Glossary

Academic journal

''An academic journal publishes scholarly, peer-reviewed articles written by experts. The function of a journal is to distribute knowledge, not to make money for the publishers.'' From Academic Journals: What Are They? (http://jerz.setonhill.edu/writing/academic/sources/journals/index.html)

Board of Directors

A group of persons who govern the organization. For more details about the OTW board and how it is organized, see the Organization for Transformative Works section of our FAQ.

Creative Commons

''is a non-profit organization devoted to expanding the range of creative works available for others to build upon legally and to share'' (from the Wikipedia Creative Commons article here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creative_Commons). The Creative Commons website is here: http://creativecommons.org.

EFF

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (http://www.eff.org) is a US-based nonprofit organization created in 1990 to educate internet users about their First Amendment rights, and to assist with cyber-law creation and interpretation.

Fair Dealing

Many countries, such as the UK and Canada, use ''fair dealing'' as an analogue to the US concept of ''fair use.'' Wikipedia offers an overview of fair dealing in the UK, and the differences between it and fair use (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyright_law_of_the_United_Kingdom).

Fair Use

Under US (and now Israeli) copyright law, fair use limits copyright owners' rights under certain circumstances. Chillingeffects.org has a good overview (http://www.chillingeffects.org/fairuse).

Fan

The OTW will not attempt to define a fan or fandom; if you consider yourself a fan, then the OTW considers you a fan.

Fandom

The OTW will not attempt to define a fan or fandom; if you consider yourself part of a fandom, then the OTW considers you part of a fandom.

Fanwork

The creative work done by fans for fannish purposes.

Gold Open Access

An ''open access'' journal (as opposed to Green Open Access, which is self-archiving in a repository). See Creative Commons' definition (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), and the entry Open Access Journal in Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_access_journal).

Media fandom

''Media fandom is generally used to refer to fictional, Western fandoms based on movies or television'' (from http://fanlore.org/wiki/Media_fandom). Books, comics, video games, anime/manga, and real people fandoms often intersect with, but also exist in parallel to, media fandom.

Nonprofit

Unlike a for-profit corporation, a nonprofit must not operate for private benefit. Any monies it raises must go to carrying out its aims as stated in its charter.

Open Source

The Open Source Initiative (http://www.opensource.org) describes itself as ''a development method for software that harnesses the power of distributed peer review and transparency of process.'' Open source software is software for which human-readable source code is generally available, allowing other people to use, change, and improve the code without requiring permission from the original creators.

Remix culture

Remix culture is a neologism that describes a culture of creativity based on previous creations. This is in contrast with permission culture, which aims to bind derivative creativity to the permission of the license holders. Both terms are simplified abstractions for current political and legal positions. (adapted from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remix_culture)

Tax-exempt

In the United States, there are many kinds of tax-exempt organizations (http://www.muridae.com/nporegulation/documents/exempt_orgs.html). The OTW holds 501(c)(3) status (http://www.irs.gov/charities/charitable/article/0,,id=96099,00.html), which covers most charities.

Test suite

A ''test suite [...] is a collection of test cases that are intended to be used to test a software program to show that it has some specified set of behaviours'' (from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Test_suite). Our test suite of vids is designed to highlight various transformative features of vids.

Transformative

Transformative works are creative works about characters or settings created by fans of the original work, rather than by the original creators. Transformative works include but are not limited to fanfiction, real person fiction, fan vids, and graphics. A transformative use is one that, in the words of the U.S. Supreme Court, ''adds something new, with a further purpose or different character, altering the [source] with new expression, meaning, or message.'' A story from Voldemort's perspective is transformative, so is a story about a pop star that illustrates something about current attitudes toward celebrity or sexuality.

Wiki

A ''collection of web pages designed to enable anyone who accesses it to contribute or modify content.'' (from Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiki). More information about the OTW's Fanlore wiki can be found under the Our Projects link at the top of the page.