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  • OTW Fannews: Fangirls in the Wild

    By Claudia Rebaza on Martedì, 28 July 2015 - 4:00pm
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    Banner by Alice of the top of a face peering out from behind some leaves

    • San Diego Comic Con (SDCC) season means it's time for the media to once again declare that fangirls exist. The New York Times thought this was the year for fangirls. "A bunch of oddballs — nerds and fanboys, toy collectors and cosplayers, gamers and fantasists — invaded the mainstream and planted themselves at the vital center of the entertainment industry...Lately, though, something else has been happening, too — a shift in the ecosystem of fandom symbolized not only by Sadness but also by another new addition to the Comic-Con costume repertory: Imperator Furiosa, the crew-cut, one-armed avenger played by Charlize Theron in 'Mad Max: Fury Road.' Furiosa’s presence amid the Disney princesses and Manga pixies is an especially potent sign of the feminism that is a big part of this event."
    • A more thoughtful article at Refinery29 points out that SDCC is hardly a bastion of feminism yet. "What we’re calling fangirls here covers an admittedly wide and amorphous group of women. They’re cosplayers, comic book collectors, sci-fi nerds, steampunk enthusiasts, booth babes, Lolitas, and more....And they are vocal: When the proportion of female writers and artists for DC Comics plunged from 12 percent to 1 percent in 2011, female fans started a petition for DC to hire more women. DC Comics responded by promising to try. Female fans from a group called the Carol Corps. were also instrumental last year in pushing Marvel to announce plans for a movie about Captain Marvel, a super-powered woman. In other words, fangirls are engaged and numerous, making up a significant portion of the audience that shells out hard-earned dollars to support their pop culture passions. And yet, despite that, this group remains the third estate of the comics / fantasy world."
    • The Chicago Tribune focused more on numbers. "'But when you start to break it down according to how fans identify themselves, we find that no individual fandom is that even,' continues Salkowitz, who will discuss his findings Sunday afternoon at Comic-Con. 'Comics, videogaming, hobby gaming and toy collecting are majority male, usually in the 55- to 60-percent range. Manga/anime, science fiction/fantasy and media fandom are 60- to 65-percent female. Because today's big conventions appeal to fans of everything, audiences coming to shows are pretty much gender-balanced. However, it's still the case that, say, 'comics' fandom tends more toward older guys, whereas manga appeals more to younger women.'"
    • As Neon Tommy pointed out, having female creators representing female fans in the media is a needed step forward. "As for today’s devoted fangirls — who have often been excluded from the full participatory side of media — Jarett says the 'Fan Girl' film's message is one of female empowerment. 'Telulah is a filmmaker,' he says. 'And being a fan of something can also be someone’s art — it’s a form of creative expression.'"

    How many times have you been discovered within fandom? Write about your history in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Who's Fandoming Now?

    By Ellorgast on Martedì, 23 June 2015 - 4:29pm
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    Several people are silhouetted against a sky fading after sunset, posing as though dancing.  Text in front of them reads 'OTW Fannews: Who's Fandoming Now?'

    • South Africa's Daily Maverick provided an overview of fandom with some definitions. "You cannot be a part of fandom if you love something but do not interact with fellow fans. Fandom is less a kingdom of fanatics and more a kinship of one...Imagine this happening; a group of fans sit down, someone says I really thought x should have been y and almost everyone agrees on the fact. Not that big a deal, right? Now imagine that they do that same thing on the internet. Suddenly the scope of people who are meaningfully discussing and often reach consensus numbers in the thousands, tens of thousands, sometimes much more than that. That alone is a powerful thing; hard for the original creator of a book or TV show to ignore, but it is not the only powerful thing about fandom."
    • As each year passes, it seems most people take part in fandom in some way, however unlikely. It's also increasingly seen as a professional outlet. ABS CBN News featured live erotica readings in the Philippines that included fanfic creations, though these at least were created by the performers. " The writers dream up their concoctions in various formats: monologues, radio plays, fan fiction, interactive games. They draw inspiration from everywhere: history, art, science, comic books, movies. Once a draft is ready, it’s submitted to a core group of writers who conduct an informal workshop, offering comments and and revision, until there’s a general consensus that the work is ready."
    • The Daily Beast focused on print erotica, interviewing a writer selling U.S. president fanfic on Amazon. "'I wanted to write something that had never been done, but then I thought, ‘Oh, this is a really interesting idea,’' he said, before adding that in fact, presidential erotica has sort of been done. 'There was some [erotica] that involved sex with four presidents, but they were all consecutive. No one had sex with William Howard Taft (1909-1913) but also Richard Nixon." No mention was made of Historical RPF fanworks.
    • As a conversation between Neil Gaiman and Kazuo Ishiguro at The New Statesman pointed out, commercializing fanwork is hardly new. "I love the fact that, you know, in the early versions of King Lear, the story had a happy ending. Shakespeare turned it into a tragedy, and through the 18th and 19th centuries they kept trying to give it a happy ending again. But people kept going back to the one that Shakespeare created. You could definitely view Shakespeare as fan fiction, in his own way. I’ve only ever written, as far as I know, one book that did the thing that happens when people online get hold of it and start writing their own fiction, which was Good Omens, which I did with Terry Pratchett. It’s a 100,000-word book; there’s probably a million words of fiction out there by now, written by people who were inspired by characters in the book." (Gaiman is mistaken about the limits of his success, though).

    Make sure your own favorite fanworks don't get forgotten: write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Fannews: It's the Little Things

    By Ellorgast on Lunedì, 8 June 2015 - 5:18pm
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    OTW Fannews: It's the Little Things

    • At Huffington Post, The Flash actress Candice Patton was happy to hear about fanfic about her character. "There's Iris fan fiction? That's news to me. I try to stay off the parts of the internet which pertain to me or my character to a large degree. But, I think fan fiction is a great way for people to express themselves and storylines they want to see. I think it's a wonderful creative outlet! I believe I wrote / read some fan fiction when I was a teenager. It was fun!"
    • Smart Bitches, Trashy Books ran a feature on The Romance Reader’s Guide to the Marvel Cinematic Universe which did not overlook fanfic. "If you like erotica and/or m/m: Fanfic. Oh God. SO MUCH FANFIC. We can safely guarantee that wherever your desires lie, there is fanfic about it. Some fan fic is totally non-erotic in nature – here’s a link to my fav purely SFW piece, “Steve and Natasha Go to Ikea”. Some of it is torrid beyond belief. A lot of it is m/m, so until we get a gay MCU universe character, Science Bros (among others), will have to tide you over if m/m is your thing."
    • At Collider, Anna Kendrick discussed the femslash aspects of Pitch Perfect and also her disappointment that not all of it is torrid beyond belief. "I’m not gonna lie to you, I tried to read one fanfiction because I was like, ‘I have to know’ and I was… maybe I chose the wrong fanfiction to read, but it was so slow. I was expecting it to be like, ‘Oh my God! I can’t believe they’re writing this crazy shit about me and Brittany [Snow]’ but there was a lot of exposition and I was like, ‘This isn’t a [Charles] Dickens novel’ so I gave up on it after that."
    • The Roanoke Times' introduction to its new crime reporter demonstrated that even professional bios might discuss fanfic. "Interesting fact about you that few know: I used to write fan fiction – mostly Teen Titans and X-men related novellas. I recently made the (probably unwise) decision to return to fan fiction, this time spurred by the Faustian anime series Puella Magi Madoka Magica."

    Where are all the places you're seeing discussion about fanfic taking place? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Product Placement

    By .Lindsey D on Domenica, 5 April 2015 - 5:34pm
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    • Vulture released a series of articles on fanfiction, including an attempt to unravel "My Immortal", and a look at some published authors discussing fanfiction activities. "[T]he undeniable signature of a writer’s fic orientation isn’t eroticism but confession, the frank and extended discussion of emotions. If porn offers men the vision of women whose carnality is neither elusive nor mysterious, fic offers its mostly women readers men whose inner lives are wide-open books — not so easy to find in popular culture. Whether these imaginary Spocks or Justin Biebers are straight or gay, theirs is a love that not only dares to speak its name but will happily go on talking about itself for thousands of words at a time."
    • While fanfic has gone on for not just thousands of words but thousands of years, there are constant claims about what was its first example. A recent one was made by the president of the local chapter of the Jane Austen Society of North America. "Thompson has written extensively about Jane Austen fandom, and she has an article coming out in the United Kingdom: “Crafting Jane: Handmade homages and their makers.” Even Jane Austen fandom was ahead of its time. The ultimate contemporary fan tribute is to write your own stories, set in the world of your favorite author-filmmaker. 'I'll be talking about the first translation of ‘Sense and Sensibility' into French from 1817...The writer didn't like the end of the book, so she rewrote it. It represents the first fan fiction.'"
    • ABC Newcastle, Australia sought to find the origins of fandom. "When people can be so unwavering and loyal to their fanaticisms, what are the ethical boundaries around organisations not exploiting their product's fans? Melanie James believes fans can be viewed in different ways. 'Fandom is cultivated by organisations. Football clubs want their fans; movie franchises want their fans...A marketer would look at a fan quite differently [to someone else]. [Marketers could think], 'There is a potential person for me to make a lot of money out of, because they're going to buy the t-shirt, the video, the game, the costume and go to the movies.' They're a commodity.'"
    • Wattpad certainly seems to think so. A story in It Business, Canada reported on a marketing to millennials talk that revealed that product placement is something the company is attempting to use with its writers. For example they have fit "existing stories to brands, with ads for Taylor Swift’s new album performing well inside pieces of fan fiction featuring Taylor Swift. Brands have also written their own stories for Wattpad readers, with writers of the new USA Network TV series Dig writing stories for the platform. Brands have also created a whole campaign around a Wattpad story. The company has a very large following in the Philippines, and Unilever wanted to reach it to promote its Eskinol pimple cream. They commissioned a Wattpad writer to write a story about someone getting a pimple just before a date." Their strategy is to obscure the marketing aspect as much as possible. "When we failed, it obviously looked and felt like an ad."

    How have you seen fanworks being co-opted for marketing use? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Getting Along

    By Janita Burgess on Martedì, 19 August 2014 - 4:50pm
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    OTW Fannews Getting Along

    • TIME's James Poniewozik examined why different media fandoms need to play nice. "Outlander the TV series is an adaptation, which Starz–like HBO or AMC or any other adapter–is making for an audience that, ideally, will be far larger than the readership alone. Can you not have a legitimate opinion on them unless you have read the source books–and unless you love the source books and are invested in a series you haven’t yet seen? Are the old fans the true fans, the authentic fans, the authoritative fans? Can you truly appreciate and understand an adaption without reading the source–or is it actually a handicap?"
    • Upworthy pointed to a video which mocked the 'fake geek girl' syndrome by deconstructing the arguments surrounding it. [No transcript available]
    • Adelaide's The Advertiser explored women's problems in comics fandom while also featuring a variety of cosplay pics which provided a good look at the variety of female characters on display. "'We need to realise that every fan has an equal right to be a fan, no matter how much or how little they’ve seen or read.' Ms Scott is confident the enlightenment of male fans is imminent. 'I feel like I’m seeing it already...as more and more girls come through, there’s a greater sense of things being inclusive and celebratory, more light and fun and exciting...Recently I saw someone cosplaying as a Snow White-themed Boba Fett from Star Wars — and when you have a fandom doing that, it’s amazing.' Ms Adams says angry male fans have missed the point. 'Fandom is for everyone, young or old, male or female, and the attitude toward it needs to change.'"
    • The New Statesman asked if 2014 was the year of the fan. "A few months back, I saw a post on Fyeahcopyright, a tumblr about fanworks and legal issues written and edited by lawyers Heidi Tandy and Hannah Lowe...[which] posited that all of this increased attention of and respect for fans could signal 'The Year of the Fan'...A quick google search revealed that there have been a few somewhat feeble-seeming attempts at years of fans in the past – a season-long promotion for an American baseball team, or a series of South Park full of winking in-jokes – but this is more about a collective feeling, some positive momentum, something that’s been gathering steam at an exponential rate recently."

    What do you feel needs celebrating in fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: What fanfic does for writers

    By Claudia Rebaza on Lunedì, 10 February 2014 - 5:00pm
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    Banner by Bremo of a Slaughterhouse Five book cover with falling bombs

    • Two articles examined the value of Amazon's Kindle Worlds. Slate featured author Hugh Howey. "I had read Slaughterhouse-Five in high school and didn’t really get it. And then a few years ago, I studied the work again, and the story had not just meaning but special meaning...Vonnegut’s didactic work helped me through a similar trauma. With my first work of fan fiction, I chose to use his example of writing about the bombing of Dresden in order to confront my 9/11 experiences—an event I’ve long avoided discussing directly. And what I discovered surprised me. Fan fiction is difficult. More difficult than the dozen or so novels I’d previously written."
    • Over at MainStreet, Craig Donofrio questioned what Kindle Worlds does for authors. "Another Kindle Worlds author, C.L. Marlene, began writing Vampire Diaries fan fiction for Kindle Worlds last June. It was her first venture into any kind of publishing, and she has written two novels, a novella and a short story since then. While sales have only allowed her 'a few extra nice dates' with her husband and gave her 'a minute bump or two' for her savings account, her overall experience with Worlds has been positive and she would recommend it to other authors—with the caveat to stay realistic. 'I'm not expecting this to pay my bills or launch me into a best-selling author list.'"
    • Certainly one way of getting paid for fanfic is writing a fanfic article, as Cora Frazier did at The New Yorker with her Scandal fanfiction where "Olivia Pope Fixes Chris Christie."
    • The Charleston, South Carolina Post & Courier included fan fiction in the bio of the youngest college student in their area. "Amber went on to skip third, fifth and seventh grades. Fourth-grade was her last full year in a traditional school setting, and after that year, Amber was helping high school students with algebra concepts." Her writing skills were quickly noted. "Rachel Walker, an associate professor of psychology, taught Amber in a writing and psychology class last semester, and she said Amber was 'exceptional.' The class was meant to teach students scientific writing, and Amber grasped concepts that many students find to be challenging, Walker said."

    What has fanfiction done for you? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanworks going public

    By Claudia Rebaza on Venerdì, 10 January 2014 - 9:26pm
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    Banner by Diane of a flasher opening a tan raincoat

    • Over the last ten years as fanworks have spread to more and more online sites, it's become a daily occurrence to find a media story pointing to one or more of them. Often these stories profess a sense of astonishment that they exist but don't do any research or provide any useful information. More recently, an even less informative but more unpleasant stunt has become common, as interviewers use fanworks to provoke a celebrity reaction. The fanwork creators are generally no more pleased at the outcome than the celebrities.
    • While such incidents have occurred repeatedly in connection to various fandoms, one has finally brought the fan point-of-view into the media coverage. As reported in various outlets, at a special screening for Sherlock fans its panel moderator insisted on the lead actors reading excerpts from a NSFW fanfic. What was different were the number of writers focusing on fans' reactions. "There has been an outpouring of support for ‘mildredandbobbin’ from Tumblr Sherlockians, with one slash fiction writer even outing herself and declared that she was proud of what she wrote. Another supporter has written an open letter, attacking Moran and saying that she has helped perpetuate a misogynistic misrepresentation of the fangirls."
    • Chris Meadows at Teleread prompted a discussion about the issue. "So, both Cumberbatch and Freeman seem to be more or less cool with the whole slash fan art thing. Yet various personalities seem to think it’s funny to confront them with this stuff over and over, as if this time they’ll manage to get a rise out of them."
    • Author Angela Highland expressed concern at the message being sent by such incidents. "I’m a fan of not pointing and laughing at people. There’s way too much of that in the world. And not enough encouragement of people to make some goddamn art."
    • Zap2It recounted the incident with many excerpts of the fic, but concluded "There may be two important lessons here: 1) Fan fiction has its place and this was not it. 2) Never mess with a fandom. They do not appreciate those who mock."
    • Queerty called the stunt a disaster. "According to audience reports, as is often the case when mainstream tastes detect even a hint of kink, Moran presented the fanfic as mocking and silly and campy and lame. Because gosh, how stupid of people to be passionate about something."
    • The Telegraph went beyond the incident to mention fanfiction traditions and explain what went wrong. "Some of the people writing fanfic - including the author of the piece Moran supplied to Cumberbatch and Freeman - are grown women and mums finding an enjoyable and productive outlet for having fun. They don't want to see the fourth wall broken any more than the actors want to do it."
    • Blogger Sarah Siegel took a contrary view, in part because of the lack of visible reaction to previous events. "And nobody’s ever really made a fuss about it. The author or artist chose to share their work publicly, and at worst it makes for an uncomfortable interview — which is the interviewer’s prerogative. The one caveat I’d add is that there is a difference between a TV interview intended to promote a project which will be screened to thousands (or millions) of people, and a very intimate Q&A intended for a small audience of die-hard fans. So if Moran made one gaffe, it was in not really understanding her audience." If so, then presumably the next time such an incident occurs, no one will be able to suggest that it's never mattered to anyone.

    What fanwork ambushes have you seen happening? Write about them Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Criticizing Fandom

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sabato, 26 October 2013 - 5:52pm
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    Banner by caitie of 3 figures at a table holding up cards with scores on them.

    • Entertainment Weekly kicked off a new pop-culture-related column with a look at TV show finales and cited former OTW board member Francesca Coppa. "Mentally, it is difficult to imagine someone from the 50s declaring themselves a 'fan' of a TV show the way someone self-identifies as a 'Fan' of Walking Dead or Vampire Diaries or Firefly or, hell, NCIS: LA. This is partly because we inaccurately agree that TV wasn’t as good in the ’50s and partly because we assume people in the ’50s had better things to do...But modern fandom has roots in that time period. Francesca Coppa’s fascinating essay 'A Brief History of Media Fandom' (available in the Fan Fiction and Fan Communities in the Age of the Internet) traces our contemporary idea of media fandom — fan clubs, fanfiction, fan conventions — to a pair of TV shows from the 1960s: Star Trek and The Man from U.N.C.L.E."
    • As a possible example of the fan complaints cited in the EW piece, Hypable jumped on the criticism by Once Upon a Time fandom about poor marketing efforts by its network. "ABC has had to pull back the Once Upon a Time season 3 cast photos due to unexpected fandom backlash. Once Upon a Time fans love their show and its characters, and have reportedly responded so negatively to the season 3 cast photoset that ABC has pulled the photographs from their press site."
    • The EW piece was not flattering to fandom, but writing in Flavor Wire Jason Diamond dismisses Jillian Cantor’s Margot as fanfiction, as if that were equivalent with poor taste. "Shalom Auslander, in 2012′s Hope: A Tragedy, wrote a book that I consider in even poorer taste, placing a still-alive Anne Frank in the modern-day attic of somebody’s house, trying to squeeze humor from this Philip Rothian plot device. Like Cantor, and unlike Mangum’s album or Quentin Tarantino’s fictional Jewish revenge film Inglourious Basterds, his book upset me because it trivialized, rather than made moving art in tribute to, the real lives of Holocaust victims."
    • Perhaps this negativity explains why, in this ABC piece Cafe Tacvba Fans Downplay Their Fandom, though the reporter concludes otherwise. "Eager to collect fandom statements on what makes a Cafeta fan a real, super, ultimate fan, I flew into New York City from Miami to attend its Monday night concert. Being a fan for the past 15 years and this probably being my 25th time going to a Cafe Tacvba show, I thought I was a super fan. But after talking to folks, I wonder if I'm committed enough to call myself one. There, I was not able to find anyone who would even self-identify as a "super fan"...Turns out Cafe Tacvba fans are so devoted to them, they believe they are not worthy of their fandom. They downplay their devotion, because proclaiming they are Cafe Tacvba super fans would entail great responsibility."

    What fandom criticisms have you seen? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Not so surprising sports fandoms

    By Claudia Rebaza on Mercoledì, 23 October 2013 - 6:10pm
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    Banner by Lisa of a green field with huddled soccer players & a team scarf being raised in the stands

    • Although they're among the most visible fandoms in many cultures, sports fandoms are also often gendered in the media. Forbes took note of better-late-than-never marketing to women, while Yahoo's Breakout blog listed five "surprising" stats about fantasy sports leading with the fact that players are both younger and more female than generally portrayed.
    • At Sports on Earth writer Colin McGowan wrote about learning to be a soccer fan. "In Alex Pappademas' 'I Suck at Football' column that ran last season at Grantland, he wrote about how his daughter understood the sport as 'the show where the men try to get the ball and then they fall down,' which is about as apt a description of football as you're going to find...It's not much more complicated than that, though it's as rich as any other sport. Being a fan isn't so much about understanding how the game works as much as it's telling yourself stories about the machinery. We assign meaning to teams and players, favor some styles over others, delight in or are crushed by swings of luck. The men kick the ball toward the goal and then fall down, and we have a lot to say about that."
    • Writing about baseball, Richard Peterson speculates how being a fan of specific teams shapes a fan's personality. "I could tell what team they rooted for by observing their demeanor. The Cubs fans in the audience were easy to pick out because they were the ones who looked like they needed a hug. It was also easy to find the Cardinals fans because they were the ones sitting next to Cubs fans. They weren’t about to hug the fans of Chicago’s lovable losers, but they did want to make sure that Cubs fans knew what the fans of a winning team looked like."
    • The Philadelphia CityPaper decided to investigate fanfiction about its hometown Flyers. "There are hundreds of stories and millions of words dedicated to imagined romances and trysts with the Flyers available for your perusal on Mibba, a creative-writing website boasting well over 10,000 stories." Yet even within this slice of fandom, writer Dan McQuade seemed to find it surprising that women were involved: "Most authors of Flyers fanfic identify themselves as young women, and this may be the one place on the Internet where this is actually true." He also might want to wander beyond Mibba before claiming that "this phenomenon doesn’t happen for baseball, basketball or football."

    What sports fandom stories do you have to tell? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Documenting Fandom

    By Julia Allis on Sabato, 28 September 2013 - 6:58pm
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    Banner displaying folder files edge-on.  Image text reads: OTW Fannews: Documenting fandom

    • The Hollywood Reporter wrote about Japan smashing the tweets per second world record. The reason? The word "balus" was tweeted "during a television broadcast of Hayao Miyazaki's anime classic Castle in the Sky (Tenku no Shiro Rapyuta)."
    • Retired English teacher Bill Kraft published a book about his 13-year campaign to honor Star Trek on a U.S. postage stamp. "The 72-year-old became a Trekkie in 1979 as he watched the last 10 minutes of 'Trek: The Motion Picture,' which ended with the creation — instead of the destruction — of a new life form..." His book contains "more than 140 letters endorsing the idea, including supporting words from Ray Bradbury, Isaac Asimov, NASA, Arthur C. Clarke and then- U.S. Sen. John Kerry. 'I had these beautiful, eloquent letters in my crawlspace for 15, 20 years, and I thought, "What a terrible shame. This should be part of the public record in some way,"' Kraft said."
    • The Central Florida Future wrote about in-person fandom clubs on college campuses. The Harry Potter club, "[I]n addition to visiting Universal Orlando’s Wizarding World of Harry Potter, the group would love to attend LeakyCon, a Harry Potter convention that is coming to Orlando in 2014. Already boasting a group of about 90, the club expects a spike in enrollment following the opening of Diagon Alley at Universal Orlando." Also mentioning the Doctor Who and My Little Pony groups, the article concludes that college life "might just be the perfect place to cultivate friendships and a fandom."
    • Meanwhile professors are studying fandom at Dragon Con. "Dunn and Herrmann's quantitative survey will look mostly at cosplay but will also encompass fandom in general and what specifically draws these people to Dragon Con." Students of cosplay courses might also be a good group to talk with. "ETSU offers a unique thespian course over the summer semester that teaches cosplay with a focus on 'acting for the convention goer.'"

    What fandom documentation have you seen in the mass media? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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