Fan Conventions

  • Events Calendar for December

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on lundi, 1 December 2014 - 5:28pm
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    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup for the month of December! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Conferences, Fan Events and Fests, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • Out With A Bang Big Bang is a six-month, 50,000-word writing challenge celebrating the final season of Glee. Out With A Bang is a return to the novel-length big bangs of old and a final farewell to the show we love (or love to fix). Stories may involve any Glee-centric romantic pairing(s) or have no pairing at all (genfic). Authors will be paired with artists who work with multiple media, including digital art, traditional art, graphics, fanmixes, and fanvids. Sign-ups begin December 1; entries are due July 1, 2015.

      (Know a little, or a lot, about Glee fandom? Contribute to the Glee page on Fanlore!)

    • This month's Fandom First Friday theme is "Follower Celebration!" Come hang out on our Tumblr December 5 and squee with us about the awesomeness of online fandom friends!

    • International Volunteer Day, December 5, is an opportunity for volunteer organizations and individual volunteers to make visible their contributions--at local, national, and international levels.

    • Farragut Fest is two-day event, December 6-7, hosted at the Farragut Films studio in Kingsland, Georgia. It gives attendees a chance to meet the cast and crew of fan-film and -audio productions Starship Farragut, Dreadnought Dominion, ExeterTrek, and others, as well as tours of the "largest free-standing Star Trek (original series) sets on planet Earth!"

    • Artist sign-ups for the NCIS Reverse Bang 2015 close January 1, 2015, and author sign-ups close January 16. (What is a reverse bang?) Find out more about the rules for the event in the FAQ.

    Calls for Papers this month come from:

    • Transformative Works and Cultures' submission deadline is January 1, 2015. Issue 20 will be an open, unthemed issue, and general submissions are welcomed. Fans are particularly encouraged to submit Symposium essays (pieces of 1,500-2,500 words that provide insight into current developments and debates). Submission guidelines are available.


    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom in the Streets

    By Claudia Rebaza on dimanche, 30 November 2014 - 6:25pm
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    Banner by Bremo of a crowd of people

    • Arizona State University's The State Press reported on the PBS nerdwalk in Tempe. The walk "celebrated scientists, mathematicians, Whovians, Cumberbabes, those 'Down for Downton Abbey' and more. The crowd of gold shirts, costumed heroes and cosplayers were led by a team of unicyclers in a show of nerdom appreciation." Its organizer said "'Everybody’s a nerd for something...It doesn’t matter what you’re a nerd for, if you have a passion for chemistry, if you have a passion for vector calculus, if you have a passion for comic books…everybody’s a nerd for something, we think that’s something to celebrate.'”
    • The Pensacola News Journal wrote about another effort to take fandom out of convention halls, the Pensacola Pop Expo. "Government Street was closed to vehicular traffic, and pop-up tents lined the street in front of the historic entertainment complex, allowing hundreds of people to mill about socializing and taking in sights...Cosplayers roamed the street, stopping to pose for pictures between stops at vendor booths. There were plenty of artists, but they were professional comic book artists not just selling art but talking to fans and signing autographs. And those vendor booths were selling nerdy treasures like comics, Funko Pop figurines and vintage video games." The event was funded "with a grant from Arts, Culture and Entertainment Inc., which administers grants to local arts groups. The nonprofit event served as a benefit for Manna Food Pantries."
    • A blog post at Project Muse talked about scenes in the city during the Frankfurt Book Fair. It "is divided into 'trade' days and 'public' days. The trade days, Wednesday through Friday, are full of publishing industry professionals engaged in business-to-business activities. The public is allowed in on Saturday and Sunday...I was at the fair on a public day. There were a lot of teenagers in costume! They were in the fair, on the subway, in the train station, and on the regional commuter trains. I guess it’s 'a thing' to get into character to go to the Book Fair." The post goes on to discuss the site's scholarly content on manga and anime which "shows up in religion, gender, political economy, history, futurism, media and censorship. Popular discussions around manga and anime often include cosplay, fandom (otaku in Japanese), and then bend around to nerd culture, science fiction, and the geek movement."
    • At Bleeding Cool, Hannah Means Shannon wrote about visiting Sleepy Hollow. "I got to see other people enjoying the Sleepy Hollow mythology, their reactions, and the way in which the town celebrates its name day...I now feel I understand better how the imagined past looms large in our present day, how we need it and seek it out at just about every possible opportunity. Washington Irving’s Sleepy Hollow is the quintessential Halloween story just as Dickens’ Christmas Carol is a quintessential Christmas story, a fan favorite for reasons. We can make it our own, and choose to take part in it and that’s down the accessibility of the original material and the creativity of generations of storytellers bringing it to life in new ways for us. And we then follow their lead and address the roots of the tales again to make them our own."

    Where have you unexpectedly run across fandom? Write about your experiences in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Women's Experiences In Fandom

    By Janita Burgess on mercredi, 19 November 2014 - 5:27pm
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    OTW Fannews Banner Women's Experiences in Fandom

    • Comic Book Resources reported on a NYCC panel about female fandom in which Kelly Sue DeConnick said, "'I think that there's an important thing to remember too, that what you're seeing now, the influx of female readership and female creators is not a revolution, it's a restoration...Back in the '30s and '40s there was a girls' magazine that had a distribution of 300,000 copies per month and it was comics... [In the decades since] women were discouraged, dissuaded, made unwelcome, and now for a plethora of reasons, women are returning...There are enough comics for everyone...Say it with me now: equality is not a loss.'"
    • In another panel at New York Comic Con, on harassment and assault, the "crowd was greeted with some sobering statistics...25% of women at cons have reported being sexually harassed, 13% report receiving unwanted, inappropriate comments, and 8% of all attendees have been groped or outright assaulted or raped." This sheds light on the post in The Awl discussing rape charges in web celebrity fandoms, which speculated on the thinking of perpetrators. "Internet celebrity is just another opportunity, like management or teaching or parenthood, to assert power over victims in new and profound ways."
    • Blogger ladyloveandjustice, wrote about why the Mary Sue is a sexist concept. "[O]ne of the CONTROVERSIES listed on the TV Tropes page is if a male sue is even possible. That’s right, it’s impossible to have an idealizied male character. Men are already the ideal. In our culture, male tends to be the default. Women take on the distaff parts. 'Him' and 'mankind' are what humanity are, 'her' and 'womankind' are secondary. Yet this isn’t true for Mary Sue as a term. That name was created first."
    • An article in The Guardian cited fanfic on AO3 and Tumblr as places where teenage girls are the creators of sexual fiction. "'There is a lot of PWP (short for ‘porn without plot’ or ‘plot, what plot?’) out there,' 23-year-old Julia Schnorrer said. 'However, every sex scene in fanfic always has a narrative, since it is integrated in a realm of existing characters. Characters are well-rounded human beings who also have a sex life – not off stage but right in the middle of it. Most fanfic writers are women, and I think it derives from the male gaze that dominates visual pornography.' In fan fiction communities, and on sites such as Tumblr, all types of sexuality are represented – as well as the absence of a sex drive entirely."

    Do women have distinct experiences in fandom? If you think so, write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom is Sharing

    By Janita Burgess on mardi, 11 November 2014 - 5:13pm
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    OTW Fannews Banner Fandom is Sharing

    • At Business of Fashion, Madelin Newman wrote about the rise of fashion fandom. "Jennifer Post, a Black Milk fan from California, has attended every SharkieCon since its inception and said it was unlike anything she had ever seen. 'With what other fashion brand do you have fans of the brand getting together to share in the joy of it all?' she said. 'Sharing styling tips, taking selfies, meeting people in person that you have chatted with online for hours at a time.' The depth of brand advocacy for Black Milk can be felt in the way community members create their own art, songs and photography for the label. One Sharkie even creates her own designs that she sells in a Facebook group called ‘For the love of nylon’ using old Black Milk pieces."
    • At TwinCities.com, the focus was on the shared experience of book fandom. "It's difficult to say whether more teens are reading more fiction than they used to -- but they are talking about books in unprecedented ways. From teen book clubs to social media, attending book signings and filling theaters to see the latest movie based on a young-adult novel, reading has morphed from a nerdy, solitary pursuit into a cool, communal pastime...Authors have become celebrities and there is buzz around books -- much in the same way there was buzz a generation ago around popular TV shows or bands."
    • The Journal Star featured one couple whose shared fandom experience continued into marriage. "'My goal is to become a little old lady in a nursing home with her,' Susanne said. Jennifer, the woman on the couch next to her, has the same wish. They met online, a pair of fan fiction aficionados. 'We’re both super nerds,' says Jennifer, tall and dark-haired, a cat lover and a writer."
    • Apparently shared fandom is so much fun even unrelated corporations want to get in on the act, as noted by The Mary Sue in regards to The Olive Garden twitter account. "Kirsten McHugh and Amy Ratcliffe made this brilliant discovery, and alerted the world to the awesome fan running the Olive Garden’s Twitter account. Olive Garden is definitely into Supernatural, Sleepy Hollow, and Doctor Who (and we can’t blame them). Here’ some of their best tweets."

    What things do you most want to share about your fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Events Calendar for November

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on samedi, 1 November 2014 - 3:20pm
    Message type:

    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup for November! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Conferences, Fan Events and Fests, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • The Lois & Clark Fanfic Archive is challenging fic authors to rewrite an episode set during U.S. Thanksgiving. The holiday-centric challenge is just one month of the archive's annual author inspirations. Submit your stories during the month. (Read about Lois & Clark on Fanlore!)

    • FANdom Con is an anime-focused convention that includes a regional qualifier event for the World Cosplay Summit. Con guests include Scott McNeil (Dragon Ball Z and Gundam), Chuck Huber (Soul Eater and Shin Chan), and Robert Axelrod (Power Rangers and Digimon). It is November 7-9 in Fort Walton Beach, Florida.

    • Shatterdome Con is a fan-run event celebrating Pacific Rim but welcoming other fandoms as well. Guests include Robert Maillet and Heather Doerksen (the Kaidanovskys from Pacific Rim) and Tim Russ (Star Trek: Voyager). It is November 7-9 in Herndon, Virginia.

    • The 2nd Global Conference on Fan Communities and Fandom: Practices and Participatory Cultures facilitates deeper engagements involving participants from across disciplinary and professional backgrounds in explorations of the nature, meaning, and implications of fandom as it impacts individuals, fan communities, and the societies in which they operate. It takes place November 7-10, in Prague, Czech Republic.

    • Supanova Adelaide and Brisbane are billed as "Comic-con, Australian style! Supernova is where the adoring public comes face to face with Supa-Star celebrities and the creative talent that inspire their imaginary worlds under one big roof. The event includes comic books, animation, science-fiction, TV/movies, toys, gaming, fantasy, technology, books, internet sites and fan-clubs, the result is an amazing atmosphere tailor made for expressing your inner geek and where getting into cosplay obvious thing to do!" The Adelaide event is November 21-23, and Brisbane is November 28-30. (Add your Supanova experiences to Fanlore!)

    • The Otherness and Transgression in Celebrity and Fan Cultures conference will look at the emerging fields of celebrity studies and fan studies in a new light, through the veil of otherness and transgression. This conference will bring together scholars to look at the cross-section of these fields, the intersection of their own interests, and hopefully the network of these scholars will form a bridge through which these fields can become more interlinked within scholarship. It's November 21-22 in Aarhus, Denmark.


    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • OTW Fannews: Grabbing the Spotlight

    By Janita Burgess on mercredi, 15 October 2014 - 4:32pm
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    OTW Fannews Grabbing the Spotlight Banner

    • A post by Denise Dorman at Bleeding Cool raised some hackles when she suggested that comics creators were losing money due to cosplay at cons. "Conventions are no longer shows about commerce, product launches, and celebrating the people who created this genre in the first place. I’ve seen it first-hand – the uber-famous artist who traveled all of the way from Japan, sitting at Comic-Con, drawing as no one even paid attention to him, while the cosplayers held up floor traffic and fans surround the cosplayers–rather than the famed industry household name – to pose for selfies. The hard-working artists and creators who are the very foundation of this industry…have been reduced to being the background wallpaper against which the cosplayers pose in their selfies. At what point do you start to wonder if...the general fandom population even gives a shit about the creators more than they care about their Instagram profiles?"
    • Certainly more creators are taking note of the power of fan gatherings to help market their work, such as at Wise Ink Blog. "At a recent book launch in DC, a couple twenty-somethings approached one of our authors and asked if they would be willing to do another event in the future. Talk about a writer’s dream! Not only did they show up to the launch, they wanted to come to another one! But these were not average book launch attendees. They were part of a DC Meetup group called Geeks’ Night Out. Why does that matter? Because they were a built-in audience for the book and we had no idea they existed. The fandom/meetup/Con trend is sweeping the nation and it’s high time that indie authors took advantage of it!"
    • Netflix has been doing various studies on user viewing patterns. Their latest one addressed spoilers and who spoils. "Today, talking about spoilers is just talking about TV; in fact, people aren’t willing or even interested in censoring themselves anymore. McCracken attributes this to better TV storytelling. Over the past few years, writers and showrunners threw out the rulebook, which has created a new and improved TV that is complex and morally challenging. TV has gotten so good that we need to talk about it. McCracken found that as TV evolves, so does the language and behavior of how people talk about their favorite shows. In his research, he identified five personality types -- based on how and why they might convey key plot points to their friends." These include The Clueless Spoiler, The Coded Spoiler, The Impulsive Spoiler, The Power Spoiler and The Shameless Spoiler.

    How are you seeing creators marketing to fans? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Events Calendar for October

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on mercredi, 1 October 2014 - 7:44pm
    Message type:

    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup for the month of October! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Events, Fan Gatherings, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • It's the 33rd year for Necronomicon, "Florida's longest-running science fiction, fantasy, and horror convention." Hosted by the Stone Hill Science Fiction Association, this year's event includes gaming, roleplaying, a costume contest, "Necronomi-prom," and a reception with guest of honor and scifi author Eric Flint. It's October 3-5 in Tampa Bay. (Add your Necronomicon experiences to Fanlore!)

    • The Swiss Fantasy Show, October 11-12 in Morges, Switzerland, will feature guests John Rhys-Davies and Adam Brown (from the Lord of the Rings and Hobbit films); Christopher Judge (Stargate SG-1); and Colin Baker (sixth doctor in the Doctor Who series).

    • GeekGirlCon 2014, October 11-12 in Seattle, Washington, gives female geeks and their supporters the opportunity to build a community, share facts and fandom, and learn how they can help promote the role of women and other underrepresented groups in geek culture. (Add your GeekGirlCon experiences to Fanlore!)

    • The spn-Bigpretzel Halloween Reverse "Micro" Bang invites fanfic writers and fan artists to work together on Supernatural creations in the spirit of the (ghostly) season. Art is due October 13, and the claiming of art by writers begins the next day. Works will be posted beginning October 31.

    • Epic-Con Ohio: Geekfest is a con for a cause: The second-annual event is donating $5 from every ticket sold to the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation. Guests include Walter Koenig, Tony Todd, Adrian Paul, Joanna Cassidy, and Lori Petty. This year's event features a special effects contest to award the title of "Best East Coast Indie FX Artist." It's in Dayton, Ohio, October 24-26.

    • EyeCon Vampire Diaries, which bills itself as "bringing our attendees the absolute most 'personal' time with the stars," is hosting its seventh Vampire Diaries convention. At the October 31-November 2 Atlanta event, meet and mingle with cast and creators at Q&As, signings, parties, and more.

    Calls for Papers this month come from:

    • Transformative Works and Cultures No. 20 will be an open, unthemed issue, and general submissions are welcomed. Fans are particularly encouraged to submit Symposium essays (pieces of 1,500-2,500 words that provide insight into current developments and debates). Submission guidelines are available, and the deadline is January 1.


    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • OTW Fannews: Finding the Spark

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on lundi, 22 September 2014 - 5:12pm
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    Silhouette of person with arms raised looking into sunset. Text reads Finding the Spark
    • The Sydney Morning-Herald, in Oz Comic-Con puts the power of the geeks on show, reports on "the obsessive, every-so-slightly bonkers and very influential world of 21st-century pop-culture geekery," including one fan who identifies as a Disney geek and has been to Disneyland 27 times. "You just revel in what you love," says Carissa Avenhouse. "You shop, you meet the fans, you hang out, you watch things, you enjoy the panels, you dress up in your favourite costume or you just wear the T-shirt from your favourite TV show or movie or comic. You're just at one with your people."
    • A podcast on Smart Bitches, Trashy Books, Discussing Fandom from Down Under, features a conversation between the host and an Australian fan over the fun of fandom (including being bitten on the neck by James Marsters!). Guest Nikki says, "I've never met a fandom I haven't liked. I love that whole concept of … that you can find your tribe of something so obscure, and just be you, and love what you love, and be okay." About people who don't understand her fandom, she adds, "They don't get it, and it's really sad not to be passionate about something for you, like, you can be passionate about your kids, but you still need something for you." They also cover the lure of fanfiction and book recommendations for young readers. (No transcript available.)
    • City A.M. reports on Amazon's purchase of Twitch, a platform that allows users to create their own content, as part the new age of "creative consumption," noting that "the plummeting cost of making and distributing your own work means amateur has started to regain its original meaning: not a second-rate imitation of professional work, but the mark of passionate involvement." The article goes on to cover fanfiction, including Archive of Our Own's inclusion of a million works, a recent achievement. While this shift "challenges traditional business models," the article continues, "[p]latforms win out when they build and nurture communities that blend writing and reading."

    What parts of fandom have sparked your imagination? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Wearing the Mask

    By Jennifer Rose Hale on dimanche, 14 September 2014 - 4:02pm
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    Vintage photograph of people, primarily children, in costume
    • A feature on LonCon in The Guardian discussed various fanworks including filk and cosplay. "While most attendees save dressing up until Saturday night's masquerade, Jonathan Hall, 21, who studies physics at Oxford, spent Friday of the convention fully clad in a homemade Thor costume. For him, while comics breaking out in the mainstream was 'only a good thing,' he said the big comic book and fantasy films made by Hollywood had a lot of catching up to do in terms of representing minority groups in the way the fiction and fan fiction did. 'I'm quite into queer fandom,' Hall added. 'I watched Doctor Who and Torchwood when it came back on television and being 14 at the time and starting to realise I was bisexual, having Captain Jack as a figure on television who become a role model in many ways was a huge help to me. So I think representation is really important and in many ways these big budget movies don't do it as well as books have been doing for a while.'"
    • SyFy interviewed designers who took part in San Diego Comic Con's Her Universe Fashion Show. Asked about whether geek couture is becoming a movement in fashion, one designer replied "Geek culture right now is coming into a really strong time because people are being themselves, they are embracing what they like and embracing who they are...and saying if you don't like it, that's ok because I like myself." (No transcript available).
    • While some fans are creating cosplay for animals, The Inlander profiled cosplay as animals in a piece on Spokane’s First Night. "Escapism is nothing new to the human experience. Ask the guy who drops his paycheck on Zags season tickets, or the people waiting in line for a movie on a Friday night. Ask comic book fans, artists, musicians, gamers, woodworkers, distance runners, Civil War re-enactors, avid fans of Game of Thrones. Odds are they'll all tell you they're just looking for a vacation from the norm, a few minutes when they can forget the bills to pay, the obligations to meet, the 9-to-5, the problems they don't want to address. 'When we fantasize, we experience the same emotions we would feel if we were in reality. Think of the fear you feel with a nightmare. Happy fantasies make us feel good,' says Norman Holland, author of Literature and the Brain and a researcher of psychoanalytic psychology...'Fantasies — escapism — give our emotions a workout. That's why the imaginative arts are good for you.'"

    Have you taken part in cosplay or attended cosplay events? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Every Kind of Fan

    By Janita Burgess on mardi, 2 September 2014 - 4:22pm
    Message type:

    OTW Fannews Every Kind of Fan

    • NPR reported on a K-Pop con in Los Angeles. "[T]alking demographics, Killoren says that most of the 40,000 KCON-goers are girls. Now, you might expect that most of the fans are Korean. 'Most every single person will think that. In fact, most Koreans think that. And they come and they realize we have - less than 10 percent of our audience is Korean.' And Killoren says, that's kind of the point. KCON is a way to give American K-pop fans a taste of something they usually only see on YouTube and to get them caught up in that Hallyu wave." (Transcript available).
    • Portugal News Online reported on an international Cliff Richard con. "Sandra Nicholson, from Newcastle, flew in purposely from the UK for the fundraising event, as did 57-year-old life-long fan Margrit, from Austria. Most of the fans were already well-acquainted, having bumped into each other several times before at a number of the many concerts and events that have been held over the past half a century, since Cliff Richard rocked onto the scene in the late 1950s. Dutch fan Petra de Nie, who runs the Sir Cliff Video Clips website, was also on the cruise, as was Karen Campbell, who possibly had the longest trip of all fans, having travelled with her husband from Brisbane, Australia."
    • Essential Pittsburgh hosted a discussion on "Why Pittsburgh is Geek City, USA" to explain "the start of the Comic Con cultural movement." Comics museum director Joe Wos explained that geek culture was also critical for the growth of cities. "Geek is driving the economy...so I think it's really important for a city to have the attractions, the resources, the sort of things that geeks look for when they move to a city." A caller noted that "Pittsburgh has now had three generations of science fiction clubs all started by women" and Wos added "There was just this huge movement of women who wanted to take comics to the next level." (No transcript available).
    • The Los Angeles Times discussed Outlander's appeal. "The series arrives at a time when Hollywood is acutely aware of the value of female audiences, thanks to 'The Hunger Games,' 'Twilight' and the upcoming 'Fifty Shades of Grey' — projects with passionate, built-in fan bases that have forced the industry to rethink its attitude toward so-called 'chick lit.' And even though while television is thought to be a more female-friendly medium than film, prestige drama remains a realm dominated by male antiheroes. Starz, which last year broadcast 'The White Queen,' another sexy period piece featuring a strong heroine and adapted from a popular historical novel, is specifically trying to reach out to this 'underserved audience' of female subscribers."

    What fandoms have you seen that reach around the globe? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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