Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality

  • OTW Fannews: On fanfiction

    By Janita Burgess on Giovedì, 24 July 2014 - 4:55pm
    Message type:

    OTW Fannews: On Fanfiction Banner

    • Blogger Christopher Olah took a look at some Fanfiction.net statistics. "In the following post, we will visualize the Harry Potter, Naruto and Twilight fandoms on fanfiction.net. We will also use Google’s PageRank algorithm to rank stories, and perform collaborative filtering to make story recommendations to top fanfiction.net users." The post includes a look at languages, ships, slash and more.
    • ParentDish advised parents about fanfic reading and writing. "On the plus side, I am thrilled my daughter, who has never been a fan of books, is suddenly carrying stories with her everywhere - she can even read them on her iPhone - and has an insatiable thirst for words she never had before. She has even let me read a few chapters myself (with the caveat: 'Don't worry, Mum, this isn't actually based on anything I've done... yet') and she is a gifted story teller. And as Wattpad.com has over 1000 story downloads per day and with a whopping 25 million users, she is far from alone."
    • NY Mag decided to look for how fanficcers were responding to the World Cup. "Does all of this have you so intrigued? Yes? Well, brace yourself for another enthusiastic subset of World Cup erotica: the One Direction fan-fic crossover. Here’s a book that imagines two of the band members as rival soccer players at FIFA 2014 as well as lovers in bed. Here’s a shorter one about an abandoned blow job. And fear not — no matter where you turn for your World Cup smut — there will always be ball jokes."
    • Women of China took a broader look at slash in China. "With the rise of Sina Weibo and Wechat, two major instant messaging platforms in China, tanbi is no longer the cult genre it was a decade ago. There has been a growing number of girls, or fojoshi (a Japanese term for girls who endorse male homosexual love), who have started to write fan fiction that moves tanbi into the world of mainstream literature. A recent work pairs two X-men, Magneto and Professor X, powerful opponents who care about each other, at least in the Hollywood megahit X-Men: Days of Future Past. 'There are so many fojoshi that it's almost a selling point now,' Yang, the researcher says."

    Does your favorite fanfiction have a page on Fanlore? If not, start one! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Investigating Fandom

    By Janita Burgess on Mercoledì, 16 July 2014 - 4:48pm
    Message type:

    Describe the image in this space for the visually impaired

    • At Research Hazel Robinson discussed how fandom works. "Everyone behaves slightly differently online. So in the same way that a blogger might be more confessional on the internet than they would be in their office, fans will be sillier, more obscene in the privacy of a secluded online spot. The specific behaviours of fans will vary a lot from medium to medium though. Some fans might be quite coy on Twitter, as that’s often used for more cross-fandom/experience discussion and feels more public, whereas they’d be very open and in-depth about their fandom on a specific message-board or community."
    • The New Republic posted about fandom ethics in relation to the World Cup. "Objecting citizens may be overlooking the fact that students all over the world are learning about Brazilian arts, letters, and philosophy due to the attention brought upon the country by the World Cup. For example, this past semester, a student in my course on Latin American thought at Brooklyn College argued that the World Cup in fact represented a serious threat to democracy, given the authoritarian policies installed to organize and realize the Cup. He cited Leonardo Boff, a Brazilian theologian and philosopher, as a source for his concept of a just, participatory democracy...trying to track down all the consequences of buying a ticket from FIFA, coming to Brazil, and participating in the business surrounding the World Cup is impossible and does not get to the heart of the matter."
    • GMA News Online posted about KPop fans and stans. "'Fandom is a fuel of trade,' said Catherine Deen, one of three scholars who spoke about the hallyu phenomenon in the forum 'The Hallyu Mosaic in the Philippines: Framing Perception and Praxis' at the Ateneo Initiative for Korean Studies Conference...last week. In their studies, Deen and fellow speakers Patrick Capili and Gilbert Que surveyed hundreds of fans and major KPop fanclubs in the Philippines, categorizing the fans based on their activities and level of affinity with their idols."
    • The Ogiue Maniax blog discussed American anime fandom. "Historically, anime has not needed its American fanbase. Sure, there have been a lot of viewers, but anime’s domestic market is Japan, and it also finds success around the world, in Europe, South America, and Asia. The US certainly has an online presence when it comes to anime discussion and enthusiasm, but over the years it’s been easy to get the impression that this fandom is a paper tiger, especially when it comes to popular shows among the internet fandom not translating to home video sales...Now, however, not only are American viewers tuning in to catch Toonami and its latest anime, but the shows people are most interested in are also the ones that have developed large fanbases online as well."

    What parts of fandom history do you remember? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: To fan or not to fan

    By Kiri Van Santen on Giovedì, 3 July 2014 - 4:48pm
    Message type:

    • An L.A. Weekly article on why musician John Roderick couldn't be a fan brought about a number of responses. "[T]here was a turning point somewhere at the end of grade school where kids started lining up behind brands. I mean, I read Mad magazine, but I wouldn't have called myself a fan; the whole point of Mad was that they were ripping you off and laughing at you. The British invasion bands kinda smirked at their fans, too. My fandom pretty much stopped at the door. I owned the records, what else was I supposed to do?...Maybe that's what I dislike about fandom: commitment. I never wanted to be so tied to a band that I couldn't pull back."
    • Writer Jessica Khoury wrote at NPR about what Harry Potter brought to her life. "Did I lose some friends? I did. I remember telling some that I'd read the books and even liked them, and in shock they'd declared our friendship over, that we'd never speak again. And it was true, we never did — but to my surprise, I found myself relieved. I never once missed them. I heard others whispering Did you hear that Jessica read Harry Potter? and I smiled. Years later, I would sit in a theater with some of those same friends — and even my parents — for the opening night screening of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Years later, I'd find myself holding a butterbeer and crying in the middle of Hogsmeade at the Wizarding World of Harry Potter, because here was where it all began. Here was the beginning of my autonomy."
    • The Austin Chronicle claimed that the ATX Television Festival "caters to – and initiates – a new kind of fandom", saying it's "hitting its stride with audiences who increasingly view, review, and talk about TV the way they view, review, and talk about film. Around 1,200 of what co-founders Emily Gipson and Caitlin McFarland alternately call 'quality television viewers' and 'DVD extra fans' are...the viewers for whom ATXTVF was created. 'They're fans, but they're interested in the industry,' says McFar­land. 'Showrunners and creators are their rock stars.'"
    • Arizona State University's news service profiled a faculty member who wrote about football fandom in Africa. "'It was very clear that people felt the vuvuzela was a fundamental threat to a specific Eurocentric version of football,' Kassing added. 'And therefore it was not seen, at least by most people commenting, as a legitimate or alternative fan tradition.' Those posting in defense of the vuvuzela used humor and irony to make their points. Comments included, 'Who let all the locals in, honking their strange instruments, dancing around and having a good time. Football should be watched in silence,' along with, 'The incessant droning noise completely destroys the pleasure of watching the sport on TV. Please ban Formula 1 immediately'."

    What made you become a fan? Write about your fannish history on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanfiction in the lexicon

    By Claudia Rebaza on Domenica, 8 June 2014 - 4:43pm
    Message type:

    Banner by James of a quill pen resting on a sheet of paper with writing on it

    • Gamescene hosted a paper on Fanfiction as Critical Play. "By allowing the larger fan community to access and interact with the fanfiction, the piece contributes to the larger agency of the fans over the source universe. This allows for more fans to participate in the remolding of a fiction that they did not create, examining societal, cultural, political, and personal themes through both the inherently subversive act of writing fanfiction, and through the content and themes contained within the individual fanfiction. The fanfiction writer employs concepts such as unplaying, reskinning, and rewriting in order to acknowledge and further explore the subversive elements of their version of the source. This makes fanfiction a form of critical play."
    • The Asian Age discussed Bollywood fanfiction. “'The joy lies in weaving new narratives with the characters you love,' says Aayat Malik, a DU student and Fanfiction writer whose present work-in-progress brings Harry Potter’s Patil twins to Mumbai after completing their magical education at Hogwarts, also incorporating characters from the recent Hindi movie, Hasee Toh Phasee...She goes on to point out how visiting many popular Indian entertainment websites brings to notice that the largest volume in terms of the sheer number and length of Fanfiction writings exists in the realm of Indian television."
    • Gizmodo explained design fanfiction. "There's actually an existing analog for this trend: Fanfiction. The comparison isn't as far flung as it seems. It's just where fanfic writers turn their own creativity upon existing characters and plot lines from their favorite books or TV shows, designers turn to their favorite Brands. Spec episodes of My Little Pony and ludicrous concepts for the next iPhone have a lot in common."
    • Various media outlets took note of the fannish terms, such as fangirl, being added to the dictionary by Merriam-Webster. The Times of India devoted some time to explaining 'shipping'. "Usually, fans will give a couple their own moniker, often a portmanteau of their names. X-Files fans liked to use Sculder or MSR (quite simply Mulder-Scully Romance). Any kind of relationship can be acknowledged. From the obvious 'will they, won't they' couples to inter-species intimacy, one rule of the shipping community is that if at least one person wants to see a certain pairing, then it's a legitimate ship. Nor is it limited to modern-day culture; you'll find sites dedicated to shipping the heroes and heroines of classic literature, such as Jo and Laurie in Little Women."

    What fanfiction terms have you learned about? Create some entries for them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fans running the culture

    By Claudia Rebaza on Mercoledì, 28 May 2014 - 4:14pm
    Message type:

    Banner by Diane of a concert crowd depicted as colored outlines

    • Arthur Chu wrote at the Daily Beast about Battlestar Galactica as the turning point for fanfiction invading popular culture. "[T]echnological change has accelerated to the point where nerdy and obsessive and living inside your own personal fantasy world you seek to realize is not only no longer the liability it once was, it’s practically a requirement for the new economy. Try getting a job at a 'disruptive' Web 2.0 start-up and saying that your favorite entertainment is reassuring sitcoms about ordinary domestic life. The creepy kid who was once ostracized for drawing weird futuristic cityscapes populated by cyborgs all day is now your boss, and his utopian/dystopian vision for the future just got him a million-dollar round of investor capital."
    • Mary Grace Garis at Elle agrees, discussing how fanfiction made her a writer. "[W]e live in a weird postmodern society that celebrates media reinvention. People livetweet Scandal and then write think pieces on why Olivia should end up alone. They form snarky communities in the comment section of episode recaps. They create dialogues, make critiques, and most of all, take creative agency with these texts, be it in the form of memes or mashups. So knowing this, as well as insider language that communicates fan ideas and beliefs, is valuable currency in this economy."
    • Alan Kistler wrote at The Mary Sue about a psychology of cult TV panel. "Scarlet added, 'I think that TV shows allow us to form a really important connection at a time when we really need it.' She then had the audience show, by raising their hands, how many of them had gone through something difficult in their lives and then saw the experience or the feelings surrounding it reflected in a favorite TV show, book or comic book. Many hands went up. Scarlet said, 'It can feel really validating and you can feel like someone gets it . . . Over time, we learn to trust characters. We learn to open up with them, we become vulnerable with them.'"
    • The Phillipine Daily Inquirer discussed the pop-culturization of Philippine mythology. "'Our teen readers gobble up YA novels from the US. They’re reading! We should give them Filipino YA novels to gobble up.' The Philippine Board on Books for Young People, of which Sabido is chair, is putting together a 2014 middle grade and YA novel writing workshop called 'Kabanata.' 'We hope the workshop will produce 10 novels in English and 10 novels in Filipino.'" They hope to hook readers by developing fan communities. "'We’re really hoping people would contribute their fan art and fan fiction when they finally get to know the world of Janus Silang'."

    What examples of fans running their cultures have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom risks

    By Claudia Rebaza on Domenica, 11 May 2014 - 3:22pm
    Message type:

    • A variety of articles derived from an Anhui TV segment reported that 20 women writing slash fiction were arrested in China as part of an effort to "create a healthy cyberspace." As The Diplomat pointed out though, the purge was very narrowly targeted. "Indeed, if the various crackdowns in the past were actually aimed at porn, it’s hard to understand how some of the largest porn sites have somehow slipped through the cracks. If you want to read reports from Amnesty International or the New York Times in China, you are bang out of luck unless you have a VPN. Still, the glorious proletariat can look at Porn.com until they’re blue in the face."
    • Anuradha Lingappa wrote in the Whitman College Pioneer about sexual assaults in Harry Potter fandom. "The recent accusations mirror an incident a couple years ago when an Internet-famous musician who wrote songs about similarly 'nerdy' topics was arrested on several counts of child pornography. He pled guilty to soliciting sexually explicit content from underage fans. He moved in the same circles as some of the men who are currently accused, even accompanying their bands on tour. The response to his arrest was disappointing. No one wanted to talk about it. If there had been serious discussion about preventing sexual violence within fandoms, maybe things wouldn’t have gotten so far."
    • Author N.K. Jemisin discussed confirmation bias. "Confirmation bias doesn’t cause the phenomenon of Mysteriously Whitewashed Medieval Europe. (Or Peculiarly Denuded of Women Europe, or Puzzlingly Focused On The Nobility Europe, or any of the other bizarre things we tend to see in medieval Europe-flavored fantasy.) Confirmation bias causes the freakouts that occur whenever somebody points out these phenomena, and names them as inaccuracies. Like the 'go kill yourself' messages Medieval PoC has gotten for simply pointing out that people of color could easily have been present in a game set in central Bohemia."

    What examples of fandom risks have you seen? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in an OTW Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Changing & Changed

    By Claudia Rebaza on Martedì, 22 April 2014 - 4:10pm
    Message type:

    Banner by Bremo of Pikachu dancing in excitement while a horde of other Pokémon characters look on in annoyance.

    • Slate was among several sites which wrote about the fanfiction-writing, Avengers-loving Ms Marvel. However, Slate also pointed out the important role fandom had in launching her. "A diverse and exuberant fan community, the Carol Corps, emerged almost overnight and began tweeting, blogging and cosplaying their love for both the character and DeConnick. (It’s worth noting that in addition to offering sharp writing and great stories, the new series let Carol trade her revealing leotard and domino mask for an actual body-covering uniform.)"
    • As The Daily Dot points out, fans will also appropriate existing heroes to address current concerns. "Most of the time, fandom’s remix culture is about taking a particular detail from a book or movie, and expanding upon it until it tells the story you wanted to hear in the first place." Captain America is an interesting example of this treatment. "There’s even an ongoing debate on Tumblr over just what aspects of Cap’s backstory would support the widespread headcanon that Steve Rogers is a feminist, socialist, socially liberal guy."
    • At Reflexive Horizons, Laz Carter writes about Pokémon and a Fandom of Nostalgia. "[T]the very ‘franchise’ model propagated by Pokémon – wherein one can consume the Pokémon universe through not only film but also animated television series, videogames, comics, trading card games, theme parks, merchandise and a plethora of other Poké-paraphernalia – means that any attempt to usefully separate one medium from the rest remains a futile endeavour that does not benefit any serious study." Carter argues that "When examining examples of ‘franchise fandom’, one must account for the fact that a consumer’s experiences of any given aspect of the product will affect their appreciation of the remainder...I argue that 2014 has seen a revival of ‘Poké-mania’, albeit a different brand of the fervour which had been evident during the peak of Pokémon’s success."
    • kpopstarz also looks at changing fandom, specifically Idol Fandom. "The beginning of 1st generation idols, H.O.T, was labeled the 'teen's idol.' However, idols are no longer the exclusive property of teen fans. As the idol market grew, idol fandoms have been overtaken by fans in their 20s and 30s...These adult fans are nothing to be trifled with, and are showing great influence. Now idol groups must not only target teens, but also focus on catering to the 2030 fans." However, these new fans show a very old pattern of behavior. "Upon conducting a survey, it was found that many fans in their 20s keep their activity on fan sites a secret. In many cases their identity as a fan was kept a secret to everyone except maybe some family members or close friends."

    What fandom developments have you been seeing? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in an OTW Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: How fandom works

    By Claudia Rebaza on Domenica, 13 April 2014 - 5:32pm
    Message type:

    Banner by dogtagsandsmut of the post title layered over a series of gears.

    • The question of how fandom works has been popping up in the media. Entertainment Weekly used the finale of True Detective to raise the question: 'Does modern TV fandom actually make it harder to understand TV shows?' "I wonder if the conversation around True Detective made the show seem more ambitious than it actually was. I wonder what it would be like if we could have those conversations about shows that do have a deeper point beyond 'Good vs. Evil.'" (Spoiler warning for the series).
    • At The Mary Sue, Rachael Berkey used the return of Veronica Mars to look at changing fandom. "I was seventeen when I joined my first fandom. It was 1999, and Rent was kind of a big deal...Fandom feels like a completely different beast in 2014. There’s a lingo to it you have to translate until you really go native." She believes that "Fandom has hit its stride in the second decade of the new millennium. Thanks to successful fan-funded projects like the Veronica Mars movie, the great things about being a part of a fandom are being pulled right out into the open."
    • Bronies for Good posted a podcast of Feminism and the Fandom. "One of the core aspects of My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic is how it strives to provide empowerment for young girls through a medium that is typically unfavorable to women. As part of the content blitz for International Women’s Day discussed in more detail in our previous post, and in collaboration with The Round Stable, we have invited fellow fans to discuss femininity, feminism, and women’s issues in the context of MLP:FiM and its fandom." (No transcript available).
    • NPR's Code Switch transcribed their discussion of race in World of Warcraft. Although the interview began by saying "Don't worry, this isn't about racial disparities between black, Latino and Asian players", in fact the discussion does end up there. "DEMBY: So there were no, like, guilds full of young Latino kids? SCHELLDORF: I never met a single person with a 'Hispanic-sounding' accent on the game. But I can say that those who sounded Asian or black were less welcomed...HERNANDEZ: I wish I had found a Latino guild! It would have made things way easier. A friend actually joined an Australian guild one time on accident, so there are definitely some guilds with national or racial identity out there. For us it was about finding a good raiding guild, and eventually a good raiding guild that didn't hate on our accent."

    What factors about how fandom works have you noticed? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom challenges

    By Claudia Rebaza on Mercoledì, 5 February 2014 - 7:00pm
    Message type:

    • NPR's Code Switch asked Who Gets To Be A Superhero?. "But an artist named Orion Martin noted that the X-Men comics have on the receiving end of much real-life discrimination: the main lineup in the X-Men team has been mostly straight, white dudes...So Martin decided to reimagine them, recoloring some famous panels so that the main characters are brown — a gimmick that changes the subtext and stakes for the X-people."
    • A post on Flayrah discussed what makes furries a fandom. "Fandoms revolve around a common interest, not a canon. At times the common interest will also serve as the canon, in such things as the Doctor Who fandom or the Pokémon fandom, but at other times the common interest will be more vague, such as the anime fandom, the sci-fi fandom and the furry fandom. In those cases the fans are fans of a concept that can encompass many different fandoms due to a common element. Furry certainly has what we can term a canon. Fred Patten has compiled a long, but incomplete, list of works that influenced and led to the formation of the furry fandom between 1966-1996."
    • Gamer Zarnyx discussed early prejudices and missing past experiences. "I am aware that had A Link Between Worlds been my first game in the series, I would have been voicing an entirely different opinion. I am aware that it is a little bit selfish to dismiss the game as 'just another Zelda game', just as I am aware it would be ridiculous of me (again) to dismiss Nintendo and tell you my faith is wavering. That's not my intent for a company who has given me more amazing memories than forgettable ones and continues to do so even now...But as I listened to my sister's gleeful squeals sprinkled in with the 'oh no' moments of hearing death approaching...I wanted that excitement too instead of the occasional jaded groan I mustered when encountering some of the same things I encountered on so many adventures before this one."

    What fandom challenges have you experienced? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: 2013 Recaps

    By Claudia Rebaza on Lunedì, 13 January 2014 - 4:39pm
    Message type:

    Banner by Erin of  a collage of various TV show characters.

    • The Backlot's Shipping News series was among those providing a look back at 2013. They recounted various important moments for slash fandoms, such as May's Saturday Night Live event. "In a whirlwind skit that included cameos from Ben Affleck to Anderson Cooper; Seth Meyer and Hader’s character, Stefon, tied the knot! In perhaps one of the best OTP-becomes-canon moments ever, Meyers gave his usual Weekend Update sign off as, 'For Weekend Update, we are Seth and Stefon Meyers, good night!'"
    • The Learned Fangirl looked at gaming content in 2013. "By 'women in games,' I mean 'female characters, preferably protagonists, featured in games,' not women in the industry or in journalism or criticism. In short, this is not another review of Anita Sarkeesian or the Ada Initiative (both worthy causes)." She concluded that "The real issue I ran into was the dearth of such games from which to choose; given that there are dozens of major industry games released every year, it seems sad that I can’t come up with a top ten list because there aren’t ten games that fit the basic criteria. But at least none of the top five – even the top seven – feature cooking, sewing, or having babies… because female gamers enjoy shooting things, too."
    • Vulture looked at 2013 TV ratings to see who was watching what. "Some shows you'd expect to have a more youthful audience still have plenty of Gen-Xers and above watching, though. The median age of the Glee viewer is now 41; CW's Arrow is up to 48 (two years older than that of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.)." Meanwhile "Among African-American adult viewers under 50, Scandal is the No. 1 non-sports show on broadcast, doubling the numbers of the No. 2 show of 2013 (American Idol) and nearly tripling the ratings of the No. 3 show, lead-in Grey's Anatomy. Among Latinos and Asians under 50, however, comedy rules: The Big Bang Theory and Modern Family finish No. 1 and 2, respectively. (By contrast, those two comedies don't even crack the top twenty with African-Americans.) Among the major networks, Fox does particularly well with minority audiences: It has seven of the top twenty shows with African-Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinos."

    What 2013 recaps do you have to share? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

Pagine

Subscribe to Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality