Movies

  • OTW Fannews: Knowing the Audience

    Janita Burgess - Poniedziałek, 15 września 2014 - 4:27pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    OTW Fannews Knowing the Audience

    • Lydia Laurenson wrote for The Atlantic about online anonymity, spurred by the change in Google+'s policy on real names. "I was finding myself on the Internet, but I was also learning skills that would be useful both as a professional and a human offline. My ability to be an effective creator was hugely shaped by writing popular fan fiction and running side-project businesses in virtual worlds. Researchers have also found pseudonymous games to be great environments for training leadership skills...Nowadays, we’re often told that The Future lies in entrepreneurship. I believe that elastic selfhood is crucial for people’s personal development, but it’s important for broader innovation, too. We need space to experiment and risk-tolerant environments where people can learn."
    • Many female fans have hidden their gender in online spaces for some of the reasons that Jen Mac Ramos describes as appearing in hockey fandom. "Plain and simple: being a hockey fan online isn't a safe space for women. In fact, it's downright frightening at times. It's no secret that hockey is notoriously a white bro sport, white as the ice they play on. The boys' club that watches and writes about it is what it is: a boys' club. It's men of all spades who get to dictate what the culture is like. While understandable on the ice (because, well, it is a boys' club in the locker room), why should it extend to how fandom should be? Why should it be around to isolate women?"
    • The media does little to value women as an audience. While suggesting that public conversations on diversity can make a difference, and reporting on problems with representation, the Hollywood Reporter nonetheless wrote about the success of female driven films as a failure of men to go to the movies.
    • At Black Girl Nerds, Jamie Broadnax questioned terms and whether or not they can encompass an entire audience of fans. "A nerd can look like anyone. They look like you or me. However, for women and people of color, are we nerds or anti-nerds? I’m not suggesting we reject the term nerd because I like being called a nerd and I have no qualms about adopting all of what is considered to be a part of nerd culture. However, as a blerd, if I choose to embrace my blerdniess as opposed to generic nerdiness than what does that mean exactly? The blerd community is a place of solidarity for nerds of color. It’s a safe place where we are free to embrace and express our unique sense of self. There is a no-judgment zone within the blerd community and we welcome blerds to cosplay as non-Black characters and for women to have a prolific voice in our community."

    What parts of fandom have you been involved in? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Working For and Against Fans

    Jennifer Rose Hale - Czwartek, 21 sierpnia 2014 - 4:46pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    People engaged in tug of war. Text reads OTW Fannews Working For and Against Fans
    • In February 2014, OTW Legal submitted comments to the European Commission in regards to its copyright regulations review. Now a report is out summing up the responses. "The results are not entirely surprising and very clear: we have a strong divide among copyright stakeholders with end users and institutional users (e.g. libraries, archives, universities) strongly in favor of copyright reform and authors, collective management organizations, publishers and producers in favor of the current copyright system."
    • Australia is undergoing a similar process, and is requesting comments from "interested organisations and individuals on the questions outlined in the discussion paper and on other possible approaches to address this issue." Submissions close on Monday, 1 September 2014. The Australian government is taking a very pro-copyright holder stance emphasizing levels of piracy and saying "Everyone has a role to play in reducing online copyright infringement. Rights holders need to ensure that content can be accessed easily and at a reasonable price. Internet service providers (ISPs) can take reasonable steps to ensure their systems are not used to infringe copyright. Consumers can do the right thing and access content lawfully."
    • Internet Policy Review featured a discussion of copyright in the UK and focused on gaming content. "Valve uses the Steam Workshop as a space where player-created content can be bought. The proceeds then get split between Valve and the item creator....[a fan] began distributing the shirts through a print on demand e-commerce service until Valve sent a takedown request. 'I was kind of under the impression that because Valve is so open to the community profiting - they've got the whole Workshop - I thought maybe they would encourage that sort of thing but they want people to do it through their channels.'...Wild was later contacted by We Love Fine, a third-party which works with Valve to get the company's approval for selling fan-designed products. A couple of his designs are now on the We Love Fine site and his work will also be included in the official shop catalogue for Valve's upcoming multimillion dollar Dota 2 professional gaming tournament."
    • ClickZ told marketers they need to embrace fan content. "This week it was reported that TripAdvisor has created a page for the Grand Budapest Hotel...While the page comes with a disclaimer...the devotion with which fans have thrown themselves into crafting unique user-generated content is very real. To date, more than 120 TripAdvisor users from all over the world have taken the time to review their fictional experience at the fictional hotel, peppering their posts with inside jokes only those who have seen the film would understand. The response demonstrates an interest in the movie that goes beyond the standard consumer reaction to entertainment content. In the literary world, this behavior is most closely related to fan fiction."

    What fandom copyright issues have you been seeing? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Perspectives on fandom

    Kiri Van Santen - Wtorek, 22 lipca 2014 - 5:05pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Banner by Diane of a cityscape

    • Chart Attack featured the feminist comedy These Aren’t the Droids. "This little comic gem is a rebel song in the plainest sense: the future was designed by teenage guys, it looks like a permanent comic-con, and that's not a future that Neko Case or Kelly Hogan (or I for that matter) really want to live in. Instead, they proffer a more humane, more feminist version of tomorrow: guns that shoot feelings! A fundamental appreciation of literacy (but fewer shades of grey)! Everbody'd have more hair!"
    • The Chicago Tribune looked at the evolution of TV recaps. "'To me, it's less critical analysis and more fandom, which is OK,' said Steve Jones, communications professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago. 'I think it's great that these sites help people get more deeply into stories and be more attentive to what (the shows) are saying. But how much of this goes beyond drilling down into particular episodes and broadens out into larger issues? If you look at the rise of popular criticism since World War II, the trajectory had been an engagement with larger social issues with relation to popular culture. I don't see recappers doing that now.'"
    • The Trades ran a review of Harry Potter fan film The Greater Good. "Overall, Justin Zagri, who wrote, directed, and edited the film, did an amazing job. His version of a scene I’m sure many Potterheads have dreamed about is spot on. He has a distinct knack for intense writing that enthralls the viewer. When the scene literally comes to fisticuffs, I hissed aloud feeling a wave of a sad sort of anger at the characters. As I mentioned earlier, the movie is 17 minutes long. I assumed I would spend the entirety checking the time and wishing for it to move along. Instead, when the credits started to roll, my jaw dropped open that it was already over! More, I demanded, of my poor Youtube app. How dare it disappoint me so!"
    • Entertainment Weekly was one of several sites promoting the new mtvU's Fandom Awards. The event will take place at San Diego Comic Con and MTV and its college network will broadcast a special on the awards on July 27. The awards consist of five categories with bracket voting being done online by fans.

    What things springing from fandom have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Legal Confusion

    Kiri Van Santen - Piątek, 18 lipca 2014 - 5:17pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    • The Washington Post was one of many media outlets covering the U.S. Trademark Office's decision to cancel the Redskins trademark registration. "The 99-page decision by the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board said the team’s name and logo are disparaging. It dilutes the Redskins’ legal protection against infringement and hinders the team’s ability to block counterfeit merchandise from entering the country. But its effect is largely symbolic. The ruling cannot stop the team from selling T-shirts, beer glasses and license-plate holders with the moniker or keep the team from trying to defend itself against others who try to profit from the logo."
    • The Wisconsin State Law Library pointed to a book about trademarks and fan-created content in the wake of the Klinger v. Conan Doyle Estate decision. The book in question is about trademarks and fan-created content from the perspective of trademark owners which doesn’t really acknowledge fans’ rights to make fair uses— but instead is about “tolerating” use. It’s an older work, and an example of the way that trademark owners used to assume that they were always the ones who got to decide how their works would be received.
    • io9 put a spotlight on a study about filk. "Women in the filk community are more likely than men to create original melodies to accompany their lyrics, while women are only somewhat more likely to borrow from others' lyrics than are men. Because filk is often viewed as an imitative culture, the tendency of women to depart from that ethos in creating their own melodies seems significant...female respondents were much more likely to define fair use as not profiting from others' work, and somewhat more likely to define it as giving credit to the original author and making private as opposed to public use of a protected work."
    • The YALSA blog posted about Fandom and Fair Use but made some problematic claims. For example, it does not actually discuss what fair use is and provides questionable examples. Crunchyroll claims to be fully licensed and even Disney has now embraced user-generated content. Instead what the YALSA post demonstrates is an example of copyright confusion: people think that some things aren’t “allowed” when in fact either fair use law or licensing is on their side.

    What confusing legal fandom issues have you come across? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Shining a Light

    Claudia Rebaza - Środa, 2 lipca 2014 - 4:03pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Banner by James of a foggy view of trees

    • OTW Fan Video & Multimedia Committee Chair Tisha Turk gave an interview on "the past, present and potential future of vidding and remix culture, and the murky status of fair use – at least when it comes to monetized remixes on YouTube" as well as her own start as a vidder. Discussing copyright claims on fanwork, she said "One possible analogy would be, if I were making a quilt out of various bolts of fabric I purchased, and I cut these pieces, and I piece them together, and add the backing, and I make this lovely quilt, and the people who made the fabrics show up and say: 'I want a cut.' Or: 'You can’t have the profit, I made the fabric, so hand it over.’"
    • The Fandom Post discussed activism around female characters in Star Wars fandom. "Were we wrong to point out our concerns about the first cast photos? Wrong to express dissatisfaction over the lack of Leia in the first wave from the Disney Store? Wrong to share our disappointment that the Star Wars Rebels announcements included the women last and their action figures won’t happen until the second wave? Perhaps if only one of those things had happened, downplaying the outbreak of concern would make sense. It’s never just one thing, though...Staying silent and hoping for the best isn’t the way to create or support change. We need to speak up each and every time."
    • A post at Teleread expressed concern at how site changes can affect writer and reader interaction. "Nobody should have to deal with that kind of abuse, thick skin or not. And it’s sad that it seems to be coming more and more common. It’s in the same vein as the writer who received rape threats for criticizing a comic book cover. How obnoxious our culture has become. We’ve seen time and again that some people use anonymity as a license to be as nasty as they possibly can. It would be great if Fanfiction.net could restore the ability for authors to block anonymous reviews altogether if they wanted. At the very least, the default for reviews after 36 hours should be rejection, not acceptance."
    • A New York Times interview with showrunner Damon Lindelof explored the long-term effects of fan reaction. "Initially, for Lindelof, this kind of fame was very attractive — he interacted eagerly with the fan base of 'Lost,' stoking their expectations and ruminations about the show’s labyrinthine plot...'The longer you tell a story, the larger the stakes have to be,' he says. 'It’s no longer satisfying to say: Are these people who crashed in this plane going to make it out O.K.? Are they going to fall in love? Are they going to live? Are they going to die? It’s like no, are they going to save the world?' In the end, they did save the world, but the way they did it left some faithful viewers unhappy. Cuse has made his peace with this; Lindelof still hasn’t."

    What aspects of fandom do you want to shine a light on? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Creations

    Kiri Van Santen - Czwartek, 19 czerwca 2014 - 5:29pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    fandom creations

    • io9 traced the history of the term 'meta'. "Today, the word meta has undergone another transformation, largely because of the intensely self-referential fandom community online... This has meant that many shows have meta episodes that are basically fan service. So meta has become a popular trope, and fans have responded by using the term meta to describe these kinds of episodes. But more importantly, fans have transformed the word meta yet again, turning it from an adjective that describes a kind of story into a noun that refers to a form of fan commentary. These days, any essay, rant, or analysis written by a fan is often dubbed 'a meta.'"
    • Gizmodo highlighted a Blade Runner Tribute Art Show which "brought some really succulent Blade Runner fanfiction along with it. On display starting at 7PM on May 31st at the Bottleneck Gallery in Williamsburg, Brooklyn Moments Lost will feature...eight unique stories based off of the Blade Runner mythos. Each story matches up with an individual original track off the CD created by Analogue Sweeden, as well as a piece artwork on display."
    • All Geek to Me began a feature about fandom tattoos. "You know you are a serious geek when you get your love for a fandom etched into your skin. Fandom Ink is all about celebrating your geek ink and most importantly, finding out the story about why you got that tattoo! We here at All Geek to Me love a good story and awesome art, thus this new column that will be featuring awesome tattoos."
    • A post at Kentucky Sports Radio encouraged readers to write fanfiction and offered some ideas. "In this issue we celebrate the 2013 Reds baseball season as we prepare for the Reds to repeat as champions! We all remember the dominance of Cueto and Chapman last postseason, as well as the heroics from Joey Votto, whose hitting with runners in scoring position was fantastic. After beating the Pirates in the WildCard Playoff (a game they just couldn’t have choked away, they never do that!) the RedLegs began their magical run to the World Series where they beat the Red Sox in six games."

    What fandom creations have stuck with you? Create some entries for them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Legal Topics

    Claudia Rebaza - Wtorek, 10 czerwca 2014 - 4:23pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Banner by Sidhrat of a pair of glasses laid on an open book

    • The Age reported on a lawsuit involving the founders of The Writers Coffee Shop. "The lawsuit asks the court to recognise that TWCS is an ongoing partnership and, as a partner, Pedroza is entitled to 25 per cent of the profits. Pedroza and Beebe are seeking...'to trap funds not yet paid by Random House'" as a result of their rights purchase for Fifty Shades of Grey. The plaintiffs claim that Amanda "Hayward, 'fraudulently' restructured TWCS under the guise of tax minimisation, without the knowledge of the partners, so payments from the Random House deal, signed in March 2012, flowed exclusively to herself."
    • A post at Screen Invasion suggested that companies using Amazon's Kindle Worlds were setting a precedent for the “potential market” factor of fair use. However, it is the pornier side of fanfiction that is likely to be unaffected. "TV’s GG can show a blush-worthy encounter between Chuck and Blair in his limo’s spacious backseat...but Kindle Worlds can reject a GG fanfic that describes a similar tryst based on the author’s word-choice. Ergo, sites featuring only blue fan-fiction do not impact the same market(s) as their un-obscene peers." This argument tracks to the case involving The Wind Done Gone, since part of that legal argument was that there was no lost revenue because Margaret Mitchell's estate would never have licensed such a work.
    • Evergreen State College's student newspaper posted an open letter from faculty about threats to academic freedom involving a parody theater piece about Disney content. "On Monday of week eight, without consulting the faculty sponsors, Dean Reece issued a written request to fundamentally alter the script, with indication that the college would prevent the students from using campus facilities to perform the script as written." The letter cited the fair use aspects of the work and their belief that a fear of legal action was behind the effort to alter the performance.
    • TIME looked at aspects of One Direction fanfiction following a high-profile fanfic book deal. "Jamison also notes that the idea of making money from fanfiction — something long seen as dubious among fans, even as recently as 50 Shades of Grey — doesn’t seem to be so strange to younger and newer fanfic writers...After all, it’s much less legally thorny to file off those serial numbers when the inspiration is reality: changing the names of a boy band doesn’t risk overstepping the fair use of someone else’s creation. And besides, it’s a time-honored tradition. As Jamison says: 'Every fiction author bases their characters on real people.'”

    What fandom-related legal issues have you heard about? Create some entries for them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fannish Histories

    Kiri Van Santen - Środa, 4 czerwca 2014 - 5:49pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    fannish histories

    • The New York Daily News was one of several media outlets reviewing a book about Bob Dylan fans. "These anecdotes are juicy enough and artfully told, but they don’t get at the heart of what makes Dylan fandom different from other kinds of fandom. The Beatles, the Ramones, Neil Young and Madonna, just to name a few, have all inspired similar obsessions. Hyperactive tape trading, for one, certainly isn’t unique to Dylan fans. Just ask any Deadhead. It’s only when Kinney turns to the Dylanologists that have devoted their lives to ferreting out the meanings behind Dylan’s music and art — rather than collecting his grandmother’s candy bowls — does he get at what makes Dylan so singularly attractive, and infuriating."
    • While quite a few sites highlight fan art, Hypable's look focused on the fan as well as the work. "I don’t think there was ever a time in my life when I didn’t spend all day watching TV. It started with Cartoon Network and as I grew up it moved on to sitcoms, crime shows, medical shows, sci-fi… I always loved making manips, I started when I was about 10 years old. I didn’t have photoshop back then so I used Paint to crop pictures and it could take a few days to crop one. Then my uncle gave me a CD with Photoshop and made my life 100 times easier and my manips 100 times better."
    • K-Drama Stars also did a fannish profile of a Nigerian fan whose homesickness was eased by fandom. "Oky thinks that American television has a lot to learn from k-dramas in terms of the way they portray romance. Less can be more when it comes to creating dramatic romantic tension. 'They can express it more PG,' she said...Watching the dramas made her more curious about Asian culture, which she knew little about when she first moved to America. Now, she is learning the Korean language and has plans to visit South Korea next year."
    • Club Jade looked at the history of women in Star Wars fandom. "I have been very lucky in that I did most of my fandom growing up in spaces that were heavily female, from the early ship-war days to Club Jade to the fanfic community. That’s not to say jerks don’t happen in such spaces – the Star Ladies invented Attack Pattern Clinique back in the days of AOL chat rooms for a reason – but for the most part I ‘grew up’ in fandom areas where women and their contributions were unquestioned, where the idea that Star Wars needs more women was simply a given."

    What's your fannish history been? Write about what you've seen on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Changing how things are done

    Claudia Rebaza - Sobota, 31 maja 2014 - 4:38pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    • PBS's Idea Channel did a piece on "The Future of Fandom" and featured discussion about fans' effects on copyright, including the stance of the OTW and the work of OTW legal staffer, Rebecca Tushnet. "In 'I'm a Lawyer, Not an Ethnographer, Jim': Textual Poachers and Fair Use, Rebecca Tushnet explains Henry Jenkins' sense that 'fans usually enjoy [an original work], but also see its flaws and gaps, which their work attempts to address and, sometimes, redress.' Fan works like Fanfic, fanvids and remixes celebrate, critique and extend beloved media, but they also exist in uncertain legal territory. They're necessarily built on copyrighted material, the owners of which are occasionally super hostile to any co-option, even loving co-option." (Transcript available)
    • While not directly connected to fandom, a recent court ruling raised concerns about what can be published about people online. NPR's All Things Considered discussed the potential changes. "Usually, the content that we talk about with the right to be forgotten is much more salacious. This guy wanted an old debt to be removed from his Google search results. He took his complaint to the Spanish Data Protection Agency, who determined that he did have a case for the right to be forgotten. And the agency ordered Google to remove links to that content. It moved through the courts as Google appealed it and the case that came down was shocking, I think, for most people."
    • Another court ruling included discussion about fan sites and works more specifically. The Supreme Court ruled on the case of Petrella v. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, a case in which the owner of a screenplay alleged copyright infringement. In her opinion, Justice Ginsburg stated the following: "[T]here is nothing untoward about waiting to see whether an infringer’s exploitation undercuts the value of the copyrighted work, has no effect on the original work, or even complements it. Fan sites prompted by a book or film, for example, may benefit the copyright owner. See Wu, Tolerated Use, 31 Colum. J. L. & Arts 617, 619–620 (2008). Even if an infringement is harmful, the harm may be too small to justify the cost of litigation."
    • While some think that fanfiction should be licensed in the future, the Deseret News wrote about Lucasfilm's decision to wipe out earlier canon, turning it into licensed fanfic. "Lucasfilm announced the Star Wars Story Group in January, which was created specifically to sift through the plethora of Expanded Universe content and decide what was and wasn’t canon, according to BleedingCool.com. The answer? Apparently none of it was. But it’s not all bad news for Expanded Universe fans...Instead, it will be rebranded as 'Star Wars Legends' and continue to be published and made available to fans."

    What examples of fans' changing things have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom and food

    Claudia Rebaza - Sobota, 24 maja 2014 - 3:27pm
    Typ wiadomości:

    Banner by Ania of the edge of a food plate

    • Singapore Showbiz wrote about the rise of TV-themed dinners surrounding fandoms with a strong focus on food. "Passionate fans have even taken it upon themselves to create a Game of Thrones' cookbook...with recipes for the dishes described in the series." The group featured has "plans for more TV- themed dinners, with plans for 'The Hunger Games', 'Downton Abbey', and 'Hannibal' dinners in the works."
    • As an article on KDrama Stars points out, fan meetings with or without food are hardly new. The Korean Drama Group started as a yahoo group in 2003 and has been meeting annually. Its fans discussed how their interest branched out from TV shows. "Some of the group's members have been inspired to learn more about Korean culture. Some take language and Korean cooking lessons. Some members of the group traveled to Korea on the k-drama tour inspired by 'Winter Sonata.'"
    • Eating celebrations can be city-wide as shown in this article by Colorado Public Radio on Star Wars themed events in Denver. "The vegetarian restaurant City O’ City and its adjoining live art space Deer Pile are hosting their third annual 'May the Fourth Be With You' party. This year, Mutiny Information Cafe, 3 Kings Tavern and City Hall have joined the roster of venues participating in the interplanetary festivities, helping spread the 'Star Wars' fandom from South Broadway through Capitol Hill."
    • MomClick featured one fan who connected with actor/writer B.J. Novak through food. "Known for his role as the intern on the popular NBC sitcom 'The Office,' he was also one of the writers for the series...In honor of Novak's book...Jen's sugar cookies were shaped and decorated around a theme of one of [his] stories, 'From the story about a red shirt, a mirror the size of Earth, to a story about what happened when the tortoise rematched the hare...I tried to get as creative as possible and to add a little bit more showmanship. They were delivered in a box decorated as the book jacket.'”

    What examples of fandom and food have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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