Vidding

  • How to Get and Use an Advanced User Account at Critical Commons

    Kristen Murphy - Wtorek, 20 września 2011 - 3:30pm
    Typ wiadomości::
    Tagi:

    Critical Commons is a non-profit advocacy coalition that supports the use of media for a variety of scholarly, educational, and creative purposes. It describes itself as "a showcase for innovative forms of electronic scholarship and creative production that are transformative, culturally enriching and both legally and ethically defensible," and its founders say their showcase explicitly includes transformative works like vids and other forms of fan video. In fact, the site specifically invites the work of remixers of all kinds.

    While getting and using an account at Critical Commons is a little more complicated than using YouTube or most other commercial services, the site's nonprofit status and explicit commitment to fair use may make it an attractive option for some fans. It is also worth noting that in addition to allowing users to stream and embed video, the site also allows users to download videos in their original resolution and quality.

    As you'll see from the instructions below, all uploaded videos must have some commentary attached to them to fulfill the site's mission of "display[ing] media that is placed in a critical context that transforms and recontextualizes the media, adding value and significance to the original work." This can be your typical vidders notes section, or it can be something as simple as "This fan video is a transformative work." (See, for example, lamardeuse's Sherlock vid, Not Responsible.)

    Create an Account for Vidding

    1. On the Critical Commons homepage, click “register” in the top right of the menu bar. Or, go directly to the registration form. You must first create a Basic User account before you can be upgraded to Advanced User status, at which point you can upload vids.
    2. “Full Name” is what name will appear on the site profile that viewers will see. This can be your vidding handle. “Username” is for your login purposes. “Institutional Email” can be your regular email address; this will appear visibly on your profile. (Remember, this site is geared toward academics, who often use more identifying information than vidders.)
    3. Once your account is created, login and click Edit Profile. You need to add further information (upgrading your status) before you can upload vids. All fields are mandatory (except Location) to reach Advanced User status.
      1. “Title” can be something like “vidder.”
      2. If you have an "institutional" affiliation, enter it here. If you are an independent creator, fan, non-affiliated scholar, etc. you can indicate this here. Some vidders may want to affiliate themselves with the Organization for Transformative Works.
      3. If you don't have a URL where Critical Commons can verify your identity (even a blog or publicly viewable Facebook page will do), CC recommends creating an account at the Archive of Our Own.
    4. Save your information at the bottom. If you have addressed all fields in your profile, you should now have a link on your profile that says “Apply for Advanced User Status." When clicked, this generates a message to the site administrator. Advanced user requests are processed manually after verifying your identity. This usually happens very quickly (within 10 minutes of when your request is received). Then, log back in and return to your profile to start uploading vids.

    Upload a vid

    Every vid you upload must have an attached commentary (either text or audio, even just brief notes are fine). Your vid will not be visible until the commentary is attached. You will upload your vid first, create your commentary, then link them.

    1. On your profile page, select Upload a Clip. Enter the vid’s title and browse for your file. There is a 300MB limit. (You can upload multiple files, but this should be used if you are attaching the same commentary to all files, which as a vidder, you probably won’t be. Therefore, it is recommended to do one vid at a time.) The upload bar will appear, but you must click "Start File Upload" to initiate uploading. When completed, click "Next" to move to Step 2.
    2. Enter a summary line for the vid (i.e. a one-line blurb) and rate its quality (probably “high”). If possible, select a thumbnail image to represent the clip; this could be a 100x100 icon used for a LJ/DW post. This image will appear on the embed screen before viewers press play.
    3. Enter vid info: “Creator” is the vidder, “Distributor” can be left blank, “Name of the Film” is the source footage, and “Year Produced” can be either the date of the source or the date of the vid, as you wish.
    4. You can add keyword tags (one per line) that help you and others to identify your vid in the database. Tags can be “vid” or “vidding” if you like, or more specific. Click Next to go to Step 3.
    5. Every vid must have a commentary of some length. To add a new commentary, select "Create a text commentary for this clip" (for instructions on adding an audio commentary see separate section below). This takes you to the "Edit Text Commentary" page.
      1. “Commentary Title” can be the name of the vid, or something like Vid Notes.
      2. Enter any tags (this will add to the list from before)
      3. The “Commentary Summary” line can be left blank, or you can repeat your blurb. This will appear as part of the text you enter later.
      4. Select your mode of text before entering your commentary.
        • Plain Text will have no line breaks or formatting.
        • Structured Text can have line breaks but no formatting.
        • HTML can have tags for both line breaks and formatting (if you know html code.)
        • Do NOT select Microsoft Word.
      5. You can copy/paste a commentary from a vid release or type your notes. If your commentary is a text file, you can instead upload that.
      6. Leave the copyright license as “Site Default.”
    6. Next, to attach the commentary to your vid, click inside the text box under “Clips” at the very bottom of the screen. You can type the name of your vid, but a list of files should appear automatically when you click in the box. The most recently uploaded file should appear at the top of the list. Click its name to select it.
    7. Save and review your commentary on the next screen. You cannot make changes here. When finished, click your username on the top right of the menu bar to go back to your profile.

    View/Edit your Published Vid

    1. In your profile, the default view is to list “Your Clips,” which is a list of your vid files. You can click on any vid title to go to its viewing page. To edit the vid’s tech details, click “edit” on your profile next to the vid’s name. Note: If any vid is listed as “private” (i.e. not “published”), then it does not have a linked commentary and is therefore not visible to the public. See steps above for linking commentaries to vids.
    2. To edit a text commentary, first use the drop-down menu to select “Your Commentaries.” This will pull up a list of your commentaries. Click “edit” next to the name to go to the edit screen. After editing, you will be able to see the updated commentary itself. To see it on the vid viewing page, click on the vid name at the bottom under “Related Clips,” or just go back to your profile and click on the vid’s name.

    Audio Commentaries

    Critical Commons also allows you to add audio commentaries. To do this, you have to record an audio commentary on your computer and upload it as an MP3 file then link it to a clip the same way you link text commentaries. This can also be done via the mobile site using the voice memo feature in most smart phones.

    Viewers can then play the clip either with or without the audio commentary. Here is a sample clip that has both audio and text commentaries: Blade Runner 3D photo scene

  • How to Cite Fan Works In Academic Contexts

    Kristen Murphy - Wtorek, 20 września 2011 - 3:27pm
    Typ wiadomości::
    Tagi:

    This style guide was developed by Karen Hellekson, editor of Transformative Works and Cultures.

    NOTE

    General Information

    This style is designed as a guideline only, and users should modify freely to fit their discipline and context. This guide provides bibliographic information that will help readers find a fan-created artwork. Some information that is usually provided in bibliographic contexts is not relevant and may be omitted. For example, fanzine presses often do not identify the city or the state, and thus they may simply be left off.

    This style is designed to be lifted wholesale and placed elsewhere, so it provides context outside the fan world. If you are using an established style, like MLA, APA, or the Chicago Manual of Style, then you may modify it as needed to fit their protocols. For example, months may be abbreviated; the order Month 00, 2000, may be preferred; an identifier, such as "Web" or "Print," may be added at the end of the entry; or quotation marks may be removed and titles edited to sentence style (Cap then all lowercase) rather than headline style ("Cap and Cap").

    The capitalization of the author's name will reflect her preference. Because many fan pseudonyms are only one word, or because they may include honorifics such as "Miss," or because the two words together may make a play on words, they ought to be treated as an unalterable single unit, and thus this style guide does not invert names. For fans who use a single-word pseudonym and whose preferences are unclear, the word ought to be capitalized both in text and in the bibliography, for ease of reading.

    Fan texts may be considered to be gen, or general (that is, no romantic pairing), unless specifically indicated otherwise. Any term current in your fandom, such as ship, het, femslash, or femmeslash, may be used. If no date is provided, you may use n.d. (for "no date") and insert your estimation of the date (at least the year) in brackets. For hard-copy fanzines that are photocopied reprints, the original date is always provided, never the date the item was copied.

    Note that the social sciences and humanities styles are identical except for the placement of the year. This styling reflects the most recent revision of the Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.). As a rule, in humanities style, the year will always come last, unless there is a URL, in which case, the URL appears last.

    If you are consulting a fanzine located in a library's special collections, the physical location of the document does not appear in the bibliography. Instead, it ought to appear in the paper's acknowledgments section, or in the body of the paper itself when describing the research methods.

    Ethics

    It is polite in the fan world to obtain the permission of the person who created the artwork you are citing and to use the URL that she prefers, which may lead not directly to the artwork.

    In older fan fiction, authors published under their names, not under pseudonyms. Please err on the side of caution and redact the author's name to initials if you suspect this to be the case. Similarly, do not post listings of tables of contents of print fanzines in publicly available sites for these older texts unless you are the author or publisher.

    To protect the privacy of fans and to retain the fan expectation of privacy even when citing publicly posted items, omit direct URLs to fan spaces, such as Dreamwidth.org and LiveJournal.com. Instead, provide an exact date and a general URL that includes the blog's username. However, if the author gives explicit permission to link, either in correspondence with you or via a "don't ask, just link" note on the item in question, a direct URL may be provided.

    In the academic world, it is considered unethical to refer to e-mails or listserv posts without the permission of the writers of these texts. Such citation will appear cited parenthetically in text; they do not appear in bibliographic listings.

    CITATION

    Social sciences style (media studies)

    Author Pseud, Never Inverted. 2000. "Name of Fan Artwork." Media Title [or Multifandom or Media Title/Media Title crossover] fan fiction. [or fan vid or manipulated artwork] Fullcharname/Fullcharname slash. [or het/ship] Italic Archive Name, 00 Month. [omit rest of date if not relevant] http://url_of_fanwork.com.

    Author Pseud, Never Inverted. 2000. "Name of Short Story." In Name of Fanzine, edited by Fan Editor, 00-00. Media Title fan fiction. Fullcharname/Fullcharname slash. [or het/ship] Press Name. http://press.url. [Omit URL; or provide street address.]

    Author Pseud, Never Inverted. 2000. "Name of Fan Vid." In Name of Compilation, edited by Fan Editor. Media Title fan vid. Fullcharname/Fullcharname slash. [or het/ship] Press Name. http://press.url. [Omit URL; or provide street address.]

    Poster Pseud, Never Inverted. 2000. "Thread Name." Name of Fan Forum. Media Title fan forum. 00 Month. http://url_of_fanwork.com.

    Author Pseud, Never Inverted. 2000. "Name of Meta Post." Media Title fan meta. [Omit media title if irrelevant.] Site Name, 00 Month. http://url_of_fanwork.com.

    Humanities style (English)

    Author Pseud, Never Inverted. "Name of Fan Artwork." Media Title [or Multifandom or Media Title/Media Title crossover] fan fiction. [or fan vid or manipulated artwork] Fullcharname/Fullcharname slash. [or het/ship] Italic Archive Name, 00 Month 2000. [omit month and day if not relevant] http://url_of_fanwork.com.

    Author Pseud, Never Inverted. "Name of Short Story." In Name of Fanzine, edited by Fan Editor, 00-00. Media Title fan fiction. Fullcharname/Fullcharname slash. [or het/ship] Press Name, 2000. http://press.url. [Omit URL; or provide street address.]

    Author Pseud, Never Inverted. "Name of Fan Vid." In Name of Compilation, edited by Fan Editor. Media Title fan vid. Fullcharname/Fullcharname slash. [or het/ship] Press Name, 2000. http://press.url. [Omit URL; or provide street address.]

    Poster Pseud, Never Inverted. "Thread Name." Name of Fan Forum. Media Title fan forum. 00 Month 2000. http://url_of_fanwork.com.

    Author Pseud, Never Inverted. "Name of Meta Post." Media Title fan meta. [Omit media title if irrelevant.] Site Name, 00 Month 2000. http://url_of_fanwork.com.

    EXAMPLES

    Social sciences style

    Alexis Fegan Black. 1979. "Though This Be Madness." In Naked Times #2 (fanzine), edited by Alexis Fegan Black, 00-00. Star Trek fan fiction. Kirk/Spock slash.

    Bill Koenig. 1996. "The Phoenix Affair." In Affairs to Remember (fanzine), 00-00. Man from U.N.C.L.E. fan fiction. Criterion Press.

    bookshop. 2010. "I'm Done Explaining to People Why Fanfic Is Okay." Fan meta. LiveJournal, 3 May. http://bookshop.livejournal.com/1044495.html.

    crysothemis. 2010. "Never Quite What It Looks Like (The Virtual Remix)." Stargate Atlantis fan fiction. John Sheppard/Rodney McKay slash. Archive of Our Own, 10 May. http://archiveofourown.org/works/85895.

    counteragent. 2010. "Good Fourth Walls Make Good Neighbors." Supernatural fan comic. LiveJournal, 9 January. http://community.livejournal.com/supernaturalart.

    Della Van Hise. 1979. "The Naked Truth." Editorial. In Naked Times #1, edited by Alexis Fegan Black, 00-00. Star Trek fanzine.

    Gayle F. 1979. Illustration to "Though This Be Madness," by Alexis Fegan Black. In Naked Times #2 (fanzine), edited by Alexis Fegan Black, 00. Star Trek fan artwork. Kirk/Spock slash.

    Lim. 2008. "Us." Multifandom fan vid. In Media Res, 1 February. http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/imr/2008/02/01/us-a-multivid-by-lim.

    Mary Crawford. 2010. "Trust in Me." V fan vid. LiveJournal, 9 August. http://marycrawford.livejournal.com.

    Naked Times #2. 1979. Edited by Alexis Fegan Black. Star Trek fanzine. Kirk/Spock slash.

    Speranza. N.d. [16 May 2009]. "One-Way Ticket." Stargate Atlantis fan fiction. Rodney McKay/John Sheppard slash. Trickster.org. http://trickster.org/speranza/cesper/onewaytix.html.

    SuzyQ. 2010. "What about Everything." In VividCon 2010 (convention compilation). Harry Potter fan vid.

    Viktor von Domm. 2010. "Imperial Steam Punk." Dakka Dakka. Warhammer 4K fan forum. 6 November. http://www.dakkadakka.com/dakkaforum/posts/list/326515.page.

    Humanities style

    Alexis Fegan Black. "Though This Be Madness." In Naked Times #2 (fanzine), edited by Alexis Fegan Black, 00-00. Star Trek fan fiction. Kirk/Spock slash. 1979.

    Bill Koenig. "The Phoenix Affair." In Affairs to Remember (fanzine), 00-00. Man from U.N.C.L.E. fan fiction. Criterion Press. 1996.

    bookshop. "I'm Done Explaining to People Why Fanfic Is Okay." Fan meta. LiveJournal, 3 May 2010. http://bookshop.livejournal.com/1044495.html.

    crysothemis. "Never Quite What It Looks Like (The Virtual Remix)." Stargate Atlantis fan fiction. John Sheppard/Rodney McKay slash. Archive of Our Own, 10 May 2010. http://archiveofourown.org/works/85895.

    counteragent. "Good Fourth Walls Make Good Neighbors." Supernatural fan comic. LiveJournal, 9 January 2010. http://community.livejournal.com/supernaturalart.

    Della Van Hise. "The Naked Truth." Editorial. In Naked Times #1, edited by Alexis Fegan Black, 00-00. Star Trek fanzine. 1979.

    Gayle F. Illustration to "Though This Be Madness," by Alexis Fegan Black. In Naked Times #2 (fanzine), edited by Alexis Fegan Black, 00. Star Trek fan artwork. Kirk/Spock slash. 1979.

    Lim. "Us." Multifandom fan vid. In Media Res, 1 February 2008. http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/imr/2008/02/01/us-a-multivid-by-lim.

    Mary Crawford. "Trust in Me." V fan vid. LiveJournal, 9 August 2010. http://marycrawford.livejournal.com.

    Naked Times #2. Edited by Alexis Fegan Black. Star Trek fanzine. Kirk/Spock slash. 1979.

    Speranza. "One-Way Ticket." Stargate Atlantis fan fiction. Rodney McKay/John Sheppard slash. Trickster.org, n.d. [16 May 2009]. http://trickster.org/speranza/cesper/onewaytix.html.

    SuzyQ. "What about Everything." In VividCon 2010 (convention compilation). Harry Potter fan vid. 2010.

    Viktor von Domm. "Imperial Steam Punk." Dakka Dakka. Warhammer 4K fan forum. 6 November 2010. http://www.dakkadakka.com/dakkaforum/posts/list/326515.page.

  • How To Add Subtitles and Translations to Your Videos

    Kristen Murphy - Wtorek, 20 września 2011 - 3:24pm
    Typ wiadomości::
    Tagi:

    This page was developed by Laura Shapiro.

    There are a lot of reasons to add subtitles to a video:

    • They make the video accessible to people who are deaf or hard of hearing
    • They make it easier to track and understand the lyrics if it's a music video
    • They offer an alternative to posting lyrics alongside the video of a music video
    • They provide the opportunity to translate your video into any language

    Fortunately, it's quite easy to subtitle a video. There are many different ways to do it, but perhaps the easiest is to use the handy tools at DotSub. One of the advantages of DotSub is that you can time each lyric to appear exactly when you want it to, so they can come in on the beat if you're making a music video and be fully integrated with the vid's aesthetics. And if you mark your video as "public", other DotSub users can add translations in any language, which is really pretty cool.

    Creating the Subtitles

    1. Register with DotSub and upload your video there.
    2. Follow the tutorial to add timestamped subtitles to your video in any language. This is super-super easy and it only takes about 10 minutes to subtitle a 3-minute video.
    3. Mark your translation/subtitles as complete. You can then test them on DotSub.
    4. If you want to use DotSub as your video host, you're done. Link to the video there, or use DotSub's embed code to embed the video wherever you want.

    If you want to add the subtitles to your videos on other streaming services or for download, read on.

    Add Subtitles to Videos on Other Streaming Hosts

    At the end of the subtitle creation process above, DotSub provides you with a SubRip subtitle file (.srt). This file can be used on a number of different streaming sites, including YouTube and Blip.tv. It can also be offered for download along with a video. The .srt file can also be used to create a subtitle track for a DVD.

    Add subtitles to a video on Blip.tv:

    1. Download the .srt file from DotSub.
    2. Upload your video to Blip.tv. When configuring your upload, click "Add additional format/captioning", browse to select your .srt file, and select the language from the drop-down.
    3. Upload the .srt file.
    4. Done! You can now use Blip's embed code to have your subtitled video appear wherever you want — your journal, your website, etc. Clicking the "CC" icon in the Blip.tv player turns the subtitles on.

    Add subtitles to a video on YouTube:

    1. Download the .srt file from DotSub.
    2. Upload your video to YouTube. When configuring your upload, click "Captions".
    3. Click "Add a Caption Track" and browse to select your .srt file. Select the language from the drop-down, and make sure "Caption file" is selected, not "Transcript file".
    4. Upload the .srt file.
    5. Done! You can now use YouTube's embed code to have your subtitled video appear wherever you want — your journal, your website, etc. Clicking the "CC" icon in the YouTube player turns the subtitles on.

    The process is similar for many other streaming sites.

    Offer Subtitles for Downloaded Videos

    VLC will play a video with subtitles as long as the video file and the subtitle file are in the same directory (folder).

    1. Download the .srt file from DotSub.
    2. Rename the .srt file so it has the exact same name as your video. For instance, "MyVideo.avi" and "MyVideo.srt".
    3. Make a folder with both files in it.
    4. Use Win-Zip or the Mac OS's "Make archive" feature to make a .zip archive of the folder.
    5. Offer this .zip file for download, and you're done. You may want to provide instructions to viewers about keeping the two files together.

    Alternatives to DotSub

    Captioning is taking off and there are now several alternatives to DotSub. The best seems to be Universal Subtitles, which works the same way as DotSub but has a better interface. However, with Universal Subtitles one does not necessarily need to re-upload the video.

  • Fan Video Bibliographies

    Kristen Murphy - Wtorek, 20 września 2011 - 3:22pm
    Typ wiadomości::
    Tagi:
  • How To Stream Video From Your Own Site

    Kristen Murphy - Wtorek, 20 września 2011 - 3:17pm
    Typ wiadomości::
    Tagi:

    NOTE: These instructions will only work if you have your own website, and if your host allows streaming Flash; some hosts don't. If you can host the streaming vid on your own website, you can embed it other places, such as blogs or journals.

    This tutorial will show you how to create a Flash video file and give you several options for streaming:

    • create an embeddable streaming video
    • create a streaming video that can't be embedded by other people
    • stream a single video on your webpage
    • stream multiple videos on your webpage

    Parts of this tutorial were originally posted to rhoboat's Dreamwidth; many thanks to rhoboat for her kind permission to use it!

    Step 1: Convert your file to Flash

    First you need to convert your video files to Flash video (.flv) format. Some video editing programs/suites may have a converter built-in that you can use; if you're all set with doing the conversion, skip down to Step 2: Upload your video.

    If your editing software doesn't already convert to Flash, you can use a third-party program. There are paid programs out there for reasonable prices, but there are also some free or shareware options.

    We're listing one option each for Windows, Mac, and Linux to get you started, but there may be others you'll like better if you look around. All of the listed options handle a variety of file formats.

    Windows users

    Windows users can download SUPER to convert videos to FLV. (You need to click through several pages to get to the download link, but the pages all have information on them that you might find helpful.)

    Once you've installed SUPER, you'll see something like this:

    Screenshot of SUPER

    For a 16:9 streaming video file, try these settings:

    • Output:
      • swf/flv (Flash)
      • Flash video codec
      • mp3 audio codec
    • Video:
      • 640x360
      • 16:9
      • 25fps
      • 1056 kbps bitrate
      • Keep Hi Quality, Top Quality, and Stretch It checked
      • Uncheck 48K audio.
    • Audio:
      • 22050 Sampling Freq
      • 2 Channels
      • 64 kbps bitrate

    Jump to "playing with settings"

    Mac users

    Mac users can download ffmpegX; to use it, you'll need to download several compilers, all linked on that page.

    • The mpeg2enc binary link has to be control-clicked to work.
    • You do not need to download FLVTool2; the base version will do the conversion.
    • This is shareware, not freeware, but you can use it free.

    Once you've installed ffmpegX and launched the program, you'll see something like this:

    Screenshot of ffmpegx

    For a 16:9 streaming video file, try these settings:

    • Target format:
      • Ignore; these are presets, you want to customize instead
    • Video tab:
      • 640x360
      • 16:9
      • NTSC 29.97fps
      • 1100 kbps bitrate
    • Audio tab:
      • 22050 Sampling Freq
      • Stereo
      • 64 kbps bitrate
    • Options tab:
      • High Quality

    Jump to "playing with settings"

    Linux users

    Linux users can download WinFF to convert videos to FLV (works on Ubuntu, Debian, Redhat, Pascal/Lazarus; also works on Windows).

    [screenshots and settings, coming soon!]

    Playing with settings

    The settings here help keep the file size down while still maintaining pretty good quality overall.

    • Managing file size is a balancing act between overall quality and how much bandwidth you're willing to use/how playable you want it to be for people on older, slower systems.
    • Play around with the settings until you're happy with the result.

    Step 2: Upload your video

    Once you're happy with your Flash settings and have your .flv file, upload that to your own personal webspace, such as in a "stream" folder. The direct link to your video will be something like this: http:// www.YOURWEBSITE.com/stream/video.flv

    Step 3: Install a flash player on your website

    Next, you need a Flash player. For this tutorial, we're using the JW FLV Player, which you can download for free at that link. The player options you choose will determine whether or not people can embed your vids.

    • Allow people to embed your vids:
      • By default, the option for the "Viral" plugin is selected; "viral" here means "embeddable", and you should keep that selected if you want a player that will provide viewers with an embed code for your vid.
    • Don't allow embedding:
      • If you'd rather people didn't embed your vid (e.g., to protect your bandwidth), deselect the "Viral" option to download the standard player.

    Once you've downloaded the file, unzip it and upload all of those files into a folder (flvplayer) on your webspace. The direct link to the player should look something like this:

    • http:// www.YOURWEBSITE.com/flvplayer/player-viral.swf  (embeddable player)
    • http:// www.YOURWEBSITE.com/flvplayer/player.swf  (standard player)

    Step 4: Embed your video

    Lastly, you need the embedding code for posting your streaming video, on your website or elsewhere.

    Generating the code for your website

    For HTML codes for use on your own site you can use this setup wizard, which allows you to plug in your own parameters and preview the vid, so you can see how things look before you go live, and make any necessary adjustments. The wizard streams the vid from your site — you don't need to upload it again.

    • "Select an Example Setup"
      • Go with the default "flvplayer with a single video"
    • "Change your Flashvars"
      • This is where you set up the player itself.
      • There are only four necessary fields:
        • source (the player on your website)
        • height (this needs to be 20 pixels more than the height of your video, to make room for the control bar on the bottom of the player)
        • width
        • file (your streaming video on your website)
      • Click on "Embed parameters". For a 640x360 vid, set them up like this:
        • Source: http: //www.YOURWEBSITE.com/flvplayer/player.swf (or [...]/player-viral.swf, whichever you chose)
        • Height: 380 (Note: 360+20 pixels to make room for the control bar on the bottom)
        • Width: 640
      • Click on "File properties" and enter the location of your FLV file:
        • File: http: //www.YOURWEBSITE.com/stream/YOURFLV.flv
      • Click on "Update Preview & Code"to see how it looks
        • Your vid will appear under "Preview Your Player" and you'll be able to play it.
        • If there are problems, adjust your parameters until it looks right.

    Embed the video on your website

    Once it looks good, copy/paste the generated code into your webpage's HTML file where you want the vid to play. You'll need to make a few tweaks to make it work.

    • First, at the top of the code, the setup wizard should generate a line of code like this:
      <script type="text/javascript"
      
      src="/embed/swfobject.js"></script>
    • Change the /embed to the folder you put your player in (/flvplayer) to get src="/flvplayer/swfobject.js".
      • If it just says src="/swfobject.js", insert /flvplayer
      • If you upload your page and don't see a vid, you either forgot to change this or had a typo.
    • If you want to have multiple vids on your page, you can either leave the line above each vid, or insert the correct line into your html head material and delete each instance in the individual vid codes, whichever you prefer.
    • To embed a single video on a page:
      • Look for this line: <div id='player'>This text will be replaced</div> (This may say either div id='player' or div id='mediaspace'.)
      • Delete "This text will be replaced".
      • The full code for your embedded vid will look something like this:
        <script type='text/javascript' src='/flvplayer/swfobject.js'></script>
         
        <div id='player'></div>
        
         
        <script type='text/javascript'>
        var so = new SWFObject('http://YOURWEBSITE.com/flvplayer/player-viral.swf','mpl','640','380','9');
          so.addParam('allowfullscreen','true');
          so.addParam('allowscriptaccess','always');
          so.addParam('wmode','opaque');
          so.addVariable('file','http://YOURWEBSITE.com/stream/YOURVIDEO.flv');
          so.write('player');
        </script> 
    • To embed multiple videos on the same page:
      • If you have more vids, or if you think you'll want to add vids at a later date, you need to change a couple more things.
      • Look for this line at the top of the code: <div id='player'>This text will be replaced</div> (This may say div id='mediaspace'.)
      • Look for this line at the bottom of the code: so.write('player') (This may say so.write('mediaspace') — it will match the div id from the beginning of the code.)
      • Delete "This text will be replaced".
      • Rename 'player' (or 'mediaspace') in both instances to something unique and specific to each individual vid.
        • So, if you have three vids, "Wind Beneath My Wings", "Holding Out For a Hero", and "My Immortal", and you want to stream all three, you could set up the codes like this:
          <div id='wind'></div>
          
          [rest of code for first vid]
          so.write('wind') <div id='hero'></div> [rest of code for second vid] so.write('hero') <div id='immortal'></div> [rest of code for third vid] so.write('immortal')
      • When you're done, the full code for an embedded vid will look something like this:
        <script type='text/javascript' src='/flvplayer/swfobject.js'></script>
         
        <div id='wind'></div>
        
         
        <script type='text/javascript'>
        var so = new SWFObject('http://YOURWEBSITE.com/flvplayer/player-viral.swf','mpl','640','380','9');
          so.addParam('allowfullscreen','true');
          so.addParam('allowscriptaccess','always');
          so.addParam('wmode','opaque');
          so.addVariable('file','http://YOURWEBSITE.com/stream/windwings.flv');
          so.write('wind');
        </script> 

    Once you've finished tweaking the code, you can upload your page. Your vid should be embedded and playable.

    Embedding elsewhere

    • If you used the viral player:
      • To get an embed code to put somewhere else you can simply play and then pause your vid; the player will provide the embedding code.
    • If you used the standalone player:

    Once you have your embed code, you can then insert on other sites as appropriate (e.g., on Blogger, simply paste the code into a post; on LiveJournal or its clones/forks, use the "Embed Media" option). Depending on the service you're using, you may need a plug-in to work with streaming files (e.g., on Wordpress you can use VodPod; on Joomla, you can use All Videos).

    Default sample for a 16:9 video:

    Default sample for a 4:3 video:

    You can play with all the embedding code parameters for different colors and such, and you can even download pretty skins for your player — just upload them to the same folder as your JW FLV player, and insert that URL into the "skin" parameter.

    You can also change the video frame size if you want.

    • For example, if you want to fit your 640x360 video into a 500-pixel-wide blog post, you can simply set up a smaller player without having to re-export or re-convert your video.
    • Test out different embedding heights and widths so that you don't have black bars with your video.
  • Options for Hosting Streaming Video

    Kristen Murphy - Wtorek, 20 września 2011 - 3:08pm
    Typ wiadomości::
    Tagi:

    Until the OTW launches the Torrent of Our Own or another full hosting option, fan video makers will need to host their vids somewhere else, though we hope that all fan video creators will choose to create stable (and searchable) shell pages for their works at the Archive of Our Own.

    Below are some suggestions (and evaluations) of the various hosting options currently available. Please note that these are the compiled opinions of fans and represent the best of our knowledge at the current time; circumstances may chance and opinions may vary. If you have additional information about any of these sites or would like us to add another site to the list, please contact us.

    1. Host and Stream from your Own Site

    Useful Info/Directions: How to stream from your own site

    Positives: You have control over your own works.

    Negatives: 1) Having your own site can be costly, particularly if a video goes viral. 2) Videos streamed from individual sites are currently not allowed to be embedded at the AO3 for security reasons. 3) Hosting on your own site may make it difficult for others to find your vids. However, you can always post your video's download links and notes about it to a works page on the Archive of Our Own.

    2. Critical Commons

    Useful Info/Directions: How to get and use an advanced user account at Critical Commons

    Positives: Critical Commons is a nonprofit site that explicitly welcomes fans and supports fair use. It also offers high quality downloads as well as streaming and embeds.

    Negatives: Historically a site for film and media professors, fans may find its interface unfannish and difficult to use. You also have to apply for advanced user status to be able to use all the site's features; fan-friendly instructions for applying for "advanced user" status and using the site are provided at the link above.

    3. YouTube

    Useful Info/Directions: How to Dispute A Takedown

    Positives: Still the best known video hosting and streaming site, YouTube provides high quality video and a variety of features for users.

    Negatives: As YouTube's "Copyright School" video shows, the site is still biased towards corporations and against fair users. YouTube is also known for prohibiting uploads as well as for its many takedowns. As the best known commercial video site, YouTube gets more Cease and Desist requests than anywhere else. Videos hosted there typically have banner ads on them and may be linked to other advertisements for related products. Some content is blocked in various countries, including Germany, UK, France, Argentina, and Turkey.

    4. Vimeo

    Useful Info/Directions: Vimeo FAQ

    Positives: Vimeo offers good quality, and up to 500MB of uploaded video per week for free members. Many fans also appreciate the security controls the site offers (public, private, contact only, password protected).

    Negatives: According to Wikipedia, blocked in: China, Thailand, Tunisia, Vietnam, Iran. They are also known to be "twitchy" when it comes to cancelling accounts, so many users feel a lack of security.

    5. Archive.org

    Useful Info/Directions: FAQ about archiving video at archive.org

    Positives: The Internet Archive is another nonprofit dedicated to preserving internet history and providing universal access to these materials. Users can release their work under a number of Creative Commons licenses. It also allows users to download as well as stream and embed video.

    Negatives: Because of limited bandwidth, archive.org converts uploaded files into very small sizes and so streaming is often low-quality and pixelated. Downloaded video is of a higher quality. The site is stable but often slow.

    6. Dailymotion

    Useful Info/Directions: Dailymotion FAQ

    Positives: An increasingly popular site, Dailymotion provides decent levels of internet exposure if you want people to see your work.

    Negatives: Video quality is mediocre. The site also doesn't allow .mov files.

    7. Vidders

    Useful Info/Directions: Membership is mandatory: free for watchers and users uploading 1-5 videos; users can subscribe to add more.

    Positives: Billing itself as "the ultimate vidding community," Vidders.net has many social networking features as well as an elaborate tagging system (fandom, ship, character, music, genre...). The site feels community-oriented and safe; videos are relatively high quality. Updated info: Vidders now reports that vids can be embedded by all members; Vidders is also a whitelisted site at the A03, so members can also easily embed vids there. Members can sign in using Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo, or Google/YouTube logins.

    Negatives: Members only; nonmembers can't watch vids on the site without logging in. Vidders.net also censors vids for some content because of their hosts' TOS.

    8. DivShare

    Useful Info/Directions: Free accounts give 5GB if storage, 50GB of usage.

    Positives: One fan notes that the storage and usage for free members might be too little for a very popular vidder but for most users it's fine. So far there are no reports of deletions, even when users haven't logged in regularly. Uploading is easy and vids can be streamed and viewed online.

    Negatives: There are ads, popovers when you log in and then sidebar ads.

  • Links Roundup for 24 August 2011

    Claudia Rebaza - Środa, 24 sierpnia 2011 - 7:51pm
    Typ wiadomości::

    Here’s a roundup of stories about how companies are looking at fan-made videos that might be of interest:

    • Rebecca Tushnet, chair of the OTW's Legal Committee, was quoted in the Wall Street Journal's Tech Diary column on the growing atmosphere of acceptance of video mashups and the marketing possibilities they present for companies and their products. She noted, however, that acceptance is coming more quickly from the film and television industries than the music industry. This suggests that fans making music vids are likely to continue having to assert and defend the "fair use" status of their work.
    • Another recent news item highlighted an example of the phenomenon Tushnet discussed, when Variety explored the responses of copyright holders to fan use of their material. In this case, the article cites the positive attitude of Hasbro to the many mashups of My Little Pony done by a group of mostly male fans referred to as "bronies." While Hasbro's attitude is made clear, there's no mention of how the music copyright holders see the use of their songs in these "trackjacking" videos. Also lacking from the article is any acknowledgement that this type of fan video has a historical context, or that it falls creatively close to a tradition of work by primarily female fans.

    If you're part of the My Little Pony fandom, create trackjacking videos, or know any stories you can share to help preserve our history related to these topics, why not create some posts on Fanlore? Fanlore is open to contributions by all fans for any and all fandoms.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

    Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Fair Use School

    .fcoppa - Piątek, 15 lipca 2011 - 5:27pm
    Typ wiadomości::
    Tagi:

    Kudos to Patrick McKay for winning Public Knowledge's "Copyright School" Video Challenge, a contest that asked remixers to come up with a more balanced education video than YouTube's "Copyright School" (which, notoriously, featured a squirrel in a pirate hat.) You can see the video here:

  • Copyright School Video Challenge!

    .fcoppa - Piątek, 22 kwietnia 2011 - 5:59pm
    Typ wiadomości::
    Tagi:

    Calling all vidders and remix artists! Public Knowledge is holding a Copyright School Video Challenge: to explain what you can and can't do under fair use better than YouTube's "copyright school", which has been criticized for focusing more on the CAN'T than on the CAN. As Public Knowledge explains, "While 'Copyright School' does a great job of telling you what you can't do with copyrighted content, it does a very poor job of telling you what you can do with copyrighted content--namely, remix, reuse and repurpose it without permission from the rightsholder as allowed under the doctirine of fair use." The winning video will get a $1000 prize and be featured on the Public Knowledge website. Judges include political remixers Jonathan McIntosh and Elisa Kreisinger, activist and scholar Brian Rowe, and Kirby Ferguson, director of the web series Everything is a Remix.

    You can find out more at publicknowledge.org and at politicalremixvideo.com. (Important: the challenge deadline is May 23, 2011!)

  • Fanivideot ja multimedia

    .Helka Lantto - Poniedziałek, 27 grudnia 2010 - 4:57pm
    Typ wiadomości::
    Tagi:

    Fanien luomien multimediateosten kirjo on laaja: fanitaidetta, fanivideoita, animemusiikkivideoita, kantaa ottavia remiksejä, fanielokuvia, fanitrailereita, machinimaa, podfikkejä ja äänikirjoja, ja niin edelleen. OTW (Transformatiivisten teosten järjestö) on sitoutunut pitämään nämä teokset fanien ulottuvilla ja säilyttämään niiden historian. Fanivideo- ja multimediaprojektiemme tarkoitus on tarjota tietoa ja resursseja koko fanivideoyhteisölle ja myös selittää näitä teoksia ja selventää niiden kontekstia muulle maailmalle.

    Fan Video Roadmap (Fanivideoprojektin kehityssuunnitelma)

    Fan Video Roadmap (Fanivideoprojektin kehityssuunnitelma) esittelee OTW:n tulevia ominaisuuksia ja palveluita, mukaan lukien suunnitelmamme tehdä mahdolliseksi videomateriaalin sisällyttäminen Archive of Our Own – AO3 -sivustolle (Oma Arkisto).

    Resursseja fanivideoiden tekijöille

    Seuraavat sivut sisältävät tietoa, josta toivomme olevan hyötyä fanivideoiden tekijöille. Jos sinulla on ehdotuksia sivuista, joita meidän kannattaisi lisätä, uusia ehdotuksia taikka korjauksia olemassa oleviin sivuihin, ota meihin yhteyttä.

    Resursseja fanivideoiden tutkijoille

    • Julkaisuluettelo fanivideoista: ylläpidetään Zoterossa ja päivitetään kahdesti vuodessa. Viimeisin vienti: 28. marraskuuta 2013.
    • Faniteosten tyyliohje: kuinka viitata fanivideoihin (ja muihin tieteelliisiin teoksiin) akateemisessa yhteydessä.
    • Vidding (2008), OTW:n tuottama dokumentti MIT:n New Media Literacy -projektille.
    • Vidding Documentary (2011), tekijä: Abigail Christensen
    • Multimediateosten tieteellinen arkisto (tulossa): Kirjasto tieteellisistä artikkeleista jotka käsittelevät fanivideoita. Haluamme myös tarjota julkaisua suunnitteleville tutkijoille vakaan lähdearkiston, jotta tulevilla artikkeleilla ja kirjoilla on pysyvät viitteet.

    Vidding History (Fanivideoiden historia) -projektit

    OTW:llä on tällä hetkellä laki- ja tieteellistä osaamista näytellyn median fanivideoiden tekemisestä. Fanivideoiden historia -projektin tarkoituksena on tuottaa palveluja fanivideoyhteisölle, sekä selittää fanivideoita ja tarjota niille asiayhteys muulle maailmalle. Projekteihimme kuuluvat tällä hetkellä: Fanivideoiden suullinen historia -projekti, Test Suite of Fair Use Vids (Fanivideoiden kohtuullisen käytön ennakkotapaukset), and Vidding (2008), OTW:n tuottama dokumentti MIT:n New Media Literacy -projektille. Myös suuri osa OTW:n oikeusneuvontaan liittyvästä työstä on liittynyt fanivideoihin; lisätietoa tästä löydät Legal Advocacy (Fanien oikeuksien ajaminen) -sivulta.

    The Dark Archive (Pimeä arkisto)

    Pimeän arkiston tavoitteena on säilyttää ja suojella fanivideoita; tämä arkisto ei tule olemaan internetissä tai yleisesti käytettävissä. Lisätietoja löydät Fanivideoprojektin kehityssuunnitelma -sivulta.

    A Torrent of Our Own (Oma Torrent)

    A Torrent of Our Own (Oma Torrent) tulee olemaan yksityinen seurantapalvelin fair use -käytännön mukaisille transformatiivisille faniteoksille, mukaan lukien: fanivideot, fanifiktiotrailerit, fanitaide, PDF-muotoiset zinet, AMV:t, kantaa ottavat remiksit, machinima, ja muut transformatiiviset digitaaliset faniteokset. Lisätietoja löydät Fanivideoprojektin kehityssuunnitelma -sivulta.

Pages

Subscribe to Vidding