Fanfilms

  • The OTW Supports Fan Film Makers

    By Sarah Remy on mercredi, 6 January 2016 - 5:23pm
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    In late December, 2015, Paramount and CBS sued the makers of Axanar, a Star Trek fan film that is intended to be professional quality and has been funded in significant part by Kickstarter and Indiegogo crowdfunding.

    The OTW has no relationship with Axanar or its makers, and we don’t know what the film will be like, so we can’t speak to the merits of this suit in particular. But we are troubled by much of Paramount’s Complaint, which we believe is based on a fundamental misunderstanding of fair use law. U.S. copyright law identifies several factors to consider in determining whether a new work based on a preexisting work is fair use, including (1) whether the new work transforms the meaning or purpose of the original, (2) whether the new work is noncommercial (that is, not made for profit), (3) how much of the original work the new work copies, and (4) whether the new work competes in the market with the original work.

    Fair use favors works that are noncommercial and not sold for a profit; that are transformative, adding new meaning or messages to the original; that are limited, not copying the entirety of the original; and that do not substitute for the original work. None of these factors is absolutely necessary for fair use, but they all help, and we believe that noncommercial fan films that use discrete elements from original works and add new meaning to them are precisely the kinds of works that the law should encourage. The fact that the hosting or creation of a work may be funded by one person, or crowdfunded by many people, doesn’t make the resulting work commercial. And the fact that a fanwork is high-quality or expensive to produce does not undermine the fact that it is fair use.

    We hope that copyright owners agree with us: fanworks often add to the markets for original copyrighted works, rather than competing with them. The OTW strongly believes that Paramount should be supporting the creators of noncommercial fan films, not threatening them.

    For more information on the OTW’s position on copyright, fanworks, and fair use, see the “Legal” section of the OTW FAQ. OTW Legal will continue to watch the progress of this lawsuit.

  • OTW Fannews: Paying Tribute

    By Claudia Rebaza on mardi, 29 December 2015 - 5:14pm
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    • Canada's National Post reported on the 141st birthday of Lucy Maud Montgomery by citing not only the various incarnations and tributes to Anne of Green Gables but also its fanfiction. "Anne fans are pretty prolific in the fan fiction department, filling up the corners of the Internet with stories devoted to Anne’s experiences with postpartum depression or Anne and Gilbert’s romance (some are not as...chaste as the originals)."
    • Tech Times reported on a Hannibal anthology of fanworks. "So, why focus on fan fiction surrounding Hannibal? 'It was a combination of both my interest in starting a fandom press in general and my love and admiration for the show,' Fleck said. 'After doing Brooklyn last year, I knew I wanted to eventually attempt another fanbook, but I had planned on waiting at least another year before doing it due to the time commitment. Watching Season 3 of Hannibal unfold changed that plan — the finale was the nail in the coffin, I knew Hannibal was something really special and I wanted to do a Hannibal book.'"
    • WhoSay wrote about the short film "Fan Friction” produced for RocketJump: The Show. "The opportunity to have a story about two female characters and their friendship was really important, particularly because in geek and nerd culture there's a lot of hostility towards women historically. So it was an important and deliberate choice to make it two female characters. The goal with the short was to make it a love letter to female fans of nerdy stuff. Ideally that will make them feel included into a world where they are often excluded from."
    • Deadline wrote about a planned documentary focusing on Phantom of the Paradise fandom. "Phantom of Winnipeg will tell the story of that fan community and how it’s still going strong today. Like a concentrated and highly idiosyncratic Rocky Horror Picture Show, the film found in Winnipeg a devoted audience of, weirdly, 9 to 13-year-olds, who bought hundreds of tickets. Phantom actually outsold Jaws in its initial release, and local sales of the soundtrack helped the album go gold in Canada. The film also spawned 'Phantompalooza,' a local festival held biannually since 2004."

    What fandoms and parts of fan culture do you think should be remembered? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom in Motion

    By Claudia Rebaza on mardi, 8 December 2015 - 4:33pm
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    • MoviePilot.com looked at how the rapid appearance of Linkle fan art made a statement about her acceptance within the fandom. "When Linkle was first announced as a new character for the upcoming Hyrule Warriors: Legends game, the internet went crazy. Some loved her, some hated her. The debate is still going strong and will probably not end any time soon...and several people have already drawn their own version of Linkle. I have scavenged the internet and collected the best fan-art I could find for you to feast your eyes upon."
    • Yibada.com put a spotlight on a Dragon Ball Z fan film. "If you're looking for a darker and more realistic version of Dragon Ball Z then this fan-made live action flick is for you. A group of European fans produced the almost 30-minute 'Dragon Ball Z: The Fall of Men' and it will blow your mind." The film "features Trunks and is set in the future. It is inspired by the characters in the Dragon Ball saga. It also pays tribute to the iconic universe that Toriyama created."
    • A.V. Club wrote about a LEGO stop motion fan film. "Captain America finds himself in a town overrun by Nazi zombies and must fight his way through the horde, and soon finds himself entangled with other characters from the Marvel Cinematic Universe. It’s an exciting short that displays real talent in the stop-motion medium as Whaley uses lighting, music, and impressive poses for the characters to create an incredibly gory but fun short film that is as brutal as it is entertaining."
    • The Hockey Writers discussed a fan who had turned her very fannishness into a tradable product. Kat Velez no longer felt comfortable supporting her team, the Chicago Blackhawks. "So, Velez decided to sell her fandom to support the fight against domestic violence. A fan of any team from any hockey league can donate to have Velez root for their team. At the end of the week whoever donates the most money will get to choose the team Velez roots for the next week. Yes, even if you are a fan of the Australian Ice Hockey League...she will root for you, as long as she has access to a live stream of the game."

    What fanworks do you think should be remembered? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: No Place to Hide

    By thatwasjustadream on dimanche, 15 November 2015 - 5:23pm
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    • AdNews discussed the use of YouTube fandoms as a marketing bonanza. "The quality of talent on display, and the reaction of fans got the point across about the premium content YouTube has to offer...Stuart Bailey, chief digital officer at OMD Australia, believes that, 'long gone are the days when clients would associate YouTube with skateboarding cats and other such content. It now has content credential in spades. Google certainly flexed their ‘influencer’ muscles and showed that some of their YouTube talent are stars in their own right, with engaged and loyal audiences - some queuing from 6am to catch a peek of their favourite YouTube stars,' Bailey said. 'The trick will be how to tap into that talent to not only communicate with a brand’s customers and consumers but to add value and customised experiences.'"
    • Comic Book Bin asked whether fan films should be crowdsourced. "I believe that copyrights holders should be tolerant of fan films and fan fiction but to a limit. When fan fiction and fan film creators earn money from the unlicensed properties they exploit, that is a problem. More than voluntarily breaching the rights of copyrights owners, they earn revenues from properties they have no right to exploit. If you want to make a Batman film, do it on your own, bear all the costs. Use it as a portfolio piece. But to go out of your way to ask people to fund your Batman film is wrong. You don’t own Batman."
    • MTV.com spoke glowingly about erotic fanfiction competitions and noted it's an expanding business. "If you’re not in San Francisco or New York, you can still observe the NSFW madness from afar. Shipwreck also has a regular podcast where they post recordings of their live show, as well as a Tumblr where you can read previous works — and last night they just announced they’ll be publishing a book sometime next year."
    • QSR promoted a Dairy Queen competition for fans. "Along with a new television advertising campaign dedicated entirely to Fans, both the Random Acts of Fandom Giveaway and the ad campaign showcase a wide variety of DQ Fans professing love for their favorite people, places, and things including vintage cars and the perfect nature hideout."

    What efforts to tap the fandom market have you been seeing? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Costs and Benefits

    By Kirsten Korona on samedi, 14 November 2015 - 5:06pm
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    • Fan creators continue being confused about the legality of their work and clearly many don't know where to turn for answers. Luckily OTW's legal team keeps trying to get the word out. Two of our staffers appeared on the Fansplaining podcast and talked about "listener responses to the Wattpad episode, the purpose and projects of the Organization for Transformative Works, plagiarism vs. copyright infringement, and #FanworksAreFairUse." Legal Committee Chair Betsy Rosenblatt said, "[T]here’s a sort of personal autonomy element to fandom that I think is a really important thing to preserve. Maybe not the only important thing to preserve, but a thing that matters, and I think that’s part of what mattered to the [Organization for Transformative Works]." (No transcript available).
    • While copyright claims scale new heights of absurdity, TechDirt pointed out that other companies are reaching out to fandom. "When Rockstar released its own video editor for Grand Theft Auto 5, the move in and of itself received only mild applause. People have been using video games to make entirely transformative works for some time now. More important was the signal that Rockstar was sending: use our game to make fan films. This is smart for any number of reasons, but allowing fans to use games as they see fit makes those games more valuable to the market, and those transformative works ultimately only serve to advertise the original game in the first place."
    • Less often discussed in relation to fans' activities are how beneficial they can be. EdSurge hosted a post on the difficulty of getting kids engaged with schoolwork compared to how they excelled in their own hobbies and interests. "Finally, Annika is a video editor. She uploads twice a week to her Vocaloid Chorus channel. She started by wasting time watching anime. She began drawing manga, then started creating Vocaloid 'choruses' mashing up others’ work, and now creates her own Vocaloid 'covers' and participates in fan fiction. The adults in her life barely know what any of this is. Her learning environment is made up of online interest groups with individuals that challenge each other and share knowledge and skills. Too hard? Nope."
    • The Daily Dot took a look at the business end of things from a fan's point of view, detailing the expenses that go into being an anime fan. "Previously we’ve looked at the cost of YouTube fandom and what it would take financially to attend all the marquee events in the space for one year. With anime having a wider berth of events and a longer history, there’s a lot of ways to slice your fiscal fandom, but we decided to grab the biggest names in the community for our imaginary fan, to see how they stack up against the YouTubers."

    Do you have your own stories about what fanworks have done for you? Start a page in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Big Business Selfies

    By Janita Burgess on dimanche, 25 October 2015 - 4:32pm
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    • Here and Now did a segment on how important the Twilight film had become to the economy of the town it's set in. Focusing on the 10th anniversary celebration of Twilight's publication, the segment interviews citizens of Forks, Washington and discusses the events taking place. (No transcript available)
    • At Publishing Technology the economic impact of fanfiction is in focus. "[T]he way that fan fiction takes a piece of Intellectual Property and chops it up, plays with it and distributes it over multiple networks and media...is a very pure expression of the kind of creative approach to content exploitation that we at Publishing Technology have been talking to publishers about for a very long time. The possibilities opened up by digital media mean that the book is often only the beginning of the commercial life of a piece of IP. Yet it still remains the only focus of many publishers, who find it conceptually and practically difficult to unbundle the book and sell it as chapters, or a serial, or even a content marketing campaign paid for by a brand advertiser. The book is treated as the end-product of the publishing process, when it could be just the beginning."
    • Film School Rejects discussed how fandom documentaries are becoming a form of fandom selfie. "Other than that, Ghostheads doesn’t seem to have much of a reason to exist. Like too many other fandom docs, it’s not likely to reach or be appealing to the millions of non-extreme fans let alone total outsiders. It will tell a number of hardcore Ghostbusters fans things they already know about themselves and their beloved movie...I also wouldn’t be surprised if the studios start encouraging, maybe even secretly contributing to the crowdfunding of docs that in turn foster and support fans and enthusiasm for their upcoming slates. If nothing else, they might later on be cheap pickups to throw onto their Blu-ray releases of the original or new version of their respective properties."
    • Alaska Dispatch News mapped the growth of Senshi con "from [a school] cafeteria to UAA and in recent years mushrooming into an expansive convention housed in the Egan Center. Now celebrating its 10th anniversary, Bundick and other organizers are expecting more than 4,000 attendees, and Alaska Business Monthly is predicting it will produce an economic impact of $191,000" with the growth likely to continue. Its organizer said “We’re still getting [vendor and artist] applications for this year. This is the first time we’ve had a waiting list...Local people and businesses are wanting to get in on it."

    What sorts of economic and business growth have you seen tied to fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Effects

    By Kirsten Korona on mercredi, 19 August 2015 - 6:08pm
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    • Film School Rejects hosted an article discussing how fandom is affecting movie media sites. "The upsides to all of this are obvious if you’re the kind of fan who loves scoops, behind-the-scenes rumors, set photos, and every element of The Possible. The downsides are less obvious...The first is that conversations about older movies (including stuff from way, way back in 2014) are muted, and, in some cases, harder to find...The second is that we’re all asking to be lied to. In the past decade, movie news has devolved from done deals to rumors."
    • The L.A. Review of Books discussed the relevance of YA literature to media literacy. "Authors and filmmakers know that young people don’t just consume; they make stuff, too. So featuring characters who create content themselves is a key to attracting the attention of young readers and viewers" which should lead parents and teachers to "think about how such stories guide young people to think about their private use of multimedia. What messages do they send about such use, about how young people should be thinking about both media consumption and media making?" Professor Jonathan Alexander concludes, "If you’re a kid, keep an open mind about what you’re reading and watching. And think about making your own movies to share your ideas and keep the conversation going."
    • The Providence Journal in Rhode Island, U.S. discovered how widely media can spread when they ran a Lovecraft fanfic contest. "We received nearly 200 responses, including submissions from as far away as Brazil, Pakistan and New Zealand. In a frightening sign of Lovecraft’s international stature, we received submissions from more than a dozen foreign countries, including multiple entries from England (4), Italy (3), Australia (2) and Germany (4). Individual Lovecraft fans in France, Mexico, Scotland, India and Trinidad & Tobago also submitted stories. Closer to home, we received submissions from 27 states, three Canadian provinces and one U.S. commonwealth (Puerto Rico)."
    • Tech Insider discussed the spreading use of the term shipping. “'Kids often use the word when talking about [characters from] TV shows and movies, but it’s also become a slang term for describing any two people that you want to get together'...In a sense, some people were shipping over 100 years ago, according to Know Your Meme. They just weren't calling it that. In 1913, the book 'Old Friends, New Fancies' featured characters from Jane Austen’s 'Pride and Prejudice' re-imagined in new relationships.

    How have you seen fans changing language and media? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Guest Post: Donna Davies

    By Janita Burgess on lundi, 27 July 2015 - 4:27pm
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    From time to time, the OTW will be hosting guest posts on our OTW News accounts. These guests will be providing an outside perspective on the OTW or aspects of fandom where our projects may have a presence. The posts express each author's personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. We welcome suggestions from fans for future guest posts, which can be left as a comment here or by contacting us directly.

    Today's post is an interview with Donna Davies, the writer, director and producer behind the documentary Fanarchy. The documentary explores how new affordable technology is allowing fans to threaten the Hollywood system by producing the films they want to see in quantities Hollywood can't keep up with. It premiered July 9 on Epix Drive-in.

    What inspired you to make this documentary?

    I made a documentary about the Hollywood film industry that featured some pretty high profile directors and discovered that several had made their own homemade tributes to the stories and movies they loved when they were kids. I was intrigued by the fact that these individuals were all inspired by the TV shows, books and movies they loved as children and were really still fans at heart. I wanted to look deeper into the idea of fandom as artistic inspiration.

    What is your personal history with fandom?

    I'm a fan of the old Hammer horror films, like The Curse of the Werewolf, Horror of Dracula, etc. I'm also a huge fan of Dylan Thomas. Not really a fan of superhero movies, although I did love the Super Chicken and Underdog cartoon superheroes.

    What was the biggest revelation when you were making Fanarchy?

    I was amazed by how powerful fans have become. As a result on fans and their desire to be part of the world they love, the entertainment industry has completely changed. It's become less passive than in has been in the past. It's become more of a participatory sport.

    What has the reaction to Fanarchy been, and what surprised you about that?

    I had imagined the San Diego Comic-Con crowd would relate to the film, but I didn't expect to have so much interest from the those who aren't involved in the fan community. The idea of ownership of story and copyright is clearly more relevant now then ever before in history.

    How do the philosophies of the OTW (such as that fanworks are fair use, female spaces and representations should be encouraged) fit with what you found?

    Early on in the process of making the film, I interviewed [OTW Legal Staffer] Rebecca Tushnet. Rebecca provided insight into the legal implications from the fan's perspective. I also interviewed media expert Jeff Ulin, a lawyer who had worked for Disney and Lucasfilm, where he managed worldwide distribution including the franchise sales for Star Wars. These two experts gave me insight into of the vast divide that often exists between the fans and the copyright holders.

    I was worried at the start of making the film, because, although I had dealt with fair use in previous docs, I had never pushed things this far before. Although the fan films featured in the doc have been available on the Internet, until now they haven't been broadcast on traditional television. Here's hoping I don't end up in jail.

    In all seriousness, I think we're making huge progress in the area of fair use in documentary film. I can do things today that were not possible just 10 years ago.

    As for female spaces, while fan culture is absolutely rooted in female culture, I think that has primarily been the "story" side. The "film" production side has traditionally tended to bias towards males. However with accessible distribution methods and affordable technology that is changing.

    My film is really looking primarily at fan films and TV shows, not literature or vidding. I'm totally fascinated by that side though, so maybe that's my next film!

    The main character of Fanarchy is Maya Glick, a black woman from Texas who, through the making of my doc ends up achieving her goal of making her own fan-film tribute to [Marvel character] Storm. I also feature several other female characters, including Brea Grant who, after much success acting in Hollywood films and TV shows like Friday Night Lights, Heroes, and Dexter, went on to write her own comic book, then engaged with her fans to eventually make her own feature film.

    There's also Stephanie Thorpe, who, along with her producing partner Paula Rhodes, made a loving fan tribute to their favourite childhood comic book series, Elfquest, and then used that fan film to convince the copyright holders to give them the rights to make the Elfquest TV series.

    In addition to Rebecca Tushnet, the film features other female experts such as film critic Maitland McDonagh and journalist Heidi Honeycutt.

    What are your thoughts on the monetization of fanworks?

    This is a tricky area to navigate. Some fans just want to play with the stories and characters they love. I believe that these fans should be able to do so freely. And I think that this has become more and more acceptable.

    Copyright holders are beginning to understand that these fans are not harming their franchises. It's very difficult to prove that these homages take away money from the original works. However fans still have to be careful. They have to walk a very fine line between freedom to express their fandom and directly profiting monetarily from that fandom. The fans who want to use their fan works to build a fan base can easily do so. Doing a fan film about Batman enables the filmmaker of that fan film to reach out to other fans, and gain an audience for an original film that they can legally profit from.

    Things are evolving very quickly. Some fan films are becoming so professional it is impossible to tell them from the original. Fan filmmakers who are doing these super pro films are hoping that they can eventually make a deal with original copyright holders to share in any profits that could be made from the fan works.

    They are always going to be fans who just want to do this for themselves as a labour of love on the one hand and on the other hand those who want to use the fan work as a calling card to break into a career.

    Finally, how can fans who've missed the previous airings watch Fanarchy?

    The film will be broadcast on Epix Drive-in throughout the summer. It will be available on Netflix in October.

    We're also doing the film festival circuit now and broadcasting in Canada in the fall.

  • OTW Fannews: Securing a Place

    By Janita Burgess on mercredi, 10 June 2015 - 4:26pm
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    Banner by Sidhrat in black white and red with an image of a padlock and the text OTW Fannews Securing a Place

    • Rocket News 24 posted about a fan anime film launched after a year of work. "YouTube user azuresakuga is a non-Japanese otaku with a passion for animating. He’s spent the last year working on a short animation of his own, combining all of his favorite anime characters into one all-star marathon. Ever since he shared it with the world, Japanese otaku have been praising it all over, and once you see it too, you’ll probably do the same."
    • Bleeding Cool wrote about the Machinima Event in NYC. "Chief Revenue Officer, Jamie Weissenborn took the stage to talk about who the 'audience' is for Machinima, and described them as being ethnically diverse, 'slightly more male' and having a 'higher household median income' than many other networks. He shared that Machinima content has a 97% 'like' rating, and used the example of the Halo: Nightfall launch featuring a fan art contest which went into 'overdrive' in page impressions. Crossing DC Entertainment with Machinima, Geoff Johns was introduced by video to talk about The Hero Project from DC. This is a new competition that will bring contestants to 'secure a place' in the DC Universe with props, and visual effects provided for them to make their own shows, it seems. The goal is to produce a 'live-action short video based on their own interpretations of characters from DC Comics’ Starman comic book series'."
    • Disney's Star Wars site interviewed art teacher George Folz, the creator of 'Darth Days'. "I’d been drawing almost exclusively with a pen for a couple of years, and something about creating ink drawings of him with a fat brush was just pure bliss. As comics are my bag, and I was looking for a personal project outside of The Roman Nose, I got the idea that I’d recreate a Darth Vader scene from the original trilogy every day of 2015."
    • A post at Union and Blue speculated on Fandom: Why Do We Care About This Nonsense?. "Many of us grew up with sports, like a one sided long distance family member, who is always there but our interaction is minimal. And when we finally get that in person experience, it evolves like a vacation far more magical than anything we feel past our teenage years. We love, we love, we care, we root...But there’s always a buffer...It’s that safe distance of caring and admiration that makes sports the ultimate getaway. You can still engage, you can still care, but even at it’s darkest days, it doesn’t devastate you the way life can."

    What amazing fanwork have you seen recently? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Giving Some Credit

    By Pip Janssen on vendredi, 22 May 2015 - 3:18pm
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    Banner showing a cartoon figure holding a book that says I Wrote This!

    • A post at Polygon disagreed with fans' protests about game mods being sold on Steam. "Over and over, it’s been shown that when great content is rewarded with cash, better content flows forward. Of course, more crap will also flow in — but Steam has spent years improving its Workshop system to let the best content filter to the top. Modders will now have a reason to finish their work, and the best modders will find reward in the social aspects of the modding scene — as well as monetarily. The idea that adding a layer of real-world rewards will somehow stifle content is absurd."
    • Notwithstanding the lure of cash, game publisher Bethesda listened to fans and reversed its decision, even refunding earlier purchases. "[W]e underestimated the differences between our previously successful revenue sharing models, and the addition of paid mods to Skyrim's workshop. We understand our own game's communities pretty well, but stepping into an established, years old modding community in Skyrim was probably not the right place to start iterating. We think this made us miss the mark pretty badly, even though we believe there's a useful feature somewhere here...Even though we had the best intentions, the feedback has been clear - this is not a feature you want. Your support means everything to us, and we hear you."
    • Radio.com wrote about the contest run for Mad Men to reproduce its first episode. "Similar fan-made cuts of other movies have taken the internet by storm, including Star Wars Uncut, a project to remake the Star Wars films. That project began in 2009 as a lark by a then-20-something programmer and later went on to win an Emmy for Outstanding Creative Achievement in Interactive Media. Few of these types of crowd-sourced remakes, however, have gone on to be recognized in an official way or aired for millions on TV. This makes Mad Men: The Fan Cut a smart move on AMC’s part to rally Mad Men junkies as the show winds down, allowing them to re-enact favorite scenes and put their efforts back on the same screen that captured their imaginations seven seasons ago."
    • The Media Industries Project "examines the profound changes affecting media industries worldwide, focusing especially on creative labor, digital distribution, and globalization" and looks at what they call connected viewing, which they define as "any product or service that augments the entertainment experience by integrating Internet access, game play, and/or social networking." They look at various changes in entertainment consumption, including "How is connected viewing transforming the relationship of viewers to media content and access?" However, the MIP looks at the issue more in terms of how it challenges entertainment producers than in the relationship between audience and creators.
    • One area where the relationship between audience and creators continues to fail is in fanwork ambushes. Nerd Reactor posted about the latest display of fan art on a TV talk show. While acknowledging that "[s]ome fans have commented on the trend with criticism, saying that it is a way of shaming fans and making celebrities uncomfortable" the title of the article points out the real issue involved -- the lack of participation by fans. If the creator of the fanwork isn't known, it's probably because the media outlet in question failed to make any effort to contact them for permission, as well as failed to credit them on air.

    What sort of creator and fan interactions have been a win or fail in your experience? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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