work in the global and transnational dimensions of fan culture, it’s exciting to have access to this rich database of how fandom operates in France."

    Have you been moved by multimedia fanworks? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Educated Readers

    By Kiri Van Santen on jueves, 2 October 2014 - 5:51de la tarde
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    Graphic by Lisa of a bookcase and window in a modern library

    • LancasterOnline introduced its readers to the basics of fanfic in an article that gave a broad overview of fic types and issues--good, bad, and ugly. In an interview, a local library employee discussed her history of reading and writing Supernatural fic and shared her experience stumbling across uncomfortable elements: “'There have been times where I’ve come across summaries or some such, you honestly don’t know — should I call the police?' she says, only half-jokingly. Plenty of fan fiction is benign, though, she says, noting, 'You kind of have to wade through.'" The article also covers shipping and alternate-universe fics.
    • Another librarian described bringing fandom into her workplace in Steal This Idea: I Dig Fandom. Autumn Winters described using fandom-based events to draw teen readers into her library for the summer reading program. In addition to asking teens what fandoms they were interested in and researching them online, she wrote, "I also thought about ways to remake previously successful programs with an eye toward fandom. For example, Perler beads to Minecraft pixels or button making to My Little Pony cutie marks." Ultimately, her Doctor Who and Minecraft events turned out to be the most popular.
    • In other Minecraft news, We all know Minecraft draws kids (and adults) to their computers and consoles, but a popular book series is now encouraging kids to read. TheLedger.com reports on a Scholastic guide series that has become popular with the game's target audience. In the article, a parent of a 7-year-old notes that "there are books kids are reading for schools and books that they hopefully like in their free time. And if ‘Minecraft' books are a motivation to read, that's a good thing, right? At the very least, they're developing skills, reading skills." The article also cites the popularity of fanfic and another hit book based on The Legend of Zelda.

    What have been your guides to fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Events Calendar for October

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on miércoles, 1 October 2014 - 7:44de la tarde
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    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup for the month of October! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Events, Fan Gatherings, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • It's the 33rd year for Necronomicon, "Florida's longest-running science fiction, fantasy, and horror convention." Hosted by the Stone Hill Science Fiction Association, this year's event includes gaming, roleplaying, a costume contest, "Necronomi-prom," and a reception with guest of honor and scifi author Eric Flint. It's October 3-5 in Tampa Bay. (Add your Necronomicon experiences to Fanlore!)

    • The Swiss Fantasy Show, October 11-12 in Morges, Switzerland, will feature guests John Rhys-Davies and Adam Brown (from the Lord of the Rings and Hobbit films); Christopher Judge (Stargate SG-1); and Colin Baker (sixth doctor in the Doctor Who series).

    • GeekGirlCon 2014, October 11-12 in Seattle, Washington, gives female geeks and their supporters the opportunity to build a community, share facts and fandom, and learn how they can help promote the role of women and other underrepresented groups in geek culture. (Add your GeekGirlCon experiences to Fanlore!)

    • The spn-Bigpretzel Halloween Reverse "Micro" Bang invites fanfic writers and fan artists to work together on Supernatural creations in the spirit of the (ghostly) season. Art is due October 13, and the claiming of art by writers begins the next day. Works will be posted beginning October 31.

    • Epic-Con Ohio: Geekfest is a con for a cause: The second-annual event is donating $5 from every ticket sold to the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation. Guests include Walter Koenig, Tony Todd, Adrian Paul, Joanna Cassidy, and Lori Petty. This year's event features a special effects contest to award the title of "Best East Coast Indie FX Artist." It's in Dayton, Ohio, October 24-26.

    • EyeCon Vampire Diaries, which bills itself as "bringing our attendees the absolute most 'personal' time with the stars," is hosting its seventh Vampire Diaries convention. At the October 31-November 2 Atlanta event, meet and mingle with cast and creators at Q&As, signings, parties, and more.

    Calls for Papers this month come from:

    • Transformative Works and Cultures No. 20 will be an open, unthemed issue, and general submissions are welcomed. Fans are particularly encouraged to submit Symposium essays (pieces of 1,500-2,500 words that provide insight into current developments and debates). Submission guidelines are available, and the deadline is January 1.


    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • OTW Fannews: Caution, Advice Ahead

    By Janita Burgess on domingo, 28 September 2014 - 4:13de la tarde
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    OTW Fannews Caution Advice Ahead

    • Advice columnist Prudie from Slate reassured a mother who discovered her 13-year-old daughter reading "fan fiction for a very popular all boy band which describes in explicit detail sex acts between the male band members." (One guess?) In her response, Prudie reminisced on her own illicit Playboy reading as an adolescent and suggested that the mother address the issue but understand she can't police everything. "Your discovery is the kind of thing that does call for a talk," she wrote, "but first you have to both gather yourself and find your sense of humor." She finished by speculating that "the writers of this series didn't think their most avid fans would be teenage girls!"
    • Of course, not all advice is always well understood. Writer Michelle R. Wood discussed her discovery of the OTW's mission to protect and preserve fanworks but stated, "It's important to remember that technically, all of this work is still illegal. Without authorization from the author, publisher, or studio, a fan work is still in violation of copyright." In fact, as the OTW's Legal Advocacy project often explains, fanworks are creative and transformative, which are core fair uses.
    • Then there's also advice that isn't advice at all, such as a post in The Guardian that raised the hackles of some fanfic writers. Its author later apologized, saying "Piece was meant to be quite tongue in cheek, but as we've presented it as a 'how to' that could be misleading. I know fanfic is a big universe, and people do it for all sorts of reasons, inspired by a ton of different ideas. I love that it exists and as far as I'm concerned the more people that are writing stories the better. Sorry to offend!"

    Have words of wisdom for other fanfic readers and writers? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Finding the Spark

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on lunes, 22 September 2014 - 5:12de la tarde
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    Silhouette of person with arms raised looking into sunset. Text reads Finding the Spark
    • The Sydney Morning-Herald, in Oz Comic-Con puts the power of the geeks on show, reports on "the obsessive, every-so-slightly bonkers and very influential world of 21st-century pop-culture geekery," including one fan who identifies as a Disney geek and has been to Disneyland 27 times. "You just revel in what you love," says Carissa Avenhouse. "You shop, you meet the fans, you hang out, you watch things, you enjoy the panels, you dress up in your favourite costume or you just wear the T-shirt from your favourite TV show or movie or comic. You're just at one with your people."
    • A podcast on Smart Bitches, Trashy Books, Discussing Fandom from Down Under, features a conversation between the host and an Australian fan over the fun of fandom (including being bitten on the neck by James Marsters!). Guest Nikki says, "I've never met a fandom I haven't liked. I love that whole concept of … that you can find your tribe of something so obscure, and just be you, and love what you love, and be okay." About people who don't understand her fandom, she adds, "They don't get it, and it's really sad not to be passionate about something for you, like, you can be passionate about your kids, but you still need something for you." They also cover the lure of fanfiction and book recommendations for young readers. (No transcript available.)
    • City A.M. reports on Amazon's purchase of Twitch, a platform that allows users to create their own content, as part the new age of "creative consumption," noting that "the plummeting cost of making and distributing your own work means amateur has started to regain its original meaning: not a second-rate imitation of professional work, but the mark of passionate involvement." The article goes on to cover fanfiction, including Archive of Our Own's inclusion of a million works, a recent achievement. While this shift "challenges traditional business models," the article continues, "[p]latforms win out when they build and nurture communities that blend writing and reading."

    What parts of fandom have sparked your imagination? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Founded on Fanworks

    By Kiri Van Santen on miércoles, 17 September 2014 - 4:46de la tarde
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    image by Robyn of James Madison, fourth president of the US

    • Jennifer Parsons wrote at Tech Dirt about fanfic written by one of the U.S. founding fathers. "Why fanfic? What made Madison decide to use existing characters to make his point rather than inventing his own characters like John Arbuthnot did for his own political allegory?...The easiest way to tackle these questions is to tell you an allegorical story. There once was a comic artist, 'Jim M.,' who wanted to comment upon the important issue of CIA torture. To make his point, he drew a three panel comic strip. In the first panel, Captain America is taking down a fanatical Nazi commander who tortured prisoners of war for the good of the Fatherland...In the second panel, Jim M. draws Captain America standing next to President Obama, who is casually observing that although the CIA did 'torture some folks,' the lapse can be excused because the torturers were patriots who loved their country. In the third panel we see Captain America's shadowed face as he walks away from a burning American flag."
    • Although some are very pleased with the offerings on Kindle Worlds, various sites posted a story by Jeff John Robertson at GigaOm about Kindle Worlds' success in light of a presentation by OTW legal staffer, Rebecca Tushnet. "For Amazon and its partners, it will be difficult to overcome such perceptions since the underlying problem is not just about licensing terms, but something more fundamental: the impossibility of having it both ways, of fostering maximum creativity while wielding maximum legal control. As Tushnet notes, Kindle Worlds is hardly the first time that a licensed model of creativity has come up short: the music industry’s imposition of sampling licenses smothered hip-hop in the 1990’s, while commercial controls eroded the popularity of the early fan fiction universe, Darkover."
    • The Fandom Post reported on Dynamite Entertainment being one of the latest companies to go DRM-free. "There will be a slow, focused roll-out over time that will grow the available titles to reflect the vast majority of Dynamite’s library. Throughout its first month of operation, Dynamite will donate ten percent of all sales to the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, a non-profit organization dedicated to the protection of the First Amendment rights of the comics art form and its community of retailers, creators, publishers, librarians, and readers."

    How far back have you seen fanworks go? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanfiction For the Win

    By Janita Burgess on jueves, 11 September 2014 - 4:54de la tarde
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    OTW Fannews Fanfiction for the Win

    • At Crushable Jill O’Rourke discussed how much entertainment is fanfic. "Fanfiction is also present on TV. I’ll give you one flawless example: the entire Once Upon a Time series. It’s practically a show about fanfiction, as it deals with literal alternate universes, multiple versions of characters within the same story, original characters, and crossovers between countless fairy tales, shipping included (and I mean that in the 'They should kiss' way, not in the 'buying something on Amazon' way). People have then gone a step further and written fanfiction around Once Upon a Time. Fanfic-ception!"
    • Blogger Alan Verill wrote about Fan Fiction, Writing, and the Learning Process. "Anyway, all of this to say that perhaps our first reaction to reading someone's lousy fan fiction should not be to mock them. Perhaps we, as a community of writers and readers, should actually be encouraging people to learn and try and grow, as opposed to crushing them under the heel of our Internet mockery. And yeah, I know that's pretty much what the Internet has become these days -- a giant room where everyone takes meth and grabs megaphones and screams at each other without pause. I just think it would be better if we all endeavored to change that, even if only in some kind of small and subtle way."
    • Fictorians posted about trying to become a writer. "If I had it to do over, I’m tempted to say that I’d push myself to start submitting my work sooner. I’m not sure, though, how to pinpoint the time in my life where I was mature enough to not interpret a rejection as a portent of doom, personal insult, or sign of my complete and incurable ineptitude. I’m also grateful for the epic saga I wrote that taught me yes, I do have the ability to write a book’s worth of material. So instead, I’d tell myself to keep in mind that fandom is not a career."
    • At The Mary Sue Emmy Ellis defended badfic. "I’m going to stand up for 'terrible' fanfiction, in all its bizarrities and failures. I’m going to stand up for smut and slash, for utterly pointless fluff, for high school and college alternate universes, for crossovers of either characters or entire worlds, and – I’ll try – for crackfic. You know, the kinds of fanfiction that are brought up when folks try to tar and feather the whole medium with a broad brush. If you bear with me, I might even go so far as to mount a defense for badly-written and ill-conceived fanfiction. And, for your convenience, I’ll do so in that order."

    What fanfiction has made a difference to you? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Terms in Use

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on viernes, 29 August 2014 - 4:57de la tarde
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    Magnifying glass over a dictionary with text that reads OTW Fannews Terms in Use
    • As fandom has become more visible, the terms it uses have spread out into new areas. At this point various bands have written songs titled "Fan fiction" and Australian musician Geoffrey O'Connor has recently titled a whole album "Fan Fiction", while there is also a band with the same name.
    • In one of a constant stream of fanwork contests across the web, Vita.mn discussed their fanfiction entries and made some curious claims. "After weeding out the slashfic (which is to regular fan fiction what '50 Shades' is to 'Twilight')...'Second Player' tells the tale of the Mario Bros. from Luigi’s perspective — only they’re not actually brothers in this otherwise spot-on continuity nod. They’re a couple who fell in love in the days before Pride Parades and Rainbow Road Races, and had no choice but to disguise the true nature of their relationship or face the scorn of the Mushroom Kingdom. If you’re worried that this sounds like slashfic, don’t be. It’s a well-crafted original take on a beloved video-game icon and his less celebrated brother, and it traces their lives together in a way that leaves you rethinking every Mario-branded game you’ve ever button-mashed your way through. The goal of any great piece of fanfic is to enhance the original work, so read 'Second Player,' then go back and play 'Super Mario Bros.' and see if you don’t find it a little more interesting and far more tragic."
    • In an interview with IT expert Taylor Judd about password security, he discussed hacker strategies using a fandom example. "So they'll say, 'Ok it's Joe Schmoe Password123 on Battlestar Galactica fan fiction, the first thing I'm going to do when I see that is I'm going to go to gmail.com and see if that username and password works there." (No transcript available).
    • Of course, fandom is constantly inventing new terms as seen at Richard Armitage Frenzy. "Fandom forensics is when a fangirl (or fanboy) goes into detail mode to solve a mystery. What happened?! When?! Who did it?! Who was there?! Did the tie have a tie clip?! If so, whose was it?!"

    What fandom terms have you seen used (or misused)? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Studying Fandom

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on miércoles, 13 August 2014 - 4:54de la tarde
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    Person looking through microscope with text reading OTW Fannews Studying Fandom
    • The International Business Times was one of many outlets that wrote about a college course on Game of Thrones. "The students also take turns to lead classroom discussions, which touch on diverse topics including racialism, fanfiction, gender roles and power, identity formation, incest, cultural allegory and, of course, good, evil and the grey area in between. For their final assignment, students will create their own addition to the Game of Thrones saga."
    • A PhD candidate created a website to share her research on fanfiction and is looking for comments. "The Fandom Then/Now project presents research conducted in 2008 and uses it to facilitate conversations about fan fiction's past and future. What do you notice in the data from 2008? What do you think about the intersections between fan fiction and romantic storytelling? Now, in 2014, what has and hasn't changed about fans' reading and writing practices?"
    • The Washington Post wanted to know why female fans scream. "'When men cry at a sports event, it’s very similar' to the screaming that takes place at a One Direction concert, says author Rachel Simmons. 'It wouldn’t be okay for men to do that anywhere else. But the sporting event sanctions that behavior.' Simmons is the author of 'The Curse of the Good Girl,' a book in which she argues that young women are unfairly asked to squeeze into an impossible mold of politeness and modesty. Simmons says a concert is a unique event that gives girls the rare opportunity to break out of those roles. 'In their day-to-day, non-concert-going lives, girls don’t have a lot of permission to scream,' she says. 'A concert offers an oasis from the daily rules about being good girls. Screaming is about letting go and leaving the confines of being the self-conscious pleaser.'"
    • Comics Beat cited a recent study which showed that younger congoers are evenly split between males and females, with a skew toward men among older congoers. "I can’t wait to see the comments talking about how this survey isn’t as valid as something some comcis publishers did 40 years ago, or these fans don’t actually BUY things or they don’t really READ comics and blah blah blah. The truth is: the world is changing and this time it’s for the better." Indeed, for yet another year different media outlets continue to rediscover that fans aren't all male.

    What fandom studies have grabbed you? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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