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  • OTW Fannews: Music fans in the limelight

    .Stephanie Chrystal - Piątek, 27 września 2013 - 7:05pm
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    Banner by Robyn of a singer in a spotlight with the post title 'Music Fans in Limelight'

    • The Jakarta Globe wrote about tribute performers in K-Pop fandom. "One group of Indonesian K-Pop converts have captured media attention through their unique display of fandom. The nine boys, aged between 14 and 23 years old, formed Boys’ Generation Indonesia, and have gained a cult following for their explosive Girls’ Generation tribute dance and song numbers." Although the fan group has been successful they haven't always been well received. “'Some people — boys, mostly — react unpleasantly towards what we do. But we accept it as another kind of support. Sometimes it hurts, but we just let it go.' Dafi added that the group does its best not to take criticism or prejudice personally, instead choosing to focus on the knowledge that what they are doing promotes Girls’ Generation to a growing fan base in Indonesia."
    • Writing about tribute performances in Chicago, WBEZ discussed bringing fans together together to build a nightlife in the city. "When creating a night that references the music, ideas, and persona of a specific artist or artists, a built-in audience is even easier to find than a standard club night. And in the case of someone like Kate Bush, it is a change to legitimize her significance with American audiences who are less likely to be recognized as major part of her fandom. 'Our primary hope is that we will reach those who adore and/or appreciate the music of Kate Bush and bring them together in a space of positivity and community,' Erbentraut said."
    • Business Insider noted how the landscape had changed since NSYNC had its heyday and looked at some examples of the fandom's activity online since that time. Citing memes, tumblrs, fanfiction and more, they concluded "[w]ith the alleged return of the popstars this weekend, remember fairweather fans: there are some who have been holding strong in the bandwagon, waiting for this moment."

    What music fandom stories do you know about? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Non-commercial revelations

    Claudia Rebaza - Środa, 25 września 2013 - 6:14pm
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    Banner by Lisa of a child figure reading a book and thinking of gold

    • The Oxford Student wrote about the boom in Night Vale fandom. "Radio drama is more than just a lost art, a piece of nostalgia left behind from days before television and the internet...With the low budget, there are no necessary expectations that the project will bring home the bacon. This leaves a wide open field for the industry to take risks with new, even first-time writers...co-creator, Joseph Fink...says in an interview...that it is the best time in history to be an artist of any kind...Monetary satisfaction aside, it has never been easier to have your creations seen, read, or heard by other people."
    • While the availability of porn within fanfiction often prevented its open discussion, its existence reveals what mainstream media hasn't provided. "The overwhelming popularity of women's erotic literature, illustrated by the recent worldwide best seller 'Fifty Shades of Grey' by EL James and the flourishing women's fan fiction community from which it emerged, proves that there is great demand among women for explicit sexual representations. Millions of female readers embraced the 'Fifty Shades of Grey' trilogy...not for its depiction of oppression, but for its exploration of erotic freedom. Female-authored erotica and pornography speaks to fantasies women actually have, fantasies that are located in a world where women must negotiate power constantly, including in their imaginations and desires."
    • Fandom gatherings have become the new way to market content that lacks visibility in the media. Writing about an author's fan con for NPR, Petra Mayer talked to Random House's PR reps about why this is. "Though Macomber sells millions, it's mostly through word of mouth. You won't find her in The New York Review of Books. Instead, women like Banas devour the books and then share them with friends and family — which is why Macomber's publisher thought a weekend-long party might be a good way to attract some mainstream media attention. 'For certain authors who have large fanbases and write certain kinds of books, maybe books that tend to be more commercial, the review coverage — or some of the space in traditional media — isn't always there.'"
    • While being "non-commercial" means that certain works will never be mainstream, it doesn't mean that mainstream outlets aren't getting a clue about how to find an audience.

    What formerly non-commercial works have you seen enter mass media? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Why is fandom important?

    .Ina - Sobota, 21 września 2013 - 5:15pm
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    OTW Fannews: Why is fandom important?

    • Writing about fandom in the Phillipines, Business World Weekender focused on its monetary value. "Foreign pop idols’ 'fan meets' are a fairly recent trend in the country. While 'fans’ days' are regularly held by local artists, only lately did foreign stars hit our shores to conduct their own 'fan service'." The article concluded "In the Philippines, fanaticism may still be a luxury. But whatever the reason -- awesome talent, psychological gratification, fulfillment of an inexplicable fantasy -- there are avid buyers. Like an expensive watch or a designer bag, the urge to spend is often irresistible -- irresistibility that will cause the fandom phenomenon to flourish."
    • Roddenberry heir, Rod, has finalized a new documentary on Star Trek fandom. Discussing Paramount's approach, he said "I feel that the powers-that-be have really lost that opportunity. I think they’ve gotten better in recent years, but I’d say for decades...they were sending cease-and-desist orders to fan websites that had photos of actors and Star Trek logos on them. That’s someone who is looking at the here-and-now and not thinking about the future. And those sorts of things went on for years and really upset me...I found boxes and boxes of personal correspondence from my father...[w]here he responded personally to fans who were sending in questions about the show. And that’s what strengthened the Roddenberry connection with them. In that we genuinely care. And the studio at that time, and not so long ago, really didn’t seem to."
    • The University of Wisconsin, Madison wrote about student Ashley Hinck's PhD research on fan activism in Harry Potter fandom. "In doing this research, I'm working against the idea that super fans are weird, crazy loners. For these fans, it is very serious and it has really important implications for who they are as political subjects, as citizens...People have always been fans of things, but organized fandom ... it's easier to hook up with other fans, too, because of the Internet. Fandom is just really motivating because it gives you a reason to connect to something, and then you can use that connection as a vehicle to get to other places...That deep connection is powerful."
    • Author J.M. Frey spoke about fandom from the inside and why it is important. "You build communities like those Archive of Our Own and Fanfiction.net, Tumblr and Deviant Art. You do good deeds in the name of the writers, actors, and shows that you love...You parlay your love into degrees, courses, conferences, academic readers, and text books. You call out work that is problematic and encourage creators to grow, to learn, to take an interest, to get better. You find things in my work that I might not have realized I put there and you play with them. It’s incredible."

    What stories do you have about why fandom is important? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: The visibility of gender

    Claudia Rebaza - Sobota, 21 września 2013 - 4:34am
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    Banner by Bremo with an eye and the post title

    • The rise in fandom visibility seems to be leading to an increasing media backlash about fans expressing themselves but women fare differently in these discussions. A particularly visible example was a BBC documentary on One Direction fandom which, despite hype focusing on fandom extremism failed to do well in the ratings. Writing about the coverage in The Conversation, academic Andy Ruddock stated "Far from being a story about poor deluded adolescents, the One Direction incident confirms that girls are major players in global media industries." Focusing on both their insight and their dismissal, he explains "Audiences use boy bands to create their own entertainment. The English group are just raw materials that teenagers fashion into cultures of emotion, identity and friendship. This is probably why Directioners are upset over the documentary: the world is poking fun at their work."
    • There has also been much discussion about fans rejecting casting choices across multiple franchises. But the tone of those discussions varies depending on who the fans might be. For example, an academic who was interviewed about fan influences doesn't discuss why there was a backlash against Ben Affleck other than to say "People who are into Batman don’t want the movies to be bad...They have a lot of emotional investment. They don’t want the character or story to be mistreated." He also concluded that to be recognized for one's fannishness by being brought aboard to market a franchise is "what every fan fantasizes about becoming."
    • Yet the arguments over Doctor Who casting involved claims that those who were upset about the choice weren't "true fans". "Undoubtedly, someone will argue that we are not the type of 'fangirl' they meant when discussing the 'inferior' fans that they’re happy to be rid of. We don’t, for instance, maintain a Tumblr of David Tennant or Matt Smith photos. But that shouldn’t matter. Everyone’s expression of enthusiasm about the thing they love should be accepted in geek culture. The Tumblr of photos is just as valid a way to express love of fandom as recitation of fandom trivia. After all, there are bound to be male fans out there who would be equally as drawn to the casting of a particularly pretty companion. And yet, their status as a 'fan' would not be similarly diminished or questioned. Enthusiasm is what makes a 'real' fan (if there is such a thing), not the particular way in which that enthusiasm is expressed."
    • Rejection of particular characters in shows has gained less attention, but at least one actor felt that the character's gender was critical. "I finally realized that most people’s hatred of Skyler had little to do with me and a lot to do with their own perception of women and wives. Because Skyler didn’t conform to a comfortable ideal of the archetypical female, she had become a kind of Rorschach test for society, a measure of our attitudes toward gender. I can’t say that I have enjoyed being the center of the storm of Skyler hate. But in the end, I’m glad that this discussion has happened, that it has taken place in public and that it has illuminated some of the dark and murky corners that we often ignore or pretend aren’t still there in our everyday lives."

    How do you see female fandoms addressed in the media? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Women's place in fandoms

    Claudia Rebaza - Wtorek, 17 września 2013 - 8:01pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Banner by Robyn of OTW with female symbol and the post title

    • The Koalition discussed how sexism is hurting gaming. "Community is a very loaded word. While it lets us gamers come together under a shared passion, it also allows us to exclude those we do not feel meet our standards of membership...one group is conspicuously left out of the conversation: the female gamer. While a female gamer could be part of some or none of these schools of thought, they are both minimized and criticized when voicing opinions. Whatever a gamer may be, one thing most can agree on is that being a girl isn’t part of it."
    • Comics writer Liz Argall suggests women should embrace being seen as a menace to fandom. "I don’t like it when incredible people I know are misrepresented, under represented, and sometimes you just have to celebrate your awesome-sauce. Cheryl Morgan was called a menace to fandom because she created the fanzine Emerald City (1995-2006), which existed in digital and well as print. How dare a science fiction fanzine use something as science fictional as the internet? It just wasn’t fair! Cheryl designed badge ribbons in emerald and gold that proudly proclaimed menace to fandom. Recent controversies have made quite a few of us want to wear a menace to fandom ribbon, given menace reflects people, issues and activism that make our communities of practice a better place to be."
    • While celebrating fangirls at San Diego Comic Con, Fangirl the blog quoted a Grantland piece that recounted how patience could be short when it came to women's voices. "I confirmed with several people sitting in the immediate vicinity that it was a young man shouting 'Women who talk too much!' after the loudspeaker asked attendees to voice their appreciation for the participants in the 'Women Who Kick Ass' panel. It’s an ugly moment, an unfortunate capper to a great session, to be followed by many of the guys sitting around me offering up tired lines like 'I hope they feel empowered now!' and several recitations of the Twilight mantra about ruining the Con. To be sure, most people in the room were respectful. But at a certain point, there needs to be an accounting for the fact that there is an ugliness that burbles beneath the surface of too many Comic-Con events."
    • By comparison, Julia Errens at The Mary Sue talked about her experience at a Harry Potter con to discuss how cons can indeed be empowering. "This vocal questioning of societal norms was endemic for LeakyCon. All discussions I partook in or witnessed across the weekend eventually touched upon gender roles within the patriarchy. Clearly there was a keen need to talk. This slice of HP fandom seems to have created a safe space to not only get creatively involved and build media criticism skills, but also explore important facets of their own personhood. Anybody who finds that chucklesome needs to sort out their priorities."

    What stories about female fans and fandoms do you know of? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Killing authors

    Claudia Rebaza - Niedziela, 15 września 2013 - 12:16am
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    Banner by Lisa of a skeleton attacking an man in a 19th century graphic

    • A post at eConsultancy placed fanworks among other examples of the 'death of the author'.“While the barriers to entry for authorship have declined, the ability to remix and distribute content has dramatically increased. The ability to publish to the web, combined with applications that allow content remixing (Adobe Premiere, Wordpress, Instagram) has meant that original authors now find themselves with significantly more challenges to their intellectual property. Remix culture can completely change narratives to the intentions of the remixer. This is most clear in the remixing of television shows into vignettes that have normally satirical intentions.”
    • The New York Times described How to Make a TV Drama in the Twitter Age. Gathering together various show runners, they spoke about how audience perception was increasingly understood as shaping the narrative. "Robert King: Sometimes there are lapses of storytelling not even in the script. But when you get to the execution, either in the editing or in the acting, a bead is lost. When you realize when 50 people on social media are misunderstanding that in the same exact way, that’s something we have to correct. Carlton Cuse: When you’re telling a story, no matter how rigorous you are with yourself and your collaborators as to the clarity and intention of the story, you’re still in a bubble. The moment that the audience becomes involved, that bubble dissolves. Perception is reality. So, however they perceive it, is actually what it is."
    • Indie Wire featured Austenland as an example of what fans have taken from Austen's works. "'Q: You were saying that girls look to Jane Austen to learn about love, and because they want to be romanced. What do you think the moral of "Austenland" is with regard to love and what to expect from love?' A: I think the moral...is 'Girls, get your crap together, because it's not real.' And that's the whole thing, reality versus fantasy. [Keri Russell's character Jane] had to figure it out herself and stand on her own two feet, and not be so dependent on this fake world, and at that point she finally can find love. Because she took it to the nth degree and she needed a reality check...to my young daughter, I will say...[g]o for the Mr. Bingley. You need to go for that sweet boy. He seemed more real, in that the girl didn't have to change him."

    What stories about changing authorship and audience do you know of? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Everyone wants the fan market

    Claudia Rebaza - Czwartek, 12 września 2013 - 4:45pm
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    Banner by Bremo of a crowd with the post title over it

    • Publisher Random House launched Suvudu Universe, a community generated content site. Writer Justin Landon explained what a bad deal it is. "Here’s how Suvudu Universe works. The content creator signs up to be a part of the program, ‘subscribing’ their RSS feed to Suvudu Universe. If the content creator wants to share it with Suvudu Universe there merely tag the post 'Suvudu'. The 'editors' review that content and assuming it meets their criteria they repost it to the Suvudu Universe feed." The rights to that work though? Not only do contributors have no right to be paid, they grant a wide range of rights to Random House in perpetuity. "What Suvudu Universe is offering is no different than the underhanded rights grab Random House attempted as part of their eBook only imprints."
    • Negotiating rights for fanwork often doesn't turn out well. "When is a fan page not a fan page? When it's a Facebook page caught in a battle between its fan creator and a corporation desperate to turn it 'official.' That's the story behind BET's attempted acquisition of a Facebook page for its series The Game. The ongoing contest between the corporation and the Facebook page's creator, Stacey Mattocks, culminated in a lawsuit...Mattocks claims the struggle for control eventually resulted in a takedown notice from the site because she wouldn't allow BET to wrest the page away from her."
    • The YouTube site Machinima "wants to raise $80 million to create an online video subscription service" further monetizing machinima content. "'The fanboy viewer is crazy, engaged and ravenous,' Machinima CEO Allen DeBevoise told Reuters in an interview. 'We intend to raise capital to be a company in the spirit of HBO and AMC, but in an over-the-top world,' he said. 'Over-the-top' refers to viewers who watch TV shows online, bypassing traditional cable or satellite services."
    • A press release on PR Web announced that LiveLuvCreate Inc Adds Fan Fiction Facility to Site. "Specialist image creation website, LiveLuvCreate Inc, is now offering its website visitors with another means of expression after adding a fan fiction section to the site. The new facility has proven extremely popular, with more than one thousand fan fiction additions being made to the site in the space of just one week."

    What fan marketing or property rights stories have you come across? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanfic and publishing models

    Claudia Rebaza - Wtorek, 10 września 2013 - 6:07pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Banner by Natasha of ink and quill pen

    • Digital Book World examined the motivations for including Kurt Vonnegut in the Kindle Worlds program and concluded that fanfiction = marketing. "The backlist works of iconic authors fundamentally need exposure and marketing. That’s how fans of one book choose to read others by the author, and how new readers discover the work. The marketing budgets of large, traditional publishers are overwhelmingly focused on their frontlist offerings, so the backlist is forced to 'sell itself.' This is not the practice of the movie, music or textbook business, but it is the practice of trade publishers."
    • OTW legal staffer Rebecca Tushnet also addressed Kindle Worlds in an article on Airship Daily. “Amazon’s doing an experiment, and the good thing about not paying advances is there's not a huge amount of overheads,” she explains. Groups like OTW are pushing back at Amazon’s exploitation of their genre. “It’s just another business model representing another way of Mechanical Turk-ization the world of literature."
    • Fast Company had an interview with Philip Patrick, director of business development and publisher of Kindle Worlds, who claimed Amazon wanted fanfic of properties that were already selling well on its site. Asked what "makes one author’s work more 'fan fic-able' than another?" he replied "Really it comes down to great storytelling, compelling characters, and vibrant geographies that writers are excited to explore. Some Worlds are more current or popular than others, of course, but there are many iconographic works and characters that Kindle Worlds writers are going to love, like Billy Pilgrim."
    • A writer at the Huffington Post described what may be the new reader pattern: Finished Your Favorite Book/Show? Try Fan Fiction. "Despite stereotypes to the contrary, fan fictions can be quite entertaining and of very high quality. It is not uncommon for fan fictions to be better than their source material. Continuity and fluctuations in tone are less of an issue with fan fiction than you might imagine. Consider that your favorite TV Shows are written by a large, revolving group of writers. The multiwriter nature of TV Shows makes many works of fan fiction seem perfectly at home within the rest of a series. In many cases, the only difference between a fan fiction and a canonical manifestation of a fictional universe lies in its creators' willingness to pay for official rights to the brand."

    What stories about fanfic and publishing do you know of? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Anime missing and found

    Claudia Rebaza - Sobota, 7 września 2013 - 4:54pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Anime eyes by Robyn

    • Fantastic Memes discussed how anime fandom affects Japanese language learning. "In English, we have plenty of loan words from the Japanese language – and, particularly in the English-speaking anime fandom, these words take on different meanings and connotations from how they were originally used. It does have an effect on how anime fans (as opposed to textbook users) approach learning Japanese as a second language."
    • Blogger TheBigN discussed transience in anime fandom. "[T]he incoming class of freshmen had what I’d call a sharply divided focus on how they approached anime and fan culture than what I had. While the general format of club activities stayed the same, in choosing shows, their focus was more about shows that entertained...If they didn’t get that, some people would find some other way to get their anime, as this was when fansubs became easily obtainable. And this new group expressed themselves and their fandom more openly, with more participation in some other aspects of culture (from gunpla to cosplay), as well as how they watched anime...But while it wasn’t a sea change, but[sic] the time I graduated college, it definitely felt like my “era” had passed in a way."
    • Blogger Andy Piper praised the Nine Worlds convention citing how it was "an inclusive and diverse event – and that is the standout memory of my 3 days at the con. The range of tracks, fandoms and cultures on offer and on display was outstanding and I enjoyed the opportunity to mix with all kinds of folks and make new friends from across all of them." However while the event had an Indie Comics track, manga was not mentioned in the program and there was no programming that focused on anime either, whereas 6 of the 26 different tracks were focused on roleplay or gaming. The OTW was, however, featured in the Fanfiction track where OTW staffer Lucy Pearson presented Owning the Servers: OTW and AO3 in a post-'50 Shades' world.

    What anime and manga fandom events do you know of? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Analyzing fanfiction

    Claudia Rebaza - Piątek, 30 sierpnia 2013 - 7:27pm
    Typ wiadomości:
    • The Daily Dot wrote about Tumblr user destinationtoast's analysis of fanfic on AO3, which contradicted popular belief. "Explicit stories only make up 18.1% of the total, with G-rated fic being the second most popular rating. So it’s definitely not all 50 Shades of Grey out there. In fact, if you created a fanfic from all the most popular characteristics on AO3, you’d end up with a single-chapter male/male story (M/M takes up a whopping 45.5% of all AO3 content), rated Teen and Up, between one and five thousands words long."
    • Salon reviewed elements of Newsroom fanfiction and concluded journalists would find AUs more appealing. "What’s striking, though, at a glance, is just how few of the stories mention the news. Granted, fan fiction writers tend to focus on the bodice-ripping rather than cerebral elements of their chosen entertainments...Maybe if “The Newsroom” were surgically removed from the news — if Will McAvoy were an iconoclastic lawyer or doctor or, well, president, and MacKenzie McHale his slightly out-of-her-depth co-counsel or chief of surgery or veep — it would seem in better taste. It would be possible to evaluate the relationships as existing in the context of an office, rather than focusing so intently on what about the context is so wrong."
    • Buzzfeed posted an interview with a writer of what was claimed to be the longest fanfic ever. "The Subspace Emissary’s Worlds Conquest is currently over 3,500,000 words, making it almost three times as long as Marcel Proust’s seven-volume À la recherche du temps perdu, six times as long as Infinite Jest, and thirteen times as long as Ulysses. TSEW is “based” on the Nintendo fighting game Super Smash Bros. in the same way that Proust’s novel is “based” on a bite of tea cake, and it is a monumental thing. At present, the work has 28 chapters, which are grouped into a rough structure based on 32-bit role-playing games (Disc One, Disc Two, and so on.)"
    • Numerous sites posted about the live-action version of My Immortal, which "is widely regarded as the worst piece of fan-fiction that this world has ever seen." While it's easier to determine how many words long a story is than how good it is, another question is whether or not the story is even intended as fanfic. "Aside from the nonsensical plot, readers also believe that My Immortal was trolling because of the piece's aggressive assault on grammar and the English language in general."

    What fan analysis posts do you know of? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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