Commercialization of Fans

  • OTW Fannews: For the Benjamins

    By Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 28 April 2015 - 4:50pm
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    Banner by Sidhrat of U.S. $100 bills floating in the air with the title 'OTW Fannews: For the Benjamins'

    • PC Gamer discussed a Half-Life fan's job offer after releasing a popular mod. "Transmissions: Element 120 is a "short single-player" Half-life 2 mod that equips players with a new kind of gravity gun that enables them to leap over buildings and fall from great distances without suffering damage. Taking place after the events of Half-Life 2: Episode 2, it challenges players to figure out where they are and why they've been sent there. On the technical side, it boasts custom levels, code, models, sounds, and a number of upgrades to the Source Engine, including enhanced dynamic lighting, improved support for complex structures, and better AI. And it was all created by one guy."
    • Los Angeles magazine instead suggested that fan films could be personal vehicles. "Fantasy author and captain’s hat aficionado, George R.R. Martin, famously hates fan-fiction based on his Game of Thrones universe, but it’s an uphill battle for Martin, judging by the popularity of his characters amongst online amateur writers with a penchant for sword fights, dragons, and magic. And it’s not just the literary kind Martin has to worry about. Now, fan made videos that either recreate scenes from certain episodes (“The Red Wedding” is a favorite) or spin-offs that feature new characters and plot lines but are still set in the world of Westeros are popping up on YouTube. Some are predictably terrible and a lot like Jack Black and Mos Def’s attempts at recreating their favorite movies in Be Kind Rewind but others are downright genius."
    • There are certainly more commercial projects that are creating spaces for readers to join in with their own contributions. But publishers are also on the lookout for anything that's getting popular. Kidscreen reported on HarperCollins offering a contract to a fanfic writer for his Minecraft series "that’s been making the rounds in middle schools across the US. Wolfe wrote at the first part of the trilogy at age 16 and then self-published it on Amazon.com in January, 2014."
    • Meanwhile Supernatural actors Rob Benedict and Richard Speight, Jr. are creating a show based on their convention appearances. The "crowd-funded show called Kings Of Con — a fictional series that follows an exaggerated version of Rob and Richard...will follow their experiences during their 15 annual international cons, in which the fans aren't the only crazy ones — but the cast is as well."

    Whether projects about fans or projects by fans, is everyone going commercial? Write about those events in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Product Placement

    By .Lindsey D on Sunday, 5 April 2015 - 5:34pm
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    • Vulture released a series of articles on fanfiction, including an attempt to unravel "My Immortal", and a look at some published authors discussing fanfiction activities. "[T]he undeniable signature of a writer’s fic orientation isn’t eroticism but confession, the frank and extended discussion of emotions. If porn offers men the vision of women whose carnality is neither elusive nor mysterious, fic offers its mostly women readers men whose inner lives are wide-open books — not so easy to find in popular culture. Whether these imaginary Spocks or Justin Biebers are straight or gay, theirs is a love that not only dares to speak its name but will happily go on talking about itself for thousands of words at a time."
    • While fanfic has gone on for not just thousands of words but thousands of years, there are constant claims about what was its first example. A recent one was made by the president of the local chapter of the Jane Austen Society of North America. "Thompson has written extensively about Jane Austen fandom, and she has an article coming out in the United Kingdom: “Crafting Jane: Handmade homages and their makers.” Even Jane Austen fandom was ahead of its time. The ultimate contemporary fan tribute is to write your own stories, set in the world of your favorite author-filmmaker. 'I'll be talking about the first translation of ‘Sense and Sensibility' into French from 1817...The writer didn't like the end of the book, so she rewrote it. It represents the first fan fiction.'"
    • ABC Newcastle, Australia sought to find the origins of fandom. "When people can be so unwavering and loyal to their fanaticisms, what are the ethical boundaries around organisations not exploiting their product's fans? Melanie James believes fans can be viewed in different ways. 'Fandom is cultivated by organisations. Football clubs want their fans; movie franchises want their fans...A marketer would look at a fan quite differently [to someone else]. [Marketers could think], 'There is a potential person for me to make a lot of money out of, because they're going to buy the t-shirt, the video, the game, the costume and go to the movies.' They're a commodity.'"
    • Wattpad certainly seems to think so. A story in It Business, Canada reported on a marketing to millennials talk that revealed that product placement is something the company is attempting to use with its writers. For example they have fit "existing stories to brands, with ads for Taylor Swift’s new album performing well inside pieces of fan fiction featuring Taylor Swift. Brands have also written their own stories for Wattpad readers, with writers of the new USA Network TV series Dig writing stories for the platform. Brands have also created a whole campaign around a Wattpad story. The company has a very large following in the Philippines, and Unilever wanted to reach it to promote its Eskinol pimple cream. They commissioned a Wattpad writer to write a story about someone getting a pimple just before a date." Their strategy is to obscure the marketing aspect as much as possible. "When we failed, it obviously looked and felt like an ad."

    How have you seen fanworks being co-opted for marketing use? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanficcers for Hire

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 29 March 2015 - 4:51pm
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    • Westword featured a story on another app targeted to fandom for content aggregation. It allows users to create separate collections, or 'nests', for different fandom content. Its creator "examined how many people watch certain shows, what percentage are female, the number of fan fictions posted online, and how many hits those fictions garner. As a result, she can now confidently estimate that there are about 10 million fangirls" in the US.
    • The Verge was among several sites discussing the new Wattpad app which promises to curate content for users. "The app is curated, breaking its mature-rated stories up by content-specific channels such as 'southern romance,' 'urban,' and 'panty droppers.' As on Wattpad itself, users can comment and vote through the app, which for now, is only available on the App Store. The app will also feature regular romance stories alongside its fan fiction, but Melissa Shapiro, Wattpad's head of marketing, says it's the celeb-focused stories that drove the app's creation. 'On the heels of the release of Fifty Shades of Grey, interest in mature stories has spiked,' Shapiro said."
    • Apparently erotica is in such demand that some are hiring fanficcers to write it. Seven Days interviewed a Vermont-based ghostwriter. "After she left her corporate job because of childcare issues, Croteau relates, she searched for freelance writing work on the networking platform oDesk. She "found that there were a number of people looking to have someone write an erotica story or a romance story for them. I thought, 'I used to write it for fanfic [fan fiction]; might as well,' she recalls, "and found that there's something really fun about writing about sex.'"
    • While nothing's stopping fanficcers from finding a platform to sell from, The Globe and Mail looked at the After Dark app as part of Wattpad's reader battle with Amazon. "Instead of major publishing houses deciding who gets printed, it’s readers themselves who choose, McIlroy said. 'The most radical thing is the passionate interaction between the writer and reader that’s not intermediated by a bunch of pompous fools who say, ‘We know better than any of you.’' Other players are sure to appear. "[D]igital authors are attracting crowdfunding, online readers have become editors and stories are being turned into games by companies such as Google Inc.’s Niantic Labs."

    Where have you seen fanficcers hired to write for pay? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Shark & Ranger Takedowns

    By Pip Janssen on Friday, 20 March 2015 - 4:36pm
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    Banner by Rachel of a generic Newspaper banner with the OTW logo and the words OTW Fannews

    • Bloomberg BNA was one of many sites to write about a dispute over a Power Rangers fan film created by professional director Joseph Kahn. It was taken down from Vimeo in response to a takedown notice under the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act from the owner of the Power Rangers franchise. Although it was later permitted to be rehosted, the case raised a number of interesting questions about fair use and who would have prevailed in court. A post on Entertainment Geekly also questioned the 'fan film' label and the intentions for the film.
    • Legal Professor Paul Heald speculated over 3-D shark designs being sold online after their appearance in Katy Perry's Superbowl performance. "The generally accepted position is that clothing is not protected by copyright. The copyright act contains a long list of what’s protected: literary works; musical works; plays; choreographic works; pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works; movies; sound recordings; and architectural works. Where would clothes fit? Well, the best you can do is sculptural works—they are sort of thin 3D sculpture. However, within that category, costume designers run into a problem called the “useful article” doctrine which disqualifies utilitarian sculptural works...It is generally accepted that clothing is unprotected [because] [i]ts design is intrinsic to its function."
    • Kimberly Anne Tan interviewed a bookseller on Urban Wire about fanfiction. Asked whether fan fiction should be recognised as literature, Anthony Koh Waugh replied, "Literature, to me, means written works of quality and artistic merit. There are fan fiction inspired by classic works and popular fiction and among them, some are better written than the others. I see fan fiction as a creative innovation and whether or not the genre should be recognised as literature will depend on the acceptance by the literary circle." However asked if he would sell fan fiction, he said "Of course! Fan fiction is a form of creative writing. Having said that, it also depends on how a particular book fits within our curation criteria."
    • Certainly it's increasingly easy to find, even in published form. Zaire's Books Alive featured discussion of a short story by Kiru Taye, a Nigerian-born novelist residing in the United Kingdom, noting that she had written an erotic fan fiction short story inspired by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s novel Americanah.

    What fanworks have you seen affected by takedown notices? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Commercial Weirdness

    By Kiri Van Santen on Thursday, 12 March 2015 - 4:29pm
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    • A post at Wired featured images from a new book on science fiction zines of the 1940s through 1960s. "Despite being produced with a limited tool set, and existing in a vastly different milieu, these hacked-together pamphlets laid the groundwork for modern day fandoms. 'The most surprising thing I noticed about the zines was how closely the format—editorials, letters, essays, reviews—paralleled the format of blogs,' says co-author Jack Womack. 'All this stuff is proto-blog, proto-Instagram, proto-snark, proto-troll, and naturally, also an active exchange of ideas that motivated some very weird people to do great things in their life,' adds co-author Johan Kugelberg."
    • The word "weird" seems to be perpetually attached to fanworks, as an article in Yahoo! Movies UK made apparent. The word seems to go missing though when discussing commercial contests, even when they are pitched at underage fans and propose improbable sources. "Mondelez will pick 10 finalists for Wattpad's community to vote on. The company will then turn the winner's story into an animated digital film and promote it on Sour Patch Kids' social platforms. 'We're really just continuing to further build out our relationship with influencers...We know that these are the new celebrities for teens, and they have a much more authentic voice, so we're really putting our brand in their hands and allowing them to create on our behalf.'"
    • Efforts to enroll fans as company pitchmen seem to be booming. A post at Good E Reader spoke uncritically about Skrawl's business model, also directed at kids. It "is already in place in more than 20,000 schools in 60 countries and has been responsible for more than 2 million writing contests, allows story collaboration based on engagement and a points system. One user will post a story, then others will add their own sections to it." Skrawl's CEO stated "[A]s publishers hunger for popular content while cutting promotional budgets, such ready-formed, literate and eBook submissions are likely to become a great place to find talent."
    • Perhaps some of the term's use comes from anxiety. In discussing romance fandom, The Washington Post said, "Fan relations are enormous in the romance world, and romance readers come in all shapes and sizes, from all backgrounds. But they’re almost never male. 'The last thing popular romance needs is a man in a suit ‘mansplaining’ what belongs in the canon,' said DePaul University professor Eric Selinger, the rare man at the conference who actually adores romance fiction...'There are not a lot of us who read these books,' he admitted. 'There’s this thinking that men are not interested in love, which doesn’t make a lot of sense when you look at popular music. For many of the men, they find the books tremendously intimidating.'"

    What terms are you tired of seeing connected to fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Shades of Fanworks

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 22 February 2015 - 7:08pm
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    Banner by James Baxter of colored pencils arranged in a circle around the title Shades of Fanworks

    • The release of Fifty Shades of Grey in theaters led to a wave of stories connecting it to its fanfiction roots. A post at MoviePilot though, focused on fan art for the fandom.
    • Vodkaster asked if the movie was about what women wanted or what fans wanted (article in French). Writer Johanna Ruiz cited surveys showing that literature was a particularly female format, and stated that women were embracing writing online to create their own literature. She further suggested that there's a deficiency in representing women's desire in commercial production which has led to its expression within fanfiction.
    • Independent focused on the new markets reached by the book, while overlooking fandom entirely. "While there are all sorts of negative connotations around erotic fiction, what the mainstream publishing world never really reckoned on was the fact that women actually wanted to read these books.... Somehow EL James and a respectable publisher managed to introduce pornography to a demographic that are ordinarily notoriously porn-proof. This was soft porn for suburbia, erotica made accessible, not to mention acceptable, through its coverage in the respectable pages of the Sunday supplements."
    • Vanity Fair renewed claims that literary agents are searching fan fiction sites for the next Fifty Shades of Grey. "Her pitch to publishing houses was forthright about the book’s origins, but she didn’t lead with its fanfic roots, admitting, 'In many ways the way in which you enter publishing determines where you will be.' At the time, there was also a sense that the Fifty Shades effect wouldn’t have staying power. 'There were definitely editors that said they thought [fan] fic was over, which I think is funny in retrospect because that was 2012, and how many deals have there been since then?'"

    What are all the deals you know about of fanfic that was pulled to publish? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Commercial Exploits

    By Kiri Van Santen on Friday, 23 January 2015 - 5:27pm
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    • Many fans of Fall Out Boy launched a petition to protest a proposed event by podcaster Jensen Karp which would revolve around reading "the most ridiculous REAL fanfiction about them on the web." The event was later cancelled though it remained unclear how much participation the band itself had had in the plans.
    • The use of fans' work by third parties was less clear in an announcement by YouTube gamer PewDiePie who launched a fanfic contest with himself as the subject, noting that "The contest will be sponsored by Mountain Dew." Three finalists would have their story submission turned into an animated video. The Terms and Conditions of the contest noted that aside from transferring the rights to all entries (whether they were winners or not) to "Sponsor, Administrator and their agents along with PewDiePie" that the fanworks "must not denegrate the subject, Mountain Dew brand, product and/or trademark."
    • At the American Library Association's District Dispatch, Carrie Russell bemoaned the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act process that also forces OTW Legal to repeatedly defend the exemptions it won for fan video makers in 2009 and 2012. "Here’s the problem: Sometimes DRM gets in the way of actions that are not infringements of copyright. Let’s say you have lawful access to an e-book (you bought the book, fair and square), but you are a person with a print disability, and you need to circumvent to enable text-to-speech (TTS) functionality which has been disabled by DRM. This is a violation of the circumvention provision. One would think that this kind of circumvention is reasonable, because it simply entails making a book accessible to the person that purchased it." Russell called for the exemptions to be made permanent and eliminate the months of time spent by petitioners and government alike.
    • An article in The Guardian highlighted the various benefits of new technology in expanding what producers and consumers are able to exchange (even if fans had long been there first). "The rise of these electronic devices built only for reading has been a boon to the books sector. The transition to digital reading brought with it a new kind of publishing that was distinctly more experimental, energetic and (nakedly) commercial than that which preceded it. Just this week the publisher Little, Brown began publishing ebook shorts based on the hugely successful Broadchurch TV series that are made available to download in the hours after each show."

    How have you seen fans' work adopted and co-opted? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Using Fans

    By Pip Janssen on Sunday, 11 January 2015 - 5:29pm
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    Title written in Star Wars style font by Bremo

    • MacWorld discussed Fancred, a new effort at a social networking site for sports fans. "The sports fan-focused social network is quietly building momentum in a quest to do for sports what LinkedIn has done for professionals. 'We think we’re building the world’s largest fan network,' said CEO Kash Razzaghi." Their strategy involves turning fans into marketing pros. "[T]he platform is also targeting college campuses in a strategy that cribs liberally from the playbook of popular messaging apps. Fancred offers college internships to students who want to be the app’s brand ambassadors... Gaining users on campus will translate to professional growth."
    • Some other sites are cribbing more than fans' time for their projects. Rocket News 24 pointed out how a Nintendo character montage included a fan's artwork. "With over 12 million members and billions of page views per day, Japanese art submission site Pixiv is submitted to by up-and-coming creatives the world over, making it one of the best places for people to showcase their work and get noticed. While few artists have a problem with their work being featured or embedded on other sites–indeed, with proper citation many are glad of the free publicity–Pixiv’s terms of use make it explicitly clear that users should not take or insert a featured artist’s work in another product without prior permission."
    • Meanwhile Fashion & Style speculated that the new Star Wars film would include a fan-created character. "Another name on the list is Captain Phasma, a character who, as SK points out, has only appeared in a fanfic called "Tarkin's Fist". Despite the limited information about the role, /Film, who picked up the story earlier this week, speculates that Gwendoline Christie is a strong contender for the part."
    • The Hollywood Reporter discussed Paramount's use of Wattpad to promote the film Project Almanac. "Wattpad's 35 million users, read, write and engage with stories uploaded online, including a fair amount of fan fiction. The platform...is particularly popular among young women and previously partnered with films like Fox's The Fault in Our Stars, Universal's The Purge: Anarchy and Ouija and three Relativity titles: last year's Romeo and Juliet, Best of Me and Beyond the Lights... 'We have been watching Wattpad for quite some time and think it's a really exciting and new emerging online social destination, not only for young adult book fans to discover and share stories, but beyond that, it's becoming a kind of a hub and influencer-type community, and something that's been bubbling up in terms of social platforms,' Paramount's senior vp, interactive marketing Megan Wahtera tells THR."

    How have you seen fans being used for commercial projects? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Developing a Clue

    By Kiri Van Santen on Tuesday, 30 December 2014 - 5:50pm
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    graphic by Sidhrat of a road swooping into the sky

    • Gamasutra featured a post by James Cox that discussed his struggle to define fanfiction. "Even bad Mary Sue fan fiction has its place. Have you ever read My Immortal?... I read the whole thing once as an endurance test. It’s atrocious, but enjoyably so. Almost like a masochistic fun. After all of this, my new definition of fan fiction is as follows: Fan fiction is a thing that some people do; it usually involves being inspired by another’s work. Some fan fiction is good. Some is bad. That’s about as in depth as I can go right now with my definition. Fan fiction became such a blanket term: how some fan fiction became so successful, how creative people can write it, how it’s hard to tell if a work is a fan fiction or if it just draws on the lore of another work. Is Tolkien just fan fiction of Anglo-Saxon and Norse mythology?"
    • While a lot of people seem to struggle with the definition of fanfiction, other sites seem to be particularly clueless when it comes to fandom activities. For example, in an article on Lost Remote the author discusses the site Moviepilot which gives some contributors to its writing platform extra perks for particular content. The author concludes "Not only is it worth knowing who your fans are, the platform works because it’s authentic: fans talking to fans without any pretense. Where else can one be really, really, sad about “The Walking Dead” winter finale or gush over “Doctor Who” donuts?"
    • Moviepilot's hardly alone in wanting to monetize fan activities. In a Guardian blogpost, Victoria James suggested Amazon wants to take on Wattpad as the premiere site for amateur writers. "The internet shopping site has just launched its own social reading and writing platform, Kindle WriteOn, a move characterised by Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian as 'trying to eat [Wattpad’s] lunch'." There is already a space for fanfic but "[s]o far the fan fiction category appears unloved – “0 reads 0 likes 0 follows 0 comments” is the pitiless tally of a bowtie-themed “crossover” between Dr Who and the Thor movieverse. Perhaps the invitations haven’t yet reached fan fiction fans, or maybe the problem is the space Amazon built for fanfic writers last year: Kindle Worlds."
    • Even people in fandom can use tips sometimes, highlighted by a post in Podfic Tips offering ways to comment about podfic. "One of the topics that caught my attention through this year's pod-aware was feedback, and having tools to leave feedback. Sometimes, especially if we're more used to leaving comments on other types of fanworks or if like me the Fandom Language (often: English) isn't the language we're most comfortable with, we're at a loss for words. As such, when leaving comments on podfics, or when reccing podfics, I like to build myself a little vocabulary list. Here's my lists of what I often comment on and what words I choose from, in case it might help others."

    What fandom definitions and practices do you know about? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Profiles in Marketing

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 14 December 2014 - 6:32pm
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    Banner by Erin of Barbie working at a computer with the OTW logo on it, with two adults looking on in the background. The banner reads 'OTW Fannews: Profiles in Marketing'.

    • An increasing number of companies are marketing toward girls and women in tech, but not every attempt to capitalise on the trend is well-executed. NPR covered widespread criticism of Mattel's Barbie: I Can Be A Computer Engineer. “‘It starts so promising; Barbie is designing a game to show kids how computers work,’ said Ribon. […] Brian and Steven take over — and, at the end of the day, Barbie takes credit for the boys' work.” OTW Legal staffer Casey Fiesler, whose feminist remix went viral and was featured in the NPR story, took to her own blog to explain why non-commercial remix is allowed under US copyright law. "It is so amazing how many people care about representation of women in computing, and I’m thrilled and humbled that something I created helped to expand this conversation. I wrote a piece for Slate about the process and the ideas behind Barbie, Remixed, but something I wanted to discuss in more detail was the act of remix itself rather than the critique behind it."
    • TribLIVE reported on a new TV network focused on fandom. "When Pop, a cable network most people probably refer to as TVGN, launches Jan. 14, it will do so with programs that celebrate the continuing ability of such, well, institutions, as New Kids On the Block and 'Everybody Loves Raymond' to cut a swath through popular culture."
    • UK site YouGov researches audiences to determine the characteristics of people with particular interests or fandoms. By using their profiler you could discover that Good Omens fans are more likely to be 40-59 year old males who work in IT, are left leading when it comes to politics, and also are fans of John Barrowman, Stephen Fry, James May, Nathan Fillion and Patrick Moore.
    • The publishing industry is among those wanting to target fans, and a recent conference on the children's book trade included a panel on fanfiction. Meanwhile Wikia is declaring itself "the ultimate source for powerful and relevant pop culture, entertainment and game expertise" and is producing a video series on fandom in 2014 along with Disney's Maker Studios. The idea is to create amateur/professional partnerships. "The partnership has already resulted in some quirky combinations, including one pairing of a devotee of the AMC period drama Mad Men with the creator of the Drinks Made Easy YouTube channel. 'We hope to continue to define projects that allow for creators and super fans to come together and be in the spotlight.'"

    What marketing efforts utilizing fans have you spotted? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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