Ważne informacje

  • OTW Fannews: Fanfic and publishing models

    Claudia Rebaza - Wtorek, 10 września 2013 - 6:07pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Banner by Natasha of ink and quill pen

    • Digital Book World examined the motivations for including Kurt Vonnegut in the Kindle Worlds program and concluded that fanfiction = marketing. "The backlist works of iconic authors fundamentally need exposure and marketing. That’s how fans of one book choose to read others by the author, and how new readers discover the work. The marketing budgets of large, traditional publishers are overwhelmingly focused on their frontlist offerings, so the backlist is forced to 'sell itself.' This is not the practice of the movie, music or textbook business, but it is the practice of trade publishers."
    • OTW legal staffer Rebecca Tushnet also addressed Kindle Worlds in an article on Airship Daily. “Amazon’s doing an experiment, and the good thing about not paying advances is there's not a huge amount of overheads,” she explains. Groups like OTW are pushing back at Amazon’s exploitation of their genre. “It’s just another business model representing another way of Mechanical Turk-ization the world of literature."
    • Fast Company had an interview with Philip Patrick, director of business development and publisher of Kindle Worlds, who claimed Amazon wanted fanfic of properties that were already selling well on its site. Asked what "makes one author’s work more 'fan fic-able' than another?" he replied "Really it comes down to great storytelling, compelling characters, and vibrant geographies that writers are excited to explore. Some Worlds are more current or popular than others, of course, but there are many iconographic works and characters that Kindle Worlds writers are going to love, like Billy Pilgrim."
    • A writer at the Huffington Post described what may be the new reader pattern: Finished Your Favorite Book/Show? Try Fan Fiction. "Despite stereotypes to the contrary, fan fictions can be quite entertaining and of very high quality. It is not uncommon for fan fictions to be better than their source material. Continuity and fluctuations in tone are less of an issue with fan fiction than you might imagine. Consider that your favorite TV Shows are written by a large, revolving group of writers. The multiwriter nature of TV Shows makes many works of fan fiction seem perfectly at home within the rest of a series. In many cases, the only difference between a fan fiction and a canonical manifestation of a fictional universe lies in its creators' willingness to pay for official rights to the brand."

    What stories about fanfic and publishing do you know of? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Anime missing and found

    Claudia Rebaza - Sobota, 7 września 2013 - 4:54pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Anime eyes by Robyn

    • Fantastic Memes discussed how anime fandom affects Japanese language learning. "In English, we have plenty of loan words from the Japanese language – and, particularly in the English-speaking anime fandom, these words take on different meanings and connotations from how they were originally used. It does have an effect on how anime fans (as opposed to textbook users) approach learning Japanese as a second language."
    • Blogger TheBigN discussed transience in anime fandom. "[T]he incoming class of freshmen had what I’d call a sharply divided focus on how they approached anime and fan culture than what I had. While the general format of club activities stayed the same, in choosing shows, their focus was more about shows that entertained...If they didn’t get that, some people would find some other way to get their anime, as this was when fansubs became easily obtainable. And this new group expressed themselves and their fandom more openly, with more participation in some other aspects of culture (from gunpla to cosplay), as well as how they watched anime...But while it wasn’t a sea change, but[sic] the time I graduated college, it definitely felt like my “era” had passed in a way."
    • Blogger Andy Piper praised the Nine Worlds convention citing how it was "an inclusive and diverse event – and that is the standout memory of my 3 days at the con. The range of tracks, fandoms and cultures on offer and on display was outstanding and I enjoyed the opportunity to mix with all kinds of folks and make new friends from across all of them." However while the event had an Indie Comics track, manga was not mentioned in the program and there was no programming that focused on anime either, whereas 6 of the 26 different tracks were focused on roleplay or gaming. The OTW was, however, featured in the Fanfiction track where OTW staffer Lucy Pearson presented Owning the Servers: OTW and AO3 in a post-'50 Shades' world.

    What anime and manga fandom events do you know of? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Analyzing fanfiction

    Claudia Rebaza - Piątek, 30 sierpnia 2013 - 7:27pm
    Typ wiadomości:
    • The Daily Dot wrote about Tumblr user destinationtoast's analysis of fanfic on AO3, which contradicted popular belief. "Explicit stories only make up 18.1% of the total, with G-rated fic being the second most popular rating. So it’s definitely not all 50 Shades of Grey out there. In fact, if you created a fanfic from all the most popular characteristics on AO3, you’d end up with a single-chapter male/male story (M/M takes up a whopping 45.5% of all AO3 content), rated Teen and Up, between one and five thousands words long."
    • Salon reviewed elements of Newsroom fanfiction and concluded journalists would find AUs more appealing. "What’s striking, though, at a glance, is just how few of the stories mention the news. Granted, fan fiction writers tend to focus on the bodice-ripping rather than cerebral elements of their chosen entertainments...Maybe if “The Newsroom” were surgically removed from the news — if Will McAvoy were an iconoclastic lawyer or doctor or, well, president, and MacKenzie McHale his slightly out-of-her-depth co-counsel or chief of surgery or veep — it would seem in better taste. It would be possible to evaluate the relationships as existing in the context of an office, rather than focusing so intently on what about the context is so wrong."
    • Buzzfeed posted an interview with a writer of what was claimed to be the longest fanfic ever. "The Subspace Emissary’s Worlds Conquest is currently over 3,500,000 words, making it almost three times as long as Marcel Proust’s seven-volume À la recherche du temps perdu, six times as long as Infinite Jest, and thirteen times as long as Ulysses. TSEW is “based” on the Nintendo fighting game Super Smash Bros. in the same way that Proust’s novel is “based” on a bite of tea cake, and it is a monumental thing. At present, the work has 28 chapters, which are grouped into a rough structure based on 32-bit role-playing games (Disc One, Disc Two, and so on.)"
    • Numerous sites posted about the live-action version of My Immortal, which "is widely regarded as the worst piece of fan-fiction that this world has ever seen." While it's easier to determine how many words long a story is than how good it is, another question is whether or not the story is even intended as fanfic. "Aside from the nonsensical plot, readers also believe that My Immortal was trolling because of the piece's aggressive assault on grammar and the English language in general."

    What fan analysis posts do you know of? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Who's claiming fanworks?

    Claudia Rebaza - Piątek, 23 sierpnia 2013 - 7:03pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Banner by Robyn with the post title and OTW logo

    • Momentum Books covered the usual concerns about authorship in the fanfic age. But they also cited the case of "Jordin B. Williams’ novel Amazingly Broken that has sparked accusations of intense plagiarism of multiple best sellers, identity fraud, and all-round skullduggery when it came to promoting the book. Readers were furious to find Williams’ book had directly plagiarised large passages from other authors of a similar genre, and the author has since been confusingly linked to a previous fanfiction story with a duplicate plotline...Perhaps these examples are a cautionary tale for aspiring authors looking to utilise online communities, or a warning to publishers to be wary of unknown writers."
    • Who owns fanworks may become a controversial topic, especially if media properties distribute it without saying if they got permission to do so. Collaborative writing projects have been online for a long time with open-source characters. These days successful projects may be closer than ever to fan-created works. Projects such as Wikia's collaborative writing offer is deliberately asking for fan participation. But there's no discussion of contributor rights in their announcement, or what agreements fans might have to sign.
    • Fanfic's ability to generate money is creating more open discussion about a project's fannish roots. But as this post at Today.com (which quotes TWC editor Karen Hellekson) mentions, who will benefit the most from this openness is still unknown. Says Henry Jenkins, "'The gender politics are very real here. The majority of fan fiction is written by women who are telling stories that don’t reach the public, because Hollywood has a hard time telling stories about women's lives.' He hopes that Amazon has women on its Kindle Worlds advisory board who understand the role women play in creating fan fiction 'or they’ll get serious pushback.'"

    What ownership disagreements have you seen surrounding fanworks? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: How to be a fan

    Claudia Rebaza - Środa, 21 sierpnia 2013 - 5:24pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Banner by Bremo saying a fan is someone who has found something they like

    • Morgan Davies wrote about the stages of becoming a Teen Wolf fan. "I used to creep downstairs after my parents had gone to sleep to plug my laptop into the dial-up cable in our family room and load all seventeen chapters of a story in different windows before scurrying back upstairs and reading them all in bed until three in the morning, always ready to snap the computer closed and pretend to be asleep in case anybody came looking. Some years later...I started telling myself that at some point I would outgrow fanfiction, and fandom in general...I kept telling myself this until I was around twenty, or twenty-one, and then I decided that persistent self-delusion wasn’t cute."
    • Being a fan is increasingly being seen as someone who is a producer themselves. Den of Geek collected examples of fan creations memorializing Doctor Who's 50th anniversary. The variety of ways to be creative and share with others keeps expanding.
    • Diana Uy wrote in Manila Standard Today about How to be a Kpop Fangirl, interviewing Gigi Melodias. "Melodias discovered some of her longtime friends through fangirl forums and concerts. In 2009, She collaborated with some of these friends to start FangirlAsia.com, the first online store of Kpop merchandise with its own domain in the Philippines. Today, FangirlAsia.com is owned by Melodias, her husband, and sister. With some extra help, this small band of Kpop fans also organizes artist events and gatherings for loyal Kpop fans."
    • At least in sports fandom howerver, the collecting aspect is a predominant form of fandom activity. Thom Lovero wrote about jerseys as a symbol of fandom. "The jersey has become the flag of sports -- the most powerful symbol of the connection between fans and their teams. 'You can’t do any more than wear a player’s number on your back to show that connection,' said Merrill Melnick, a retired sports sociologist at SUNY Brockport who specialized in studying fan behavior." But when things go sour, the jersey takes the brunt of fan anger. "'When the athlete does something to let them down, they can’t take them to court, so symbolically they burn a jersey,' Wann said. 'It’s like someone throwing a ring back in the face, as publicly as they could possibly cut off the ties to the athlete.'"

    What fan history stories do you know of? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Recognizing women

    Claudia Rebaza - Niedziela, 18 sierpnia 2013 - 5:52pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    One foregrounded female shape, a box maze, and numerous small male outlines

    • San Diego Comic-Con appeared to be yet another opportunity for some members of the media to notice that female fans exist in large numbers. The Mary Sue discussed a study showing that women dominated conversations about Comic-Con. "Proving once again that women can in fact be nerds, Networked Insights has analyzed the social media discussion of Comic-Con, and has determined that women are in the majority when it comes to discussing the event. Based on 3.5 million social media conversations, it appears that 54% of the people talking about SDCC related T.V. shows, actors, movies, comics, and other relevant topics were women."
    • Forbes provided anecdotal evidence of the same. "Heading to Comic-Con, I expected the massive convention crowd to be heavily male. After all, we’re told again and again that young male teens are the main demographic for these movies. Hollywood puts almost no effort into attracting women or young girls to their biggest blockbusters so why should very many girls make the expensive pilgrimage to San Diego? Instead, the place was swarming with women. It almost seemed like there were more women then men." The conclusion? "There’s a huge untapped market out there for female superheroes."
    • Of course when commercial works are targeted at women, it isn't always what one would hope. Starmometer posted about The K-Pop Star and I, which is described as "fan fiction from Lifebooks...a romantic novel that involves two different cultures" and appears to be a self-insert story for music fangirls.

    What sorts of things do you think the media misunderstands about fans? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fan conventions

    Claudia Rebaza - Piątek, 16 sierpnia 2013 - 8:47pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Image by Robyn of gathered people with text reading Meetups Large and Small

    • SB Nation published a somewhat bemused summary of a day at MLB Fanfest but concluded that "The Real Baseball Thing has something to do with the act of playing baseball and something to do with the cumulative experience of watching it over a lifetime, and it's easy to sense its presence and see its effect. It manifests as a slow, blissed-out trancefulness, and it -- and not the sepia tones or the synergy -- is what still fills stadiums and domes. The chance to commune with it is what led volunteers to spend day-long shifts feeding pitching machines and encouraging strangers. It was the only reason anyone was at the Javits Center in the first place, and why the game -- alternately shrunken and puffed-up as it can seem -- can still fill six blocks with excited people."
    • Henshin Justice wrote about the growth of Tokusatsu fandom as seen at Anime Expo. "Power Morphicon is still in its infancy and focused on tokusatsu’s American counterpart; and G-Fest, the largest Godzilla / Japanese monster convention, is far away in the Midwest. Therefore, as the largest North American convention geared specifically toward Japanese animation and entertainment, Anime Expo becomes the big summer convention for most West Coast-based toku fans to meet and geek." This can be a mixed experience since no fandom is completely harmonious. "[T]okusatsu cosplayers aren’t exempt from harsh, unnecessary criticisms. John noted other toku fans who approached him and questioned his cosplay and criticized him for even liking anything related to the Kamen Rider Hibiki series."
    • Fan conventions are also the subject of documentaries, such as Fantasm, a horror convention documentary that "explores the bonds formed by the close-knit community of fans who attend horror conventions."
    • Get-togethers don't always have to be on such a large scale though, and animator Leigh Lahav created the short video "Fangirls" as a gentle poke at the trials and tribulations of female fandoms.

    What fan convention stories do you have? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Knowing your rights

    Claudia Rebaza - Środa, 14 sierpnia 2013 - 4:50pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Banner by Bremo reading This Image Has Been Removed for Copyright Reason

    • Microsoft has been in the news for its copyright decisions in the past few months. Shogun Gamer had a discussion about Microsoft's retraction of a DRM decision that would have limited game buyers' rights to share games and would have required people to be connected online daily, which also restricted who could use the content. Perhaps the earlier controversy informed their second decision to open up the X-box to development. "[T]he company is doing away with its unpopular publishing restrictions, opening the door for independent developers to create and release their own games on Xbox One without enlisting the aid of a publishing partner. That essentially turns every Xbox One owner -- from well known developers to your average Joe -- into a potential Xbox One game maker."
    • At PBS' Mediashift, Patricia Aufderheide discussed the case of a music copyright incident and its troubling outcome. "Baio warns fellow remixers everywhere that “fair use will not save you,” and “nothing you have ever made is fair use.” Whoa. Neither of these statements is true. Fair use is riding high in the courts. The fair uses of "Jersey Boys," who used clips from "The Ed Sullivan Show," were forcefully vindicated just a few weeks ago, and the litigious rightsholders were ordered to pay the defendants’ costs and fees. Georgia State University successfully defended a copyright lawsuit brought by greedy publishers, and got a court order for the publishers to pay over $3 million in attorneys’ fees and costs."
    • It's easy, however, to find cases of companies taking questionable actions, such as the movie subtitle fansite undertexter.se being raided by the police. The site contained user-submitted translations of movie dialog. "The copyright industry in Sweden has previously asserted threateningly that the dialog of a movie would be covered by the copyright monopoly, and that any fan translation – even for free – would be a violation of that monopoly." However, a similar case took place in Poland where "the charges were dropped and the expert opinion was that translating from hearing and sharing for free is not infringing the copyright monopoly. This is relevant as any EU court sets precedent all over the EU."

    What legal and technology stories have you seen that impact fan activities? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom spinoffs

    Claudia Rebaza - Niedziela, 11 sierpnia 2013 - 6:28pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Handcuffs, ribbon, and a key by caitie~

    • Emma Di Bernardo wrote a post for the online zine Wom*news asking Twilight Fanfiction: Can It Turn Sexism Into Feminism? "The most popular, successful and fastest growing genre in Twilight fanfiction is Alternate Universe, or AU. These fics take away what many presume to be the most enticing elements of the Twilight series...That Bella loves Edward unconditionally and forgives him for any mistakes or sexist, misogynistic, or manipulative behaviour and...Bella is super submissive and basically the character equivalent of a doormat with no personality...Fans are given the chance to rewrite parts that they didn’t like about the books, or take the essential physical traits of the characters and use the already established familial and romantic relationships to shoulder an original plot."
    • Posting at The Writer's Block blog, Lyda Morehouse also cites fixing canon as one of her three reasons for writing fanfic. "Fandom used to be a word that encompassed the entire community of fans, no matter what their individual fandoms...I find it’s a whole different kind of writing than what most professional writers are used to because there is a serious amount of instant gratification...It’s not like sending a book off to a publisher and never hearing boo from your readers. I get feedback chapter by chapter for my fics, and sometimes a dialogue happens between the reader and the writer—someone will say, 'Oooh, I wonder if x will happen?' and the author writes back and says, 'I never thought of that! I might use that!” and suddenly a community is writing a story.'"
    • Speaking of Twilight fanfic and fandom communities, Examiner.com wrote about the continued interaction between author and fandom. "Fifty Shades of Grey fans got a heartfelt thank you from E L James on July 7. The author made an impromptu call into Seattle WAVE radio which was devoting 3 hours of airtime to the 'greysessed' fan community. Planning to discuss fan fiction, fan art and all things 'Fifty Shades,' host Lori Ness was excited when E L James called to give a 'huge thank you' to all her loyal fans. James went on to tell prospective writers to 'write for yourself.'"

    What fanwork spinoffs have you seen in your fandoms? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanfiction around the world

    Claudia Rebaza - Piątek, 9 sierpnia 2013 - 5:42pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Map of the world with pictures of fandom

    • The Hindu featured an article on writer Shreya Prabhu Jindal who discussed her start in fanfic. "Most of the audience members were eager to know how Shreya, in her early twenties, managed to write a book at such a young age. Shreya, an English teacher at Vasant Valley School, began writing when she was 13. As a young girl and a budding writer, she discovered fan fiction, and ever since, has written in that genre, relatively unknown in India. 'A lot of my writing is inspired by fan fiction. I visualise stories as scenes and there are cliff hangers in my stories.'"
    • The National of the United Arab Emirates wrote about Kindle Worlds. "[P]ushed to its logical conclusions, it has potentially major implications for the way the creative industries work, and, indeed, for what we mean by 'fiction'. As fan fiction comes into the mainstream, it’s possible to envision a future in which popular novels become only the first instalment in an ecosystem of further stories. And over time, will the great distinction we maintain now between the original work and the fan fiction simply fade away? Currently, our idea of the creative process, and of 'art', is tightly wound up with the idea of a single author – this is the idea of the creative genius, given to us by the 19th-century romantics – but in this networked age, perhaps that conception of art is finally losing relevance. Instead, we may come to see art as the aggregated efforts of a number of networked people: a creation of the global brain, not a solitary author."
    • Malaysia's The Star Online had two features on fanworks. One focused on online RPGs. "Nurhanani Fazlur Rahman, 19, prefers the unique collaborative effort involved in 'role-play fanfic'. And she doesn’t do her writing on forum boards like most of the others in the genre – she does it on Tumblr, as part of a community of about 30 authors from around the world. In fact, Nurhanani – or Nani, as her friends call her – has five separate Tumblr blogs, each dedicated to a character from the A Song Of Fire And Ice series."
    • The other feature focused on fanfiction's evolution. "Known simply as fanfic, this genre of storytelling has actually been around for quite some time. Some even say Charlotte Brontë and her siblings pioneered it when they started writing fantasy adventures based on Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington – an actual person. In today’s world, that’s known as real-person fanfic – very popular among One Direction and Kpop fans. And in the 70s, of course, we had the Star Trek-based Spockanalia fanzine, which was basically filled with fanfic. But thanks to the Internet, e-books and tablet devices, fanfic has really started to grow like crazy in recent years, including in Malaysia."

    What stories have you seen about fanworks in your country? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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