Entertainment Industries

  • OTW Fannews: It's Your Fault

    Av .Lindsey D på onsdagen, 8 april 2015 - 4:59pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    OTWFannews banner with text It's Your Fault and a hand with a finger pointed forward

    • A post at GQ focused on a documentary about the making of a fan film tribute to another film and decided that fanworks have become too common for notice. "[T]he genre's been so co-opted by the mainstream that it's now part of the marketing playbook. Cultural gatekeepers are now enlisting us to submit our footage for their projects. Take the Ridley Scott-produced documentary Life in a Day, or EMIC, Google Play's recent collaboration with Christopher Nolan to promote Interstellar. In a weird way, people look at you funny if you're not filming something for your YouTube channel, or figuring out how to conquer Vine. These days, it's almost more audacious to say, 'No thanks—I'm just gonna be the audience.'"
    • Nintendo Life didn't get the memo, and instead wrote about a Zelda fan film. "The Zelda Project is a fan run website based in Los Angeles, California that focuses on recreating various scenes and locales from the Zelda series via photography, film, and art. Player Piano is a YouTube channel run by Filmmaker Tom Grey that primarily focuses on classically-trained musician, Sonya Belousova, recreating video game music on a piano. Both of these groups appear to be quite talented, so this fan-film could definitely be worth a watch when it's completed."
    • A number of outlets wrote about the implications of the all-female and all-male Ghostbusters remakes. Salon decided that the fault doesn't just lie with a sexist culture but that the blame also lies with fanworks. "[S]tudios are actually listening to their customers, and remakes are what you want. It’s what you’re making, after all — and by 'you' I mean the vast majority of people out in the indie fan world that supposedly serves as our alternative, our escape from the moribund studio system. What has the Internet been spending all this time making? Fan fiction, fan art, fan films. It’s hard to tell at times if the people making 'gritty reboot' trailers are parodying Hollywood or unironically creating something they want."
    • The author of Vulture's recent piece on fanfiction was interviewed by New Hampshire Public Radio, and asked if she thought there was great fanfiction available. "I found fanfiction that was ok and every once in a while something that I thought 'Oh, that's pretty good'. But I think...it's really more the writing and the reading and the sharing than the end product...Every single piece of fanfiction is like a work in progress...and it's such a sort of group experience that it's difficult to apply a term like 'great' to it. That's like saying 'Is there a great fairy tale', I mean there isn't a definitive version of any fairy tale, there's just a million different tellings." (No transcript available).

    Has the spread of fanworks reached a tipping point? Write about your evidence in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Sharing Fandom

    Av Janita Burgess på torsdagen, 5 mars 2015 - 6:35pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner with text that reads OTW Fannews Sharing Fandom

    • Writer Shawna Benson examined patterns of fandom growth and activity that she'd observed while moderating social media for The 100's Writers’ Room, as well as social media lessons learned. "Yes, we sell the US shows to other countries, but what do we do to accommodate those fanbases which spring up in other countries? Suddenly, the 'official' accounts feel less useful. They don’t get the CW in the UK, Australia, Brazil, France or Spain, or even Canada — the main countries which outside of the U.S. watch The 100. How do we accommodate those fans? The official accounts are restricted in this. Guess what? Writers’ rooms are not."
    • As part of International Fanworks Day, LiveJournal community Mari di Challenge interviewed OTW Translation Committee chairs Hele Braunstein and Priscilla del Cima about the committee's work (article in Italian). Both spoke about their fannish backgrounds, how AO3 fits together with the OTW and its other projects, how the organization sustains those projects financially and personnel-wise, what the OTW's vision of fandom is, and what changes might happen in the next five years.
    • Book review blogger Traci began a series of posts about the OTW. "I was recently reading an article and it was mentioned that media seems to 'see bronies as far more newsworthy that Organization for Transformative Works or the Vlogbrothers' Nerdfighter movement.' Now, I see a lot of things about Nerfighters, and the Green brothers in particular, but have not seen much on OTW outside of those in the know. So I decided to fangirl all over one of my favorite organizations for a post. Then I realized that I would need at least a couple posts to fully share my love and appreciation."
    • The Verge's Entertainment Editor Emily Yoshida discussed her discovery of fanfiction on the StarWarsChicks.com posting board. "One of the first things I was drawn to besides the message board was...The Library, it was a fanfic archive of the stories everyone in the community had written." She was asked to speculate about why fanfic writers seemed to be mostly by female writers. She suggested that the medium of writing was better suited to women. "It's non-visual, it takes a long time to read somebody's whole novel...and that's the payoff is this expectation and this waiting and this buildup...but it gets that same kind of following and addictive aspect to it." (No transcript available).

    Fanlore is a place for all fans to share their knowledge about fans and fandoms. Add details to an existing entry or start a new one!

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Interacting with Canon

    Av algonquin på tisdagen, 3 mars 2015 - 5:12pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    • The it-getters at PBS' Idea Channel released an episode focusing on fanfiction & LGBT representation. "Official writers are...gesturing at alternate universes, at relationships that could exist between characters -- were the world of the show...not what it actually is. I see this as the sacred charge of so much fanfiction, to express the love left unexpressed in so much popular culture." (No transcript available.)
    • Wired's Angry Nerd spoke about why the existence of Fifty Shades of Grey is vital to fanfic. "The key component is fans' passionately engaging with the work and digging more deeply into fictional worlds than their creators ever did." He goes on to discuss how much of what Hollywood is producing is no different than what fans are doing in the way they re-imagine old franchises. (No transcript available.)
    • An article in Vice attempted to identify the reasons behind political fanfiction. "Franke-Ruta discusses the ways that we project our own imaginations and beliefs onto serious considerations of political figures and issues. We do the same with our coverage of sports, culture, and viral news as well—we're constantly granting individuals and events symbology, emotional impact, and an imaginary, packaged takeaway. There are many ways to do this—especially online, where we can create an identity more in line with others' than our own more easily than we can in real life. But fan fiction might be the most extreme example: You are, literally, taking control of reality."
    • While the stories above featured fan art and fanfiction, The Mary Sue tipped fans to a Imgur gif tool. "All you have to do is find the video you want online, plug the URL into Imgur’s new tool, and tell it the start and end points that you want to memorialize forever in a glorious, infinitely looped animation. If the created GIF would be larger than 10MB, Imgur also automatically converts it to a much more efficient GIFV, which is a standard from improved video clips that they’ve been pushing since last year."

    What fanworks have you seen that have had an impact outside fan communities? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Developing a Clue

    Av Kiri Van Santen på tisdagen, 30 december 2014 - 5:50pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    graphic by Sidhrat of a road swooping into the sky

    • Gamasutra featured a post by James Cox that discussed his struggle to define fanfiction. "Even bad Mary Sue fan fiction has its place. Have you ever read My Immortal?... I read the whole thing once as an endurance test. It’s atrocious, but enjoyably so. Almost like a masochistic fun. After all of this, my new definition of fan fiction is as follows: Fan fiction is a thing that some people do; it usually involves being inspired by another’s work. Some fan fiction is good. Some is bad. That’s about as in depth as I can go right now with my definition. Fan fiction became such a blanket term: how some fan fiction became so successful, how creative people can write it, how it’s hard to tell if a work is a fan fiction or if it just draws on the lore of another work. Is Tolkien just fan fiction of Anglo-Saxon and Norse mythology?"
    • While a lot of people seem to struggle with the definition of fanfiction, other sites seem to be particularly clueless when it comes to fandom activities. For example, in an article on Lost Remote the author discusses the site Moviepilot which gives some contributors to its writing platform extra perks for particular content. The author concludes "Not only is it worth knowing who your fans are, the platform works because it’s authentic: fans talking to fans without any pretense. Where else can one be really, really, sad about “The Walking Dead” winter finale or gush over “Doctor Who” donuts?"
    • Moviepilot's hardly alone in wanting to monetize fan activities. In a Guardian blogpost, Victoria James suggested Amazon wants to take on Wattpad as the premiere site for amateur writers. "The internet shopping site has just launched its own social reading and writing platform, Kindle WriteOn, a move characterised by Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian as 'trying to eat [Wattpad’s] lunch'." There is already a space for fanfic but "[s]o far the fan fiction category appears unloved – “0 reads 0 likes 0 follows 0 comments” is the pitiless tally of a bowtie-themed “crossover” between Dr Who and the Thor movieverse. Perhaps the invitations haven’t yet reached fan fiction fans, or maybe the problem is the space Amazon built for fanfic writers last year: Kindle Worlds."
    • Even people in fandom can use tips sometimes, highlighted by a post in Podfic Tips offering ways to comment about podfic. "One of the topics that caught my attention through this year's pod-aware was feedback, and having tools to leave feedback. Sometimes, especially if we're more used to leaving comments on other types of fanworks or if like me the Fandom Language (often: English) isn't the language we're most comfortable with, we're at a loss for words. As such, when leaving comments on podfics, or when reccing podfics, I like to build myself a little vocabulary list. Here's my lists of what I often comment on and what words I choose from, in case it might help others."

    What fandom definitions and practices do you know about? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Celebrities & Fandom Risks

    Av Janita Burgess på fredagen, 12 december 2014 - 5:26pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Drawing of spotlights withtext in the style of the Hollywood sign that reads OTW Fannews Celebrities and Fandom Risks

    • Discussions about celebrity fandom have popped up on various sites, such as The Guardian's article about the lessons learned from allegations against Bill Cosby. "Before the internet, when the shroud of celebrity mystique was easier to maintain...fans felt less complicit in continuing to swoon over and patronize icons who were rumored to have done heinous things...But now, with bystanders always on hand to serve as amateur chroniclers and distributors of celebrity missteps and misdeeds, it’s hard to obscure or deny to fans what they’ve seen with their own eyes."
    • At SB Nation a similar discussion took place over social issues and sports fandom. "At times, hero worship of sports stars, or even teams as a whole, reaches a point where it can be described as something eerily similar to a cult of personality. That's a culture that can preclude educated opinions on and well-informed public discourse of serious issues involving said star or team. Examples of worst-case scenarios, like those at Steubenville and Penn State, which involve crimes that should still churn stomachs upon reflection, not only harbored such evil acts, but also led to their attempted cover-ups."
    • The Queen's University Journal explored why a connection with celebrities seems to exist. "Spitzberg co-authored an article and study titled 'Fanning the Flames of Fandom: Celebrity Worship, Parasocial Interaction, and Stalking'." In a 2001 study "[s]eventy-five per cent noted they’ve experienced 'strong attachments to more than one celebrity'...'[Parasocial interaction is] the idea that we develop relationships with people who we experience in the media, in much the same sort of way that we experience relationships with people in real life.'"
    • Fandom can be risky for many in more physical ways, whether for Russian women in football fandom or Chinese fans in slash fiction fandom. "'The law doesn’t differentiate between dan mei and gay fiction in any way,' says a 28-year-old writer who asked not to be identified by name. In his view, crackdowns are a function of political whims, 'so if the government decides it’s going to crack down on gay-related content, it’ll just cast a wide net and go for dan mei, too.'"

    What aspects of fandom have troubled you? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Speaking Out for Fandom

    Av Kiri Van Santen på fredagen, 21 november 2014 - 5:27pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner by Alice of a simple drawing of a human with a speech bubble containing a heart and a page of writing'

    • While quite a few articles in the media continue to portray fanwork creators as somehow abnormal, even while acknowledging their part within a larger remix culture of popular entertainment, others set fandom more positively in this cultural environment. This support has come from fans and entertainers alike.
    • The 'Not Another Teen Wolf Podcast' interviewed actress Eaddy Mays about fanfiction. "'First and foremost, the media portrayal of fanfiction infuriates me. It’s immature, among many things. It’s bullying. And it should be illegal, frankly." Mays proved herself an it-getter. “It’s when she’s talking about a book the Sterek Campaign sent her about the popular slash ship that you can see exactly how much she takes this issue to heart. She picks it up to make a point, flipping it over and noticing something written on the back for the first time...'It says, ‘Made with love.'' She has to pause, the emotion evident in her voice. 'Can you wrap it up better than that? I don’t think so. That’s it. It’s made with love. So why would you cast any dispersion on that?'”
    • Not all actors seem as in touch with slash fanworks. The Mary Sue focused on contrasting comments made by Benedict Cumberbatch and Orlando Jones in the same week, with Jones saying "'I get it—it’s another way to go but it’s no less valid than what we’re doing and it’s certainly interesting, so I really get a kick out of that. To read fan fiction and to see fan art and to watch other people’s artistry paint different colors on top of what we’re doing… how can you be mad at that? That’s just completely awesome!'"
    • At Bustle, Emma Lord wrote about getting over her embarrassment with fanfic and countering common arguments. "[W]hen did any form of writing get deemed 'lazy'? We’re actively creating something, whether or not it will be widely consumed or appreciated. We’re testing ourselves as writers all the time, trying to see if we can keep the original author’s characters true to themselves, or if we can find ways to surprise and intrigue readers who are into the same fandoms we are. That is the polar opposite of lazy!"

    Who have you seen standing up for fanworks? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Looking Back

    Av Kiri Van Santen på måndagen, 27 oktober 2014 - 4:26pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Actress Alyson Hannigan posing with her doubles from the Buffy episode Doppleganger

    • Romance writer Keira Andrews discussed how attitudes toward fandom and fan fiction have changed over the years. "Fandom was Fight Club, and we didn’t discuss it with showrunners or actors... Sometimes I really miss the days of having our own secret world, but that horse is out of the barn and galloping out of sight... I honestly think that you have to be a fan to understand fandom. Many people know about fandom now, but they’re still Muggles, if you will. Or maybe Squibs."
    • Celebuzz ranked pop music fan base names. "In the world of pop fandom, it is de rigueur to name the fan base to which you belong (or to have your chosen idol name it for you.) Over the last several years, we have seen groups with nicknames like Little Monsters, Beliebers, and Arianators grow into power and change the way we talk about musicians and their fans."
    • On PasteTV, Amy Glynn talked about how binge-watching Buffy got her through her divorce. "All I wanted was a timeout from my own reality; a break. I wasn’t expecting a breakthrough. But a Joss-curated trip back to growing up showed me some interesting stuff about adulthood. It was also the first step back to my 'real' life, or whatever was going to be real from here on out. The first time around, Buffy made me laugh. This time, it made me see."
    • Keidra Chaney of The Learned Fangirl reviewed rock critic Gina Arnold's book about the 1993 album, Exile in Guyville. "[I]t’s about the culture and mindset of the early 90′s indie rock scene in Chicago and beyond, the hyper-masculine, hyper-obsessive club dubbed 'Guyville' by Phair and others at the time. It’s also about the changes in technology and culture that have changed what it means to be a part of the indie rock scene as a performer or a fan in the past 20 years."

    What changes have you seen in your fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Business

    Av Janita Burgess på lördagen, 20 september 2014 - 5:07pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner by Robyn of the post title with $ signs as S's laid over a photo of world currency

    • OTW's ally organization, Public Knowledge, is sponsoring a contest for remixers. In an effort to highlight the problem of consolidation in the U.S. cable industry, they are asking remixers to "[t]ake one or more of the recent highly publicized customer service calls with Comcast (or go to town with one of your own experiences) and let your imagination go to work. We want to see remixes, mashups, autotunes, interpretive dances -- whatever you think of to broadcast these real customer service calls with Comcast." If you win, "Public Knowledge will pay your last Comcast bill, up to $200, and spread the word about your creation." Visit their post for more details.
    • OTW's Legal Committee recently submitted comments to the Australian government, opposing a copyright proposal, which has now been withdrawn. "'Unanimous' opposition to the federal government's proposed copyright law changes will force it back to the drawing board to tackle online piracy, Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull says. Representatives from both sides of the online piracy debate - including the telecommunications companies and rights holders - have warned the changes to copyright law outlined in the government's discussion paper on online piracy are too broad and could have negative unintended consequences."
    • A Viacom study of U.S. TV viewers was reported in numerous places. "The most interesting part of the research is what Viacom calls the 'Funnels to Fandom' – the process of becoming a fan, Viacom has found, takes place in five steps: Discovery, Research, Selection, Fandom, and Sharing." Fans have a strong influence since "in-person word of mouth is the #1 source for show discovery at 90%, closely followed by TV promos at 85% and word of mouth online or via social media at 78%." What's more, "[a]mong fans, marathoning is popular across all age groups: 83% of Millennials say this is one of their favorite ways to watch, followed by 72% of Gen Xers and 65% of Digital Natives."
    • Yahoo! Finance reported on the rapid aging of U.S. television viewers and what this could mean for programming. "Programmers will be increasingly willing to experiment with alternative distribution platforms for their content. With less risk of cannibalizing one’s core younger audience by offering shows on Netflix Inc., networks will try to cut deals to reach the mobile, 'time-shifting' viewer, wherever he or she can be found...we might see even more formulaic dramas and sitcoms, more pharmaceutical commercials and more older leading men and women in primetime, to better reflect the core viewing audience, rather than the sleeker, younger people who aren’t paying attention now anyway."

    What business stories have you seen that relate to fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Copyright threats and benefits

    Av Claudia Rebaza på lördagen, 19 april 2014 - 6:58pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner by Erin of a shield bearing the logos of several digital rights organizations.

    • The Asahi Shimbum detailed fan concerns about the TPP. "Usami and other creators of fan fiction, however, could face the possibility of legal prosecution as copyright violators in the future, depending on the outcome of TPP negotiations. Some countries are apparently demanding that Japan clamp down on knock-off and pirated works in the intellectual property arena, even if the copyright holder does not object to it. Under current Japanese copyright law, authorities take action only after the copyright holder, such as the artist of the original work or publisher, lodges a formal complaint."
    • India's Business Standard wrote about book piracy and its turn to crossover fiction. "By the 2000s, piracy had changed across all kinds of language publishing in India. In 2003, Harry Potter's publishers successfully sued Uttam Ghosh, preventing him from introducing a character called Jhontu in a sub-series where Harry Potter goes to Calcutta, a work of fan fiction if there ever was one...Book pirates in China had stayed ahead of the curve, by passing off a weird little book called Harry Potter and Bao Zoulong as a new Potter sequel. In this version, Harry Potter became a leading character in a translation of The Hobbit, with an explanatory paragraph to tell the reader how Harry Potter was turned into a hobbit one day while taking a bath."
    • The Wire explored the origin of The Office Time Machine. Creator Joe Sabia "wasn't really a fan of the show" but created it to "advocate for copyright reform and highlight the importance of fair use in protecting creators and their art."
    • Yet fair uses of content can be beneficial to creators. The Toronto Star discussed how music companies made more money from fan videos than official videos. “A lot of that is due to consumers putting more and more repertoire and new versions up there, but also it’s YouTube getting better at advertising" as now more than 50 countries are part of video ad monetization. "'It’s a massive growth area. We’re very excited about the creativity of consumers using our repertoire and creating their own versions of our videos,' said Francis Keeling, the global head of digital business for Universal Music Group."

    What copyright developments have you seen relating to fandom? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Events Calendar Post for April 2014

    Av Angela Nichols på tisdagen, 1 april 2014 - 10:59pm
    Meddelandetyp:


    Welcome to our Events Calendar roundup for the month of April! The Events Calendar can be found on the OTW website and is open to submissions by anyone with news of an event. These can be viewed by event-type, such as Academic Events, Fan Gatherings, Legal Events, OTW Events, or Technology Events taking place around the world.

    • This month, bring us fannish April showers by digging out those old zines, memories of past cons, archived personal webpages, tales of shipwars and fannish events, works on slowly-decaying archives, and more! Upload your old works to the AO3 and tell your tales on Fanlore.

      More about April Showers on Fanlore

    • 2014 Supanova Conventions are kicking off this April in Gold Coast April 4-6 and Melbourne April 11-13.

      Comic-con, Australian style! Supernova is where the adoring public comes face to face with Supa-Star celebrities and the creative talent that inspire their imaginary worlds under one big roof. The event includes comic books, animation, science-fiction, TV/movies, toys, gaming, fantasy, technology, books, internet sites and fan-clubs, the result is an amazing atmosphere tailor made for expressing your inner geek and where getting into cosplay is an obvious thing to do. Notable Guests at both events include Peter Mayhew, Lucy Lawless, Gethin Anthony, and many more!

      More about Supanova on Fanlore

    • International Quidditch Association World Cup VII the IQA’s championship tournament is an international event featuring the best 80 teams in the sport, held annually since 2007.Quidditch is a co-ed contact sport with a unique mix of elements from rugby, basketball, and dodgeball. A quidditch team is made up of seven athletes who play with brooms between their legs at all times. World Cup VII will be held on April 5-6, 2014, at the brand-new North Myrtle Beach Park and Sports Complex in North Myrtle Beach, SC.
    • Conglomeration 2014 is Louisville, Kentucky's own fan-run multimedia science fiction and fantasy convention and has been held off and on since 2001. This year the convention will take place April 11-13 2014. It includes an Art Show, Game Room, Dealer's Room, Masquerade and more and features various science fiction and fantasy authors and artists as guests of honor.
    • Keen to add your fannish memories to Fanlore but not sure where to start? Need your hand held as you make your first wiki edits? Or keen to share your skillz as an experienced Fanlore editor? On Saturday, 19 April, beginning at 20:00 UTC come to the Fanlore chatroom for The April Showers editing party on Fanlore. You'll be able to get help making your first forays into editing Fanlore, toss around ideas for new pages, and ask questions. Everyone is welcome!
    • OTW's Open Doors committee will be holding two public chats on the import of the Yuletide archives to the AO3. The first will be held on April 26, at 4pm UTC.

      More about Yuletide on Fanlore

    A Call for Papers this month comes from Anime and Manga Studies Symposium. Papers are welcome on all aspects of Japanese popular culture and the worldwide anime/manga fandom's activities and practices. Participants in the Symposium will be able to meet leading scholars at the Anime Expo convention in Los Angeles, CA, on July 3-6, contribute to the developing "anime and manga studies" community, present their work to an interested and appreciative audience, and interact directly with anime fans from around the world. Presentations on transformative works and cultures have always been welcome at the Symposium. Submit abstracts by May 1, 2014.

    This month we have also received a request for research participation from Dr Emerald King of the School of Languages and Cultures, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.

    The research results will be presented at the “Women and their Comics” symposium to be held at the Comix Home Base, Hong Kong in March 2014. Eventually the findings of the study will be used as the basis for a book project looking at costume in anime, manga and JRPGS.

    This study has been approved by the Victoria University of Wellington Human Ethics Committee and a consent form is available at the start of the survey, which can be accessed at the SurveyMonkey website.

    If you have any questions you may contact Emerald at +64 4 463 5293 during office hours: 9.00 am-4.30 pm (NZDT) Monday to Friday, or directly on +64 463 6467 during office hours: 10.00 am-6.00 pm (NZDT) Monday, Wednesday, Friday or via email: emerald.king [at] vuw.ac.nz

    If you have requests for research participation, please view our policy for inclusion at our website.


    The OTW encourages anyone to submit an event that's not already listed, and to check out the calendar throughout the year!

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