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  • OTW Fannews: Fannish Psychology

    Claudia Rebaza - Niedziela, 5 lipca 2015 - 4:44pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Banner by Alice of the side of a face with the title OTW Fannews: Fannish Psychology

    • An article at the Huffington Post explored the appeal of some canon relationships. "According to DeFife, this strong desire we feel for an onscreen couple to get together is rooted in a psychological phenomenon known as the Zeigarnik Effect. 'It was named after a psychologist who observed waiters in restaurants who would not write down their orders for a table...She found that they had memory for the order only as long as it wasn't filled, and then once it was filled that memory for the order went away.' The phenomenon now refers to the notion that an unsolved problem remains cognitively alive. Unresolved romantic chemistry in TV shows and books, DeFife says, falls neatly into this category.
    • An interview in The Independent with author Lucy Saxon revealed her health's role in fanfic. "It was thought likely that glandular fever had triggered the CFS, and doctors initially thought it would clear within a year. But as time went on it became apparent this was a condition that would be with Saxon for life...she recalled how much she had enjoyed creative writing at primary school...'I had been reading a lot of Harry Potter fan fiction, I was off school a lot, and had a lot of time on my hands...I wrote fan fiction for a good two years and alongside that I started to write original stuff.'"
    • A Boing Boing post linked to I Ship It, a short film by Yulin Kuang. The work "follows a young singer named Zoe Smallman (Mary Kate Wiles of The Lizzie Bennet Diaries fame) who recovers from a breakup by turning to Harry Potter-themed 'Wizard Rock.' It’s a charming story that shows off Kuang’s visual flare, which is clearly influenced by the likes of Wes Anderson and Edgar Wright but still feels unique. And Kuang's interest in online spaces—both as a distribution platform and as subject matter—could very well place her at the forefront of an upcoming trend in filmaking."
    • An interview in Concordiensis with the writer of a fanfic inspired play asked about the motivation for the plot. "The play starts off with Eddie who, after a run in with an ultra fan, Catherine (who is also a prolific fanfiction writer) is inspired by her slash fanfiction of The Gargoyle and the Sparrow, to try to become famous again. In an effort to reclaim his fame, Eddie seeks out Frank and convinces him to pretend to be married and basically reenact Catherine’s fanfiction to cater to their fan base." The playwright explained "[F]rom Catherine’s angle, I related to her because we are both amateur writers. Plus, identity politics has always fascinated me. Like how people love categorizing you, and how that kind of clashes with how you identify yourself. And I thought superheroes served as a great gateway to that theme because they are able to hide themselves behind a fake persona that is always under the scrutiny of the public, making it easy for them to escape their true identities."

    What meta and articles have you seen exploring fannish identities and psychology? Write about those events in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Building on the Past

    Katie - Niedziela, 28 czerwca 2015 - 4:30pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Building on the past text with hourglass image

    • Although many an article speculated about the future of Mad Men's characters, it was The Washington Post who looked into what would happen to the the fandom's RPG twitter accounts. "[A]t least one Roger Sterling (@RogerSterlingNY) has no intention of quitting: 'Yeah, I’ve got tons of thoughts. Writing Roger has been a big part of my life for years now. He’ll go on, spouting wisdom and snark.' Sterling — who also tweets as one of the more active Peggy accounts (@PeggyOlsonMCWW) — plans to continue in character, noting the stellar tweets of @WillMcAvoyACN, a spot-on Twitter account based on the Jeff Daniels character from Aaron Sorkin’s HBO show, 'The Newsroom,' who regularly engages in political Twitter debates. One is tempted to believe that it’s actually the work of Sorkin himself."
    • The Guardian looked at the evolution of fanzines. “'It’s a very pop thing, a fanzine that’s just about one artist – not to make it for any other reason than that it expresses a deep interest and focus on one person,' says Chris Heath, the award-winning journalist who has written every issue of Literally. 'While you could argue that it becomes more irrelevant in the internet era, I think it also becomes maybe of more worth, because one of the great things – and great problems – about the internet is that it’s boundless. And there’s something great in opposition to that about seven inches by five inches. It’s a pure, perfect little package of one particular part of pop culture.'”
    • The World aired a piece on the constant reinvention of Sherlock Holmes, with attention to the role of fanworks. "[W]e also have an entirely different genre of Sherlock being produced almost by the minute — one created entirely by fans. 'Fan fiction is fascinating because it's being written in almost every language,' says Dundas. 'There's this incredible, sort of prismatic view of character provided by fan fiction that is something that we've never really seen before and I think is an intriguing new direction for how a character could evolve through popular culture.'"(No transcript available)
    • The Daily Mail featured the Finnish fans behind Fangirl Quest, a global sceneframes project. Various images were included of their iPads aligned with backdrops featuring famous characters from famous TV and movie canons. Clearly the Daily Mail lacked any fans of its own working on the article, however, as they captioned a photo of Kirk and Spock walking near the Golden Gate bridge as a "Star Wars scene in San Francisco."

    What parts of fandom seem eternal to you? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Securing a Place

    Janita Burgess - Środa, 10 czerwca 2015 - 4:26pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Banner by Sidhrat in black white and red with an image of a padlock and the text OTW Fannews Securing a Place

    • Rocket News 24 posted about a fan anime film launched after a year of work. "YouTube user azuresakuga is a non-Japanese otaku with a passion for animating. He’s spent the last year working on a short animation of his own, combining all of his favorite anime characters into one all-star marathon. Ever since he shared it with the world, Japanese otaku have been praising it all over, and once you see it too, you’ll probably do the same."
    • Bleeding Cool wrote about the Machinima Event in NYC. "Chief Revenue Officer, Jamie Weissenborn took the stage to talk about who the 'audience' is for Machinima, and described them as being ethnically diverse, 'slightly more male' and having a 'higher household median income' than many other networks. He shared that Machinima content has a 97% 'like' rating, and used the example of the Halo: Nightfall launch featuring a fan art contest which went into 'overdrive' in page impressions. Crossing DC Entertainment with Machinima, Geoff Johns was introduced by video to talk about The Hero Project from DC. This is a new competition that will bring contestants to 'secure a place' in the DC Universe with props, and visual effects provided for them to make their own shows, it seems. The goal is to produce a 'live-action short video based on their own interpretations of characters from DC Comics’ Starman comic book series'."
    • Disney's Star Wars site interviewed art teacher George Folz, the creator of 'Darth Days'. "I’d been drawing almost exclusively with a pen for a couple of years, and something about creating ink drawings of him with a fat brush was just pure bliss. As comics are my bag, and I was looking for a personal project outside of The Roman Nose, I got the idea that I’d recreate a Darth Vader scene from the original trilogy every day of 2015."
    • A post at Union and Blue speculated on Fandom: Why Do We Care About This Nonsense?. "Many of us grew up with sports, like a one sided long distance family member, who is always there but our interaction is minimal. And when we finally get that in person experience, it evolves like a vacation far more magical than anything we feel past our teenage years. We love, we love, we care, we root...But there’s always a buffer...It’s that safe distance of caring and admiration that makes sports the ultimate getaway. You can still engage, you can still care, but even at it’s darkest days, it doesn’t devastate you the way life can."

    What amazing fanwork have you seen recently? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Fannews: It's the Little Things

    Ellorgast - Poniedziałek, 8 czerwca 2015 - 5:18pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    OTW Fannews: It's the Little Things

    • At Huffington Post, The Flash actress Candice Patton was happy to hear about fanfic about her character. "There's Iris fan fiction? That's news to me. I try to stay off the parts of the internet which pertain to me or my character to a large degree. But, I think fan fiction is a great way for people to express themselves and storylines they want to see. I think it's a wonderful creative outlet! I believe I wrote / read some fan fiction when I was a teenager. It was fun!"
    • Smart Bitches, Trashy Books ran a feature on The Romance Reader’s Guide to the Marvel Cinematic Universe which did not overlook fanfic. "If you like erotica and/or m/m: Fanfic. Oh God. SO MUCH FANFIC. We can safely guarantee that wherever your desires lie, there is fanfic about it. Some fan fic is totally non-erotic in nature – here’s a link to my fav purely SFW piece, “Steve and Natasha Go to Ikea”. Some of it is torrid beyond belief. A lot of it is m/m, so until we get a gay MCU universe character, Science Bros (among others), will have to tide you over if m/m is your thing."
    • At Collider, Anna Kendrick discussed the femslash aspects of Pitch Perfect and also her disappointment that not all of it is torrid beyond belief. "I’m not gonna lie to you, I tried to read one fanfiction because I was like, ‘I have to know’ and I was… maybe I chose the wrong fanfiction to read, but it was so slow. I was expecting it to be like, ‘Oh my God! I can’t believe they’re writing this crazy shit about me and Brittany [Snow]’ but there was a lot of exposition and I was like, ‘This isn’t a [Charles] Dickens novel’ so I gave up on it after that."
    • The Roanoke Times' introduction to its new crime reporter demonstrated that even professional bios might discuss fanfic. "Interesting fact about you that few know: I used to write fan fiction – mostly Teen Titans and X-men related novellas. I recently made the (probably unwise) decision to return to fan fiction, this time spurred by the Faustian anime series Puella Magi Madoka Magica."

    Where are all the places you're seeing discussion about fanfic taking place? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: At All Different Angles

    Sarah Remy - Czwartek, 28 maja 2015 - 4:27pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Fannews banner green chalkboard with pencil and white arrows plus OTW Fannews in red letters

    • A webinar presentation on Open Learning in Fan Fiction Communities was held at the Connected Learning site. Presented by several scholars from The University of Washington Information School, it discussed various aspects of fanfic communities, including a term they developed called 'distributed affect' which described "emotional experiences [that] could also be embodied outside a group and led to significant increases in collaborative creativity." (No transcript available).
    • The Education Institute is also holding a webinar, this one for librarians, titled From Marvel to Middle-Earth: Fanfiction in the Library. The session expected to cover various topics including "background on the various technologies and fan-centred services—such as LiveJournal, Fanfiction.com, Archive of Our Own (AO3), and Amazon Worlds—that have grown up around the movement and how they are used. Participants will also learn how they can be incorporated into a library setting and adapted for programs" as well as "advice on how to incorporate and lead fan-driven creative programming at the library that is exciting, collaborative, and instructional. This includes suggestions for how to structure meetings, encourage participation and creativity in young writers, and provide opportunities to grow and refine literacy skills such as writing and engaging with texts in a constructive way."
    • The University of East Anglia in Norwich held an academic conference on Frozen in May. "The one-day event, or "Symfrozium", on May 12 will be the first day of academia dedicated to Disney's film" and covered "feminism, the film's music, reworking of fairy tales and the role of love, and whether Frozen can be considered a part of the 'Nordic Noir' genre which includes Stieg Larsson’s altogether darker Millennium book trilogy."
    • Stamford, Connecticut's Daily Voice reported on a fandom storytelling event that encouraged participants to show and tell their stories of fandom. "The collaborative storytelling event's theme of fandom was inspired by Jeremy Deller's 'Our Hobby Is Depeche Mode.' Deller's feature-length video piece shows Depeche Mode fans from all over the world and is currently on view in the group exhibition 'It's gonna take a lotta love.'"

    What are your favorite fan studies works about fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Celebrations of All Kinds

    Claudia Rebaza - Czwartek, 14 maja 2015 - 6:27pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Banner by Alice of a laurel wreath and title 'Celebrations of All Kinds'

    • The Chicago Tribune reviewed the play Badfic Love. "Here's what works: all of the fanfic scenes with Connor Konz as Harry and Jake Szczepaniak as a delightfully dumb Draco. You root for these crazy kids, despite the (intentionally) terrible dialogue they're saddled with. It's legitimately funny stuff, mostly thanks to Szczepaniak, who gets the most out every slyly stupid line he's given...The story's creator is winningly played by Cristiana Barbatelli as a confident upstart who can't fully hide her insecurities. The pair meet under false pretenses and fall for each other, and this is where playwright Pasen folds in some noted jabs at the stale, unrealistic conventions of romantic comedy."
    • The BBC reported on a 5 year plan to mark the bicentenaries of the births of the Bronte siblings. In addition to touring exhibitions, a knitted Jane Eyre, and a collection of short stories, "[t]he society said its president Bonnie Greer was 'developing an award named after Patrick Bronte"...and was also working on an initiative with Bradford Council to commemorate Branwell Bronte. The playwright was also making a short promotional film with the museum to 'invite people to come to Haworth during the bicentenary celebrations' and planning a 'Jane Eyre fan fiction" workshop in London."
    • Forbes covered the Star Wars Celebration in Anaheim and attempted to predict the future of its fandom. "Even in a fantasy universe, the lines between fact and fiction are hotly disputed. That’s a good thing. A year ago, Disney decreed that much of the so-called Star Wars expanded universe was, in essence, fan fiction...That didn’t sit well with some die-hard fans, many of whom had become pseudo-history professors of the deepest reaches of Star Wars mythology...Yet even on Wookieepedia, the site home to over 120,000 pages of fan-generated content—much of it concerning storylines now relegated to Legends status—the response hasn’t been negative, at least in terms of engagement. Says Brandon Rhea, a full-time community manager at Wikia, Wookieepedia’s parent company: 'The pageviews in general shot up.'”
    • CBC News took note of the reaction to actor Jonathan Crombie's death. "Plenty of women who were in their adolescence during the late 1980's have indeed been mourning the loss of the handsome man who portrayed Gilbert Blythe on screen — but they're far from alone. It would appear as though, just like the wider Anne of Green Gables franchise, Crombie has continued to rack up new fans from all over the world since the final film aired on CBC TV in 2000...Here are just a few of the ways that fans have been paid tribute to Anne Shirley's 'perfect boyfriend' on Tumblr, on their own blogs and through romantic fan fiction over the years."

    What different kinds of fandom celebration have you seen? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: About and By

    thatwasjustadream - Niedziela, 10 maja 2015 - 3:49pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Banner with the words OTW fannews and the OTW logo along with lines suggesting an envelope and rows of text on a computer screen

    • Arab Times reported on a new comedy, Ana Maria in Novela Land which features a bodyswapping heroine. "Ana Maria [is] an under-achieving twentysomething who spends far too much time focused on the soap. Between live-tweeting the telenovela while it airs, writing fan fiction featuring its lead characters, and spending almost every waking moment mulling over new plot developments, Ana Maria has little time for anything else." They conclude that the show's "sporadic tweaking of telenovelas and the fans who love them is often quite clever."
    • Caped Crusades featured the fan art of Brazilian artist Rick Celis involving Batman and DC villains. Included were Gotham’s female villains as the Powerpuff Girls, and an Abbey Road take on the Joker.
    • The Hollywood Reporter was one of many sources linking to a Harry Potter parody video with original footage set to the song "Uptown Funk." Created by a group of university students, its quick success may stem in part from J.K. Rowling tweeting that she'd enjoyed it.
    • Dork Side of the Force featured the anime style fanfilm 'TIE Fighter'. "Seriously, the amount of detail in this video is astounding. Some of this stuff, like the detailed interiors of the Star Destroyer and TIE fighters, we’ve never even seen in the films before. And it all looks seamless, even in anime style."
    • A project called OTP The Show has dubbed itself "A new web series about friendship - and smutty Hobbit fan fiction." A trailer is currently available and the first of three episodes will be debuting in April.

    What are your favorite fanworks or works about fans? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Events Calendar for May 2015

    Jennifer Rose Hale - Czwartek, 30 kwietnia 2015 - 12:55pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Banner by caitie of curtains opening to show a stage with the words OTW Events Calendar

    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup for the month of May! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Conferences, Fan Events and Fests, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • May the Fourth (also known as May 4 on the calendar and Star Wars Day in fandom) has become an unofficial Star Wars holiday. As StarWars.com explains, "Say 'May the 4th Be With You' out loud and you’ll hear the pun that Star Wars fans worldwide have turned into a rallying cry to proclaim their love of the saga. It’s the worldwide day to say 'May the Force be with you' to all, and celebrate the beloved Star Wars story that binds our galaxy together." Learn more about Star Wars Day on Fanlore!
    • The Queers and Comics Conference, May 7-8 in New York City, brings LGBTQ cartoonists, comics writers, and artists together with scholars and fans in order to document the history and significance of queer comics. It spotlights the veterans of LGBTQ cartooning in North America and internationally, with forums for working artists to share their knowledge and to discuss how to navigate the comics industry.
    • Miracle Day 2 is a three-day convention celebrating Torchwood. May 8-10 in London, this event will enable fans to meet a selection of the cast and crew of this series as well as create a fantastic social environment for fans of the show. Special guests include John Barrowman, Eve Myles, James Marsters, Naoko Mori, Gareth David Lloyd, Kai Owen, and Owen Teale.
    • FedCon is four full days of "star guests, autographs, photo sessions, lectures, workshops, like-minded people, fans in costumes, activities, parties, merchandise, four days filled with fun." Guests include Sean Young, James Callis (Battlestar Galactica), Tony Todd, and more. The convention is May 21-24 in Dusseldorf, Germany.
    • Billed as "Utah's longest-running general science fiction, fantasy, and horror convention," CONduit features a variety of panels, dealers' room, art show, and numerous contests (including costuming, PSA/trailer, short story, poetry, and "Binary VS. Ewokese"). Guests of honor include Jane Lindskold, author of the Athanor series and Firekeeper Saga; Larry "Dr. Trek" Nemecek; and artist Jessica Douglas. The event is May 22-24 in Salt Lake City, Utah.
    • It's the 10-year anniversary of TimeGate, an annual sci-fi convention in Atlanta that focuses on Doctor Who and British media and culture. This year's guests include actors Michelle Gomez and Katy Manning, props maker Nick Robatto, and science advisor Kevin R. Grazier. The con is May 22-24 in Atlanta, Georgia.
    • Running since 1977, WisCon bills itself as "the world's leading feminist science fiction convention. WisCon, May 22-25 in Madison, Wisconsin, encourages discussion and debate of ideas relating to feminism, gender, race and class. WisCon welcomes writers, editors and artists whose work explores these themes as well as their many fans. We have panel discussions, academic presentations, and readings as well as many other uncategorizable events. WisCon is "primarily a book-oriented convention... with an irrepressible sense of humor."
    • Northwest Fan Fest, May 29-31 in Vancouver, British Columbia, is an annual "celebration of fandom" supported by the West Coast Fan Society. Events include both adult and kid costume contests, a special fandom-related screening by Spike and Mike's Festival of Animation, console and tabletop gaming, and a 19-and-over after-hours party. Special guests include director Uwe Boll, animator Tom Cook, and actor Beverley Elliott (Once Upon a Time and Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants).
    • Sinpozium is a Sydney slash gathering that's been held eight times previously (2000-2002, 2005, 2011-2014). It is a fan-run, not-for-profit, weekend-long party. Sinpozium 2015 will be held on May 30-31.

    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

  • OTW Fannews: It's Tough Being a Fan

    Janita Burgess - Niedziela, 26 kwietnia 2015 - 5:11pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    OTWFannews banner depicting several blank trophies and medals, with the words It's Tough Being a Fan

    • Esquire said a few words about the influence of Twin Peaks on current fandom. "Of course, binge-viewing with a second screen handy for reviewing fan-generated metatextual analysis is pretty much how people watch puzzle shows like Lost, Game of Thrones, True Detective, and Orphan Black these days. What they show you is fascinating, but the creators know that it's what they cunningly refuse to show you that turns normal viewers into lunatics who'll spend hours reading differing theories about Jon Snow's parentage. They understand that as with Twin Peaks, some of the most pleasurable parts about following the series involve what happens off the screen and in the mind of the viewer."
    • An article in Do Savannah revealed how different those minds could be, however. Asked about their Bob Dylan fandom, various fans in the Georgia city disagreed as to what they found most difficult about it. Responses ranged from other fans, people who didn't like Dylan, to the performer's own behavior. However one summed up with a poignant observation. "No one really wants their heroes to die. You hope they never will. Forever linked familiar strangers on parallel railroad tracks. It’s hard watching him get older, because he’s always been with me spiritually. But then, I guess he always will be."
    • Various articles about the latest fights over the Hugo Award nominations would agree with the 'other fans' complaint. As stated by Rob Salkowitz at ICv2: "Of course, the backlash movement can’t legitimately embrace its actual objectives: the maintenance of in-group power and privilege. Instead it justifies itself according to broader principles such as the defense of traditional standards, ethics and "objective" considerations of quality divorced from the grubby political goals of opponents. Unfortunately for the high-minded ideological ring-leaders, plenty of the rank and file followers don’t get that particular memo and see the whole uprising as an opportunity to give voice to every manner of pent-up grievance, resentment and personal hang-up that they can lay at the feet of "social justice warriors" or whoever is the enemy du jour."
    • Meanwhile Wired explored the reimagining of problematic canon content in The Radicalization of Jar Jar Binks. "Granted, it’s a little jarring to insert a contemporary political allegory into the most reviled science-fiction prequel ever committed to film. In fact, Lucas came under fire for engaging in political criticism of George W. Bush...rather than tightening up the story. But Doescher has a Ph.D in ethics, and wrote his thesis on racial justice issues. And Shakespeare’s history plays—the best genre corollary for what’s going on in Phantom Of Menace—often feel intensely prescient. From that vantage point, it’s a bold but calculated risk to choose Jar Jar as the vessel for such an ideologically charged message."

    What are the difficult parts of fandom for you? Write about those issues in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: It's Your Fault

    .Lindsey D - Środa, 8 kwietnia 2015 - 4:59pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    OTWFannews banner with text It's Your Fault and a hand with a finger pointed forward

    • A post at GQ focused on a documentary about the making of a fan film tribute to another film and decided that fanworks have become too common for notice. "[T]he genre's been so co-opted by the mainstream that it's now part of the marketing playbook. Cultural gatekeepers are now enlisting us to submit our footage for their projects. Take the Ridley Scott-produced documentary Life in a Day, or EMIC, Google Play's recent collaboration with Christopher Nolan to promote Interstellar. In a weird way, people look at you funny if you're not filming something for your YouTube channel, or figuring out how to conquer Vine. These days, it's almost more audacious to say, 'No thanks—I'm just gonna be the audience.'"
    • Nintendo Life didn't get the memo, and instead wrote about a Zelda fan film. "The Zelda Project is a fan run website based in Los Angeles, California that focuses on recreating various scenes and locales from the Zelda series via photography, film, and art. Player Piano is a YouTube channel run by Filmmaker Tom Grey that primarily focuses on classically-trained musician, Sonya Belousova, recreating video game music on a piano. Both of these groups appear to be quite talented, so this fan-film could definitely be worth a watch when it's completed."
    • A number of outlets wrote about the implications of the all-female and all-male Ghostbusters remakes. Salon decided that the fault doesn't just lie with a sexist culture but that the blame also lies with fanworks. "[S]tudios are actually listening to their customers, and remakes are what you want. It’s what you’re making, after all — and by 'you' I mean the vast majority of people out in the indie fan world that supposedly serves as our alternative, our escape from the moribund studio system. What has the Internet been spending all this time making? Fan fiction, fan art, fan films. It’s hard to tell at times if the people making 'gritty reboot' trailers are parodying Hollywood or unironically creating something they want."
    • The author of Vulture's recent piece on fanfiction was interviewed by New Hampshire Public Radio, and asked if she thought there was great fanfiction available. "I found fanfiction that was ok and every once in a while something that I thought 'Oh, that's pretty good'. But I think...it's really more the writing and the reading and the sharing than the end product...Every single piece of fanfiction is like a work in progress...and it's such a sort of group experience that it's difficult to apply a term like 'great' to it. That's like saying 'Is there a great fairy tale', I mean there isn't a definitive version of any fairy tale, there's just a million different tellings." (No transcript available).

    Has the spread of fanworks reached a tipping point? Write about your evidence in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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