Fanfiction

  • Events Calendar for June 2015

    Jennifer Rose Hale maanantaina, 1 kesäkuuta 2015 - 1:26pm
    Viestilaji:

    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup for the month of June! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Conferences, Fan Events and Fests, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • Signups began May 15 for the Kurt Hummel Big Bang 2015, focusing on the Glee character. Finished fics must be at least 15,000 words long, and any ships and fic types are welcome as long as warnings and ratings are indicated. Author signups close June 15, and artist claims open August 26, with posting beginning October 20.
    • Signups are going on now for the 2015 Wincest Big Bang, which celebrates "the epic love of Sam and Dean" from Supernatural. Written works should be at least 10,000 words (for the "big bang" category) and 5,000 (for the "mini-bang"). Artists, authors, betas, cheerleaders, and pinch hitters are all needed. Author signups close on June 27, and artist claims begin July 19. Participants must be at least age 18.
    • The New York Tolkien Conference is a free conference for fans and scholars of the works of J.R.R. Tolkien. Mythlore editor Janet Brennan Croft and John DiBartolo of the Lonely Mountain Band are the guests of honor, and there will be paper presentations on a variety of topics related to Tolkien. The event is June 13 in New York City. While admission is free, registration is required for campus security to allow access to the conference facilities.
    • Capital Con DC, June 19-21 in Washington, D.C., is a "convention that wants to promote and foster growth in the science fiction and fantasy genres." Sci-Fi Photo Guys will be on hand with a green screen, custom backgrounds, and digital editing to let guests pose for their dream photos. Special events include a formal ball Friday evening and "crossplay pageant." Guests include actor Doug Jones (Hellboy), author Sherrilyn Kenyon, and illustrator Leanne Hannah.
    • Mississippi Comic Con is a two-day event that will bring together a diverse list of guests, vendors, artists, and fan groups, in an affordable, family-friendly environment. Guests include costumer Kristen Hughey, actor and comedian David Della Rocco (Boondock Saints), James C. Leary (Clem from Buffy the Vampire Slayer), and anime voice actor Trina Nishimura. The con is June 27-28 in Jackson, Mississippi, United States.
    • For three years the Fan Studies Network has provided an enthusiastic and welcoming space for academics in all stages of study interested in fans and fandom to connect, share resources, and develop their research ideas. Following the success of their first two conferences, they're announcing a third annual event: FSN2015: The Fan Studies Network Conference, taking place June 27-28 in Norwich, England, United Kingdom. Participate in the discussion on Twitter by following hashtag #FSN2015.

    Calls for Papers this month come from:

    • The UK publisher Intellect is now seeking chapters for the next edition in its Fan Phenomena book series. Fan Phenomena: The Twilight Saga will be an edited collection of essays about the forces that contributed to the global popularity and commercial success of the books, films, and graphic novels of The Twilight Saga. Chapters will explore Twilight’s unique appeal to fans as well as its impact on people, literature, film, music, television, and social issues. Abstracts and author biographies are due June 15; final papers, October 1.
    • Exploring Imaginary Worlds: Audiences, Fan Cultures and Geographies of the Imagination, a special section of Participations: Journal of Audience and Reception Studies, invites contributions that focus on the various ways in which audiences explore, interpret, and respond to imaginary worlds. They are interested in articles that engage with audiences as opposed to speculative accounts or textual analyses--research that maps specific communities and their rich relationships with world-building. The deadline for abstracts of 300 words is June 26, and notifications of acceptance will be sent out the week of July 6.

    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • OTW Fannews: At All Different Angles

    Sarah Remy torstaina, 28 toukokuuta 2015 - 4:27pm
    Viestilaji:

    Fannews banner green chalkboard with pencil and white arrows plus OTW Fannews in red letters

    • A webinar presentation on Open Learning in Fan Fiction Communities was held at the Connected Learning site. Presented by several scholars from The University of Washington Information School, it discussed various aspects of fanfic communities, including a term they developed called 'distributed affect' which described "emotional experiences [that] could also be embodied outside a group and led to significant increases in collaborative creativity." (No transcript available).
    • The Education Institute is also holding a webinar, this one for librarians, titled From Marvel to Middle-Earth: Fanfiction in the Library. The session expected to cover various topics including "background on the various technologies and fan-centred services—such as LiveJournal, Fanfiction.com, Archive of Our Own (AO3), and Amazon Worlds—that have grown up around the movement and how they are used. Participants will also learn how they can be incorporated into a library setting and adapted for programs" as well as "advice on how to incorporate and lead fan-driven creative programming at the library that is exciting, collaborative, and instructional. This includes suggestions for how to structure meetings, encourage participation and creativity in young writers, and provide opportunities to grow and refine literacy skills such as writing and engaging with texts in a constructive way."
    • The University of East Anglia in Norwich held an academic conference on Frozen in May. "The one-day event, or "Symfrozium", on May 12 will be the first day of academia dedicated to Disney's film" and covered "feminism, the film's music, reworking of fairy tales and the role of love, and whether Frozen can be considered a part of the 'Nordic Noir' genre which includes Stieg Larsson’s altogether darker Millennium book trilogy."
    • Stamford, Connecticut's Daily Voice reported on a fandom storytelling event that encouraged participants to show and tell their stories of fandom. "The collaborative storytelling event's theme of fandom was inspired by Jeremy Deller's 'Our Hobby Is Depeche Mode.' Deller's feature-length video piece shows Depeche Mode fans from all over the world and is currently on view in the group exhibition 'It's gonna take a lotta love.'"

    What are your favorite fan studies works about fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Giving Some Credit

    Pip Janssen perjantaina, 22 toukokuuta 2015 - 3:18pm
    Viestilaji:

    Banner showing a cartoon figure holding a book that says I Wrote This!

    • A post at Polygon disagreed with fans' protests about game mods being sold on Steam. "Over and over, it’s been shown that when great content is rewarded with cash, better content flows forward. Of course, more crap will also flow in — but Steam has spent years improving its Workshop system to let the best content filter to the top. Modders will now have a reason to finish their work, and the best modders will find reward in the social aspects of the modding scene — as well as monetarily. The idea that adding a layer of real-world rewards will somehow stifle content is absurd."
    • Notwithstanding the lure of cash, game publisher Bethesda listened to fans and reversed its decision, even refunding earlier purchases. "[W]e underestimated the differences between our previously successful revenue sharing models, and the addition of paid mods to Skyrim's workshop. We understand our own game's communities pretty well, but stepping into an established, years old modding community in Skyrim was probably not the right place to start iterating. We think this made us miss the mark pretty badly, even though we believe there's a useful feature somewhere here...Even though we had the best intentions, the feedback has been clear - this is not a feature you want. Your support means everything to us, and we hear you."
    • Radio.com wrote about the contest run for Mad Men to reproduce its first episode. "Similar fan-made cuts of other movies have taken the internet by storm, including Star Wars Uncut, a project to remake the Star Wars films. That project began in 2009 as a lark by a then-20-something programmer and later went on to win an Emmy for Outstanding Creative Achievement in Interactive Media. Few of these types of crowd-sourced remakes, however, have gone on to be recognized in an official way or aired for millions on TV. This makes Mad Men: The Fan Cut a smart move on AMC’s part to rally Mad Men junkies as the show winds down, allowing them to re-enact favorite scenes and put their efforts back on the same screen that captured their imaginations seven seasons ago."
    • The Media Industries Project "examines the profound changes affecting media industries worldwide, focusing especially on creative labor, digital distribution, and globalization" and looks at what they call connected viewing, which they define as "any product or service that augments the entertainment experience by integrating Internet access, game play, and/or social networking." They look at various changes in entertainment consumption, including "How is connected viewing transforming the relationship of viewers to media content and access?" However, the MIP looks at the issue more in terms of how it challenges entertainment producers than in the relationship between audience and creators.
    • One area where the relationship between audience and creators continues to fail is in fanwork ambushes. Nerd Reactor posted about the latest display of fan art on a TV talk show. While acknowledging that "[s]ome fans have commented on the trend with criticism, saying that it is a way of shaming fans and making celebrities uncomfortable" the title of the article points out the real issue involved -- the lack of participation by fans. If the creator of the fanwork isn't known, it's probably because the media outlet in question failed to make any effort to contact them for permission, as well as failed to credit them on air.

    What sort of creator and fan interactions have been a win or fail in your experience? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Find Your Passion

    Sarah Remy keskiviikkona, 20 toukokuuta 2015 - 6:11pm
    Viestilaji:

    Find Your Passion banner red arrows and yellow background

    • The new issue of Cinema Journal was guest edited by the OTW's Kristina Busse and she, along with co-editor of Transformative Works and Cultures Karen Hellekson, contributed articles. The entire issue is available for free online. Topics include articles on fan labor and feminism, fandom's gift culture, Fifty Shades and the "archive of women’s culture," and articles focusing on sampling, vidding, and cosplay.
    • Portland, Oregon's Go Local PDX hosted an article by a college admissions coach about getting writing experience. "Write fan fiction. If you care about an audience and feedback, writing fan fiction can be a great way to get both. Lots of people obsessively read (and comment on) fan fiction about their favorite characters, so a well-written spin-off from a popular novel or series can quickly develop a large readership. In addition, it’s easy to find writing prompts: people on fan fiction forums often run informal contests built around silly topics like 'a Les Miserables-inspired scene with a beach party.' Fanfiction.net is the main hub for this, but a quick search can help you find more specialized sites devoted to particular topics.
    • As a post at Candy Mag pointed out, prompts and fanworks are everywhere. Focusing on content at Pinterest, the post pointed out a variety of fandom crossover fan art exploring various fanwork genres.
    • Cult Noise interviewed Cassie Whitt about her defense of music fangirls. "You should never [be] afraid to be passionate about something. In fact, you should see your ability to do so as a strength most people don’t have. Love music in a way that makes sense to you, and as long as it’s not hurting anyone or yourself, what other people think about it doesn’t matter. And if you’re ever feeling misunderstood or without an outlet for that, find fan communities. All communities have different vibes: some of them will be good, others will suck, and others have the potential to become like a second family."

    Did you use fanfic to prep for college admissions? Are you taking courses about fanworks? Write about fandom and academia in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Doing it New School

    thatwasjustadream sunnuntaina, 17 toukokuuta 2015 - 6:11pm
    Viestilaji:

    curved lines drawn in purple, maroon, orange and yellow over a white background with shades of purple, tan and red filling the spaces between them and the word OTW Fannews Doing it New School written through the right hand side of the graphic

    • DNAInfo reported on workshops that use Sci-Fi, Fan Fiction to Teach Girls STEM and Writing Skills. "'A lot of the series that are popular today, like ‘Hunger Games’ or ‘Divergent,’ feature white characters...We think it’s really important to expose girls to visions of the future that have girls that look like them in leading roles doing the changing.' The project’s namesake, author Octavia E. Butler, inspired the founders to use science fiction as a way to talk about broader issues in social activism, gender, class and race. 'She looked at society through a real critical lens and didn’t sugarcoat anything...It blew me away because I never saw how sci-fi could be used to make me think of history and my own role.'”
    • Olin College professor Allen Downey had some of his students post a Bayesian Survival Analysis in A Song of Ice and Fire on his blog. "Using data from A Wiki of Ice and Fire, we created a dataset of all 916 characters that appeared in the books so far. For every character, we know what chapter and book they first appeared, if they are male or female, if they are part of the nobility or not, what major house they are loyal to, and, if applicable, the chapter and book of their death. We used this data to predict which characters will survive the next couple books."
    • MediaCommons is an academic site that hosts discussion on both courses, research and discussion surrounding reading, writing, and literature. Among the topics is fan fiction, such as this post by Charles Dunbar about learning to write outside one's comfort zone. "I had found the old notebook in which all those stories Colleen had been written into were hastily stuffed, and after reading them over, decided I had done a grave disservice to the character. Yes she was a fan-fiction creation, but she was also part of my writer’s experience, and as such I felt she deserved something more than the role of hostage-girlfriend...So I picked up a pen and began to write. But before I did, I decided to make one little change: rather than approach Colleen as the main character’s girlfriend…I made her the main character."

    Where have you seen appearances of fanworks in academia? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Celebrations of All Kinds

    Claudia Rebaza torstaina, 14 toukokuuta 2015 - 6:27pm
    Viestilaji:

    Banner by Alice of a laurel wreath and title 'Celebrations of All Kinds'

    • The Chicago Tribune reviewed the play Badfic Love. "Here's what works: all of the fanfic scenes with Connor Konz as Harry and Jake Szczepaniak as a delightfully dumb Draco. You root for these crazy kids, despite the (intentionally) terrible dialogue they're saddled with. It's legitimately funny stuff, mostly thanks to Szczepaniak, who gets the most out every slyly stupid line he's given...The story's creator is winningly played by Cristiana Barbatelli as a confident upstart who can't fully hide her insecurities. The pair meet under false pretenses and fall for each other, and this is where playwright Pasen folds in some noted jabs at the stale, unrealistic conventions of romantic comedy."
    • The BBC reported on a 5 year plan to mark the bicentenaries of the births of the Bronte siblings. In addition to touring exhibitions, a knitted Jane Eyre, and a collection of short stories, "[t]he society said its president Bonnie Greer was 'developing an award named after Patrick Bronte"...and was also working on an initiative with Bradford Council to commemorate Branwell Bronte. The playwright was also making a short promotional film with the museum to 'invite people to come to Haworth during the bicentenary celebrations' and planning a 'Jane Eyre fan fiction" workshop in London."
    • Forbes covered the Star Wars Celebration in Anaheim and attempted to predict the future of its fandom. "Even in a fantasy universe, the lines between fact and fiction are hotly disputed. That’s a good thing. A year ago, Disney decreed that much of the so-called Star Wars expanded universe was, in essence, fan fiction...That didn’t sit well with some die-hard fans, many of whom had become pseudo-history professors of the deepest reaches of Star Wars mythology...Yet even on Wookieepedia, the site home to over 120,000 pages of fan-generated content—much of it concerning storylines now relegated to Legends status—the response hasn’t been negative, at least in terms of engagement. Says Brandon Rhea, a full-time community manager at Wikia, Wookieepedia’s parent company: 'The pageviews in general shot up.'”
    • CBC News took note of the reaction to actor Jonathan Crombie's death. "Plenty of women who were in their adolescence during the late 1980's have indeed been mourning the loss of the handsome man who portrayed Gilbert Blythe on screen — but they're far from alone. It would appear as though, just like the wider Anne of Green Gables franchise, Crombie has continued to rack up new fans from all over the world since the final film aired on CBC TV in 2000...Here are just a few of the ways that fans have been paid tribute to Anne Shirley's 'perfect boyfriend' on Tumblr, on their own blogs and through romantic fan fiction over the years."

    What different kinds of fandom celebration have you seen? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: About and By

    thatwasjustadream sunnuntaina, 10 toukokuuta 2015 - 3:49pm
    Viestilaji:

    Banner with the words OTW fannews and the OTW logo along with lines suggesting an envelope and rows of text on a computer screen

    • Arab Times reported on a new comedy, Ana Maria in Novela Land which features a bodyswapping heroine. "Ana Maria [is] an under-achieving twentysomething who spends far too much time focused on the soap. Between live-tweeting the telenovela while it airs, writing fan fiction featuring its lead characters, and spending almost every waking moment mulling over new plot developments, Ana Maria has little time for anything else." They conclude that the show's "sporadic tweaking of telenovelas and the fans who love them is often quite clever."
    • Caped Crusades featured the fan art of Brazilian artist Rick Celis involving Batman and DC villains. Included were Gotham’s female villains as the Powerpuff Girls, and an Abbey Road take on the Joker.
    • The Hollywood Reporter was one of many sources linking to a Harry Potter parody video with original footage set to the song "Uptown Funk." Created by a group of university students, its quick success may stem in part from J.K. Rowling tweeting that she'd enjoyed it.
    • Dork Side of the Force featured the anime style fanfilm 'TIE Fighter'. "Seriously, the amount of detail in this video is astounding. Some of this stuff, like the detailed interiors of the Star Destroyer and TIE fighters, we’ve never even seen in the films before. And it all looks seamless, even in anime style."
    • A project called OTP The Show has dubbed itself "A new web series about friendship - and smutty Hobbit fan fiction." A trailer is currently available and the first of three episodes will be debuting in April.

    What are your favorite fanworks or works about fans? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Events Calendar for May 2015

    Jennifer Rose Hale torstaina, 30 huhtikuuta 2015 - 12:55pm
    Viestilaji:

    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup for the month of May! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Conferences, Fan Events and Fests, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • May the Fourth (also known as May 4 on the calendar and Star Wars Day in fandom) has become an unofficial Star Wars holiday. As StarWars.com explains, "Say 'May the 4th Be With You' out loud and you’ll hear the pun that Star Wars fans worldwide have turned into a rallying cry to proclaim their love of the saga. It’s the worldwide day to say 'May the Force be with you' to all, and celebrate the beloved Star Wars story that binds our galaxy together." Learn more about Star Wars Day on Fanlore!
    • The Queers and Comics Conference, May 7-8 in New York City, brings LGBTQ cartoonists, comics writers, and artists together with scholars and fans in order to document the history and significance of queer comics. It spotlights the veterans of LGBTQ cartooning in North America and internationally, with forums for working artists to share their knowledge and to discuss how to navigate the comics industry.
    • Miracle Day 2 is a three-day convention celebrating Torchwood. May 8-10 in London, this event will enable fans to meet a selection of the cast and crew of this series as well as create a fantastic social environment for fans of the show. Special guests include John Barrowman, Eve Myles, James Marsters, Naoko Mori, Gareth David Lloyd, Kai Owen, and Owen Teale.
    • FedCon is four full days of "star guests, autographs, photo sessions, lectures, workshops, like-minded people, fans in costumes, activities, parties, merchandise, four days filled with fun." Guests include Sean Young, James Callis (Battlestar Galactica), Tony Todd, and more. The convention is May 21-24 in Dusseldorf, Germany.
    • Billed as "Utah's longest-running general science fiction, fantasy, and horror convention," CONduit features a variety of panels, dealers' room, art show, and numerous contests (including costuming, PSA/trailer, short story, poetry, and "Binary VS. Ewokese"). Guests of honor include Jane Lindskold, author of the Athanor series and Firekeeper Saga; Larry "Dr. Trek" Nemecek; and artist Jessica Douglas. The event is May 22-24 in Salt Lake City, Utah.
    • It's the 10-year anniversary of TimeGate, an annual sci-fi convention in Atlanta that focuses on Doctor Who and British media and culture. This year's guests include actors Michelle Gomez and Katy Manning, props maker Nick Robatto, and science advisor Kevin R. Grazier. The con is May 22-24 in Atlanta, Georgia.
    • Running since 1977, WisCon bills itself as "the world's leading feminist science fiction convention. WisCon, May 22-25 in Madison, Wisconsin, encourages discussion and debate of ideas relating to feminism, gender, race and class. WisCon welcomes writers, editors and artists whose work explores these themes as well as their many fans. We have panel discussions, academic presentations, and readings as well as many other uncategorizable events. WisCon is "primarily a book-oriented convention... with an irrepressible sense of humor."
    • Northwest Fan Fest, May 29-31 in Vancouver, British Columbia, is an annual "celebration of fandom" supported by the West Coast Fan Society. Events include both adult and kid costume contests, a special fandom-related screening by Spike and Mike's Festival of Animation, console and tabletop gaming, and a 19-and-over after-hours party. Special guests include director Uwe Boll, animator Tom Cook, and actor Beverley Elliott (Once Upon a Time and Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants).
    • Sinpozium is a Sydney slash gathering that's been held eight times previously (2000-2002, 2005, 2011-2014). It is a fan-run, not-for-profit, weekend-long party. Sinpozium 2015 will be held on May 30-31.

    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • OTW Fannews: For the Benjamins

    Claudia Rebaza tiistaina, 28 huhtikuuta 2015 - 4:50pm
    Viestilaji:

    Banner by Sidhrat of U.S. $100 bills floating in the air with the title 'OTW Fannews: For the Benjamins'

    • PC Gamer discussed a Half-Life fan's job offer after releasing a popular mod. "Transmissions: Element 120 is a "short single-player" Half-life 2 mod that equips players with a new kind of gravity gun that enables them to leap over buildings and fall from great distances without suffering damage. Taking place after the events of Half-Life 2: Episode 2, it challenges players to figure out where they are and why they've been sent there. On the technical side, it boasts custom levels, code, models, sounds, and a number of upgrades to the Source Engine, including enhanced dynamic lighting, improved support for complex structures, and better AI. And it was all created by one guy."
    • Los Angeles magazine instead suggested that fan films could be personal vehicles. "Fantasy author and captain’s hat aficionado, George R.R. Martin, famously hates fan-fiction based on his Game of Thrones universe, but it’s an uphill battle for Martin, judging by the popularity of his characters amongst online amateur writers with a penchant for sword fights, dragons, and magic. And it’s not just the literary kind Martin has to worry about. Now, fan made videos that either recreate scenes from certain episodes (“The Red Wedding” is a favorite) or spin-offs that feature new characters and plot lines but are still set in the world of Westeros are popping up on YouTube. Some are predictably terrible and a lot like Jack Black and Mos Def’s attempts at recreating their favorite movies in Be Kind Rewind but others are downright genius."
    • There are certainly more commercial projects that are creating spaces for readers to join in with their own contributions. But publishers are also on the lookout for anything that's getting popular. Kidscreen reported on HarperCollins offering a contract to a fanfic writer for his Minecraft series "that’s been making the rounds in middle schools across the US. Wolfe wrote at the first part of the trilogy at age 16 and then self-published it on Amazon.com in January, 2014."
    • Meanwhile Supernatural actors Rob Benedict and Richard Speight, Jr. are creating a show based on their convention appearances. The "crowd-funded show called Kings Of Con — a fictional series that follows an exaggerated version of Rob and Richard...will follow their experiences during their 15 annual international cons, in which the fans aren't the only crazy ones — but the cast is as well."

    Whether projects about fans or projects by fans, is everyone going commercial? Write about those events in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Judging Women's Fandoms

    Kelly Ribeiro perjantaina, 24 huhtikuuta 2015 - 5:15pm
    Viestilaji:

    Womens Fandoms

    • The Global Times of China speculated about the appeal of Mary Sue stories. One reader responded "The reason I like reading and watching Mary Sue stories is because I can be swept away by the beautiful romantic relationships...The heroine doesn't stick to one man, and no one blames her." Her first experience with Mary Sues was in "a piece of fan fiction set in the world of Slam Dunk, a popular Japanese manga comic about a high school basketball team that was adapted into an animation series in 1993. 'The Mary Sue character was the same age as me, and had a similar mentality to life as me, so I was able to perfectly identify with her...[Reading it] was as if I was in the cartoon world myself, and having these romantic relationships with the handsome basketball players.'"
    • At The New Statesman Elizabeth Minkel pointed out that the very same behavior lacked commentary when it was by men but not when it was by teenage girls, or indeed women in general. "Drop into any Top Gear thread online right now and...there’s a genuine outpouring of emotion for the Top Gear that was: these fans, mostly (grown) men, are offering up their vulnerabilities, talking about how the show was always there for them - a comfort, something to look forward to every week...Drop into any 1D thread right now and you’ll notice that even though the language is different, maybe even incomprehensible to you, the sentiment is the same: these fans, mostly (underage) teenage girls, have flooded social media with that same outpouring of emotion, for Malik’s departure or for the end of the group as it’s always existed. It should be easy to have compassion for people who love something and lose it."
    • At The Conversation the focus was on female fans of Australian football. "Our research debunks a couple of persistent myths about women sport fans. These myths concern women’s motivation for attending football, which is commonly explained in terms of their duties as mothers (women support football because it is a 'family' game), or dismissed as something that women do mainly because the men in their life are into footy. These assumptions about why women follow football reinforce some particularly stubborn gender stereotypes." Instead, the study "reveals that while family features significantly in the way women become fans – overwhelmingly women are socialised into following a team through their parents – they develop a connection with and enjoyment of AFL that prevails independently of family."

    Where has the line been drawn between men and women in fan reaction and support? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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