Entertainment Industries

  • OTW Fannews: Coming Attractions

    Av Claudia Rebaza på tisdagen, 12 januari 2016 - 5:18pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    A female figure dancing against a blue and pink sky 'OTW Fannews Coming Attractions'

    • Both the Wall Street Journal and The Global Times wrote about China's approach to fanworks and intellectual property. The Journal reported on Alibaba Pictures' plans to "no longer hire professional screenwriters. Instead it would gather material from online forums and fan fiction writers to compete with each other over screenwriting credit." Although screenwriters protested, others felt this was the wave of the future. "The rising demand for quality content with a built-in fanbase has driven up the price of such ideas in general, especially popular online fiction that is well-embraced by the country’s young generation."
    • The Times gave some background on the culture Alibaba planned to exploit. "An increasing number of Chinese IP owners are realizing the value of tongren authors - they are creative, enthusiastic and inexpensive. This year's hit TV series The Journey of Flower and The Legend of Langya were promoted using fan-made music. Journey to the West: Hero is Back produced official derivatives based on ideas submitted by fan designers. Many games, movies and TV series have also begun encouraging fans to create tongren works, even going so far as to hold competitions so they can discover talented authors and painters as well."
    • The Disruptive Competition Project hosted a post about what the Internet should look like in coming years. "Let’s start with Fandoms: they wouldn’t exist without platforms, and show why competing platforms give geeks what they want. Users naturally flock to the platform which best suits their particular fascination, and what the internet helps do is enable an level of intensity that simply couldn’t exist before." The EU wants to know more about users' needs. "They’ve launched a consultation — you have until the end of the year to respond — to 'better understand the social and economic role of platforms, market trends, the dynamics of platform-development and the various business models underpinning platforms.'”
    • Slate wrote about the stars of YouNow, dubbing it "the social network you’ve probably never heard of" and discussing the engagement of fans with its broadcasters. "'His supporters are on another level. I can’t even explain it'... Alex From Target, for instance, has seven times as many Twitter followers as Zach does. But when it comes to fan engagement—the number of RTs, likes, and comments the guys rack up, tweet for tweet—Zach’s metrics blow Alex out of the water. Zach’s fans are simply more obsessed. 'All these kids are getting crazy impressions,' Dooney says, and when they work together, 'it’s like the Power Rangers combining to become Megazord.'”

    Do you know about the next big thing in fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • The OTW Supports Fan Film Makers

    Av Sarah Remy på onsdagen, 6 januari 2016 - 5:23pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner by Diane with the outlines of a man and woman speaking with word bubbles, one of which has the OTW logo and the other which says 'OTW Announcement'

    In late December, 2015, Paramount and CBS sued the makers of Axanar, a Star Trek fan film that is intended to be professional quality and has been funded in significant part by Kickstarter and Indiegogo crowdfunding.

    The OTW has no relationship with Axanar or its makers, and we don’t know what the film will be like, so we can’t speak to the merits of this suit in particular. But we are troubled by much of Paramount’s Complaint, which we believe is based on a fundamental misunderstanding of fair use law. U.S. copyright law identifies several factors to consider in determining whether a new work based on a preexisting work is fair use, including (1) whether the new work transforms the meaning or purpose of the original, (2) whether the new work is noncommercial (that is, not made for profit), (3) how much of the original work the new work copies, and (4) whether the new work competes in the market with the original work.

    Fair use favors works that are noncommercial and not sold for a profit; that are transformative, adding new meaning or messages to the original; that are limited, not copying the entirety of the original; and that do not substitute for the original work. None of these factors is absolutely necessary for fair use, but they all help, and we believe that noncommercial fan films that use discrete elements from original works and add new meaning to them are precisely the kinds of works that the law should encourage. The fact that the hosting or creation of a work may be funded by one person, or crowdfunded by many people, doesn’t make the resulting work commercial. And the fact that a fanwork is high-quality or expensive to produce does not undermine the fact that it is fair use.

    We hope that copyright owners agree with us: fanworks often add to the markets for original copyrighted works, rather than competing with them. The OTW strongly believes that Paramount should be supporting the creators of noncommercial fan films, not threatening them.

    For more information on the OTW’s position on copyright, fanworks, and fair use, see the “Legal” section of the OTW FAQ. OTW Legal will continue to watch the progress of this lawsuit.

  • OTW Fannews: Crossing Boundaries

    Av Claudia Rebaza på tisdagen, 22 december 2015 - 3:52pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner by Diane of the post title in a hazy mist

    • Hypable reported on how a The 100 fanfic went viral in non-fanfic communities. "It’s absolutely hilarious to see how non-fandom has responded to this fictional argument, and how people have even taken sides — but the fact that Clarke was immediately assumed to be a male does say a lot about our heteronormative society, doesn’t it?! Despite this somewhat depressing factor, The 100 fans are having a blast with this, and are fully embracing the ridiculousness of #ClarketheHusband. We’ve never been more in love with this fandom."
    • Hypable also reported on a less happy example of a fanwork crossover, the appearance of yet another practitioner of the fanworks ambush stunt. "The segment started out fine, with Corden showing off brilliant, iconic pieces of artwork. But then… well. They start mocking fan art from artists who might have had less practice, or are younger. And Corden, especially, finds it all hilarious. And, sure. It’s amusing. Until you realize that there are people out there who drew them — and that these works are reproduced without consent or warning. The context of these pieces is stripped back; the smug hosts reduce them to a mockery, the butt of a joke. And these creators could be watching this show, without expectation, only to be accosted by unwarranted abuse."
    • Of course, the print media is increasingly moving in on RPF fandoms' turf by creating their own fanfic, focusing on anyone from local figures to politicians to celebrities.
    • Huffington Post pointed out how fandom's use of social media had made their interaction with celebrity family members ever more likely. "But perhaps the best use of social media is the ability to know her son is safe wherever he might be in the world, thanks to the hundreds of thousands of fans almost 'stalking' their every move. 'If they’re flying, I’ll do a search for “5SOS airport” and I’ll see they’ve landed and I’ll know they are safe...I would do that when I was looking after them too on tour, if they’d gone out on a particular night and I wanted to know if they’d come home to the hotel -- it would be on Twitter -- it’s kind of like they’ve got lots of little mums out there checking up on them.'"

    What have been examples, for better or worse, that you've seen on fandom and fanworks crossing boundaries? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Justifying the Drama

    Av thatwasjustadream på söndagen, 13 december 2015 - 5:38pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    a cartoon of one person speaking into another person's ear, with the words Justifying the Drama, OTW fannews written nearby

    • The Learned Fangirl wrote about the professionalization of fandom. "As we see more mainstream writing and academic study about the economies of fan culture and digital media, the ideas that Timberg presents here are worth revisiting. Communities of fan creators are more robust than ever before, and the semi-professionalization of fandom is more formalized than it has ever been, with clearly defined points of access and channels of distribution of creative work (cons, social media, podcasts, etc.). And if technology is the lifeblood of the creative class, allowing more rapid growth and implementation of ideas from different sources, then that doesn’t sound quite like a 'killing' to me."
    • The Columbia Chronicle posted about gender bias in fandom. “'People don’t think I’m mature because [WWE is] like fake wrestling and has a bunch of cheesy storylines, but I like it,' said Tutson, noting that she has about 40 action figures and 11 games and gets looked down upon because people do not typically expect an 18-year-old girl to collect wrestling action figures."
    • At ProWrestling.net, another writer complained about the reaction of wrestlers to critiques from their fans. "Coachman, like representatives of WWE frequently say, is using the 'it's about the fun' argument and instructing others to sit back and watch. WWE likes to say wrestling isn't meant to be deconstructed and thought deeply about. They like to paint a picture of an industry where the most important thing is smiles on faces. They like to ignore the call for responsible storytelling. "
    • Meanwhile Metro ran an opinion piece asking for celebrities to start intervening in fan attacks. "The more popular the icon the more power and influence they wield, but too often they are silent when it comes to acknowledging the dark side of their fandoms. Jessie J has finally taken responsibility for her fans, isn’t it time every other pop star does the same?"

    Drama? Fandom has plenty of it. Write about the events you've seen in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: From Sacred to Commercial

    Av Angela Nichols på måndagen, 30 november 2015 - 5:40pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    “Fromsacredtocommerical"

    • Places like Refinery29 are noticing the importance of what fans do. "Urrata, who is studying English lit, film, and women's studies, sees femslash (the fan-art romantic pairing of presumed-straight female characters) as a way to do 'what fan artists do best: attempt to close the gap between the media we are given and the media we want.' Like racebent casting (fans adding actors of color to movies and TV shows that lack diversity), Disney femslash is a way of taking action rather than simply discussing frustration over the lack of representation."
    • Chicagoist reported on an event with Carrie Brownstein in which she discussed the importance of fandom in her new memoir. "'My story starts with me as a fan,' she writes, 'And to be a fan is to know that loving trumps being beloved.' Hopper asked her to talk further about what being a fan has meant for her, and Brownstein credited being a music fan with giving her both stability and community, calling fandom itself 'sacred' with 'a desire to connect' at its heart."
    • She Knows interviewed author Christopher Rice about a planned m/m romance novel and noted "Thanks, in part, to the world of fan fiction, man-on-man action has become pretty popular with the female population. Not only are women reading it, but they're writing it. Rice isn't surprised. He said, 'It's a stereotype that men want to see two women roll around in a bubble bath, but oh, women don't want to see two men. The real fact is women may not want to see it, but they do want to read it.'"
    • Various outlets wrote about the planned Star Trek series, noting that CBS is counting on fans to make its new service successful. "Is this the 'killer app' for CBS All Access? It’s certainly required to get your name on the map. If there’s a property that can get folks to buy into a service, it’s either this or Star Wars at this point." CBS itself stated "We’ve experienced terrific growth for CBS All Access...We now have an incredible opportunity to accelerate this growth with the iconic Star Trek, and its devoted and passionate fan base, as our first original series.”

    How have you noticed the importance of fan activities? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: What's in a Name?

    Av Claudia Rebaza på torsdagen, 19 november 2015 - 5:47pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner by Sidhrat reading 'OTW Fannews What's in a Name

    • The New Statesman weighed in on an important discussion as fanworks become more well known: what actually counts as one? "It comes down, as it often does, to money. Because money, and a lack of it, is at the heart of long-held tensions about fanworks. Fanfiction is overwhelmingly the product of unpaid labour, millions and millions of words given freely, whether for legal reasons or community norms. Because it isn’t compensated – and because it is so often done by women it is devalued, as an art form and as a way to spend one’s time. When money is added to the mix, whether in giant pull-to-publish book deals or, increasingly, fanfiction contests and authors sponsored by television networks and Hollywood studios, the place that fanworks occupy in the vast sphere of adaptation and reworking begins to shift. And not always for the better."
    • The confusion about what counts is understandable given the visibility of commercial works that either tell the stories of fans, that do similar work, or even co-opt the terms to market a product from commercial authors. What's promising is the increasing focus on available fanwork, especially when it provides a way to show audience response to a current event or topic of interest.
    • The visibility of fanworks means that its features and practices have been inspiring commercial creators and industries, whether it's to blend fanwork with their own work; to take popular genres more seriously; to respond to users' wishes about how they want to interact with stories; or to create works about them.
    • The transformative nature of fanworks is an important element in its legal protection but this is often overlooked or misunderstood by the media, even while examples of its commentary on commercial entertainment are easily found. One recent example is a fan edit focusing on Pulp Fiction and Breaking Bad. The need to educate others about what fanworks makes the effort of fans to do so all the more important.

    Do you think it's important for fans to explain their own practices and communities? That's what Fanlore is all about. Contributions are welcome from all fans so create an account there and share your knowledge.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: No Place to Hide

    Av thatwasjustadream på söndagen, 15 november 2015 - 5:23pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    a background image of many products from famous consumer brands, with icons suggesting a video player over the top of them all and the words OTW Fannews No Place to Hide next to the play button

    • AdNews discussed the use of YouTube fandoms as a marketing bonanza. "The quality of talent on display, and the reaction of fans got the point across about the premium content YouTube has to offer...Stuart Bailey, chief digital officer at OMD Australia, believes that, 'long gone are the days when clients would associate YouTube with skateboarding cats and other such content. It now has content credential in spades. Google certainly flexed their ‘influencer’ muscles and showed that some of their YouTube talent are stars in their own right, with engaged and loyal audiences - some queuing from 6am to catch a peek of their favourite YouTube stars,' Bailey said. 'The trick will be how to tap into that talent to not only communicate with a brand’s customers and consumers but to add value and customised experiences.'"
    • Comic Book Bin asked whether fan films should be crowdsourced. "I believe that copyrights holders should be tolerant of fan films and fan fiction but to a limit. When fan fiction and fan film creators earn money from the unlicensed properties they exploit, that is a problem. More than voluntarily breaching the rights of copyrights owners, they earn revenues from properties they have no right to exploit. If you want to make a Batman film, do it on your own, bear all the costs. Use it as a portfolio piece. But to go out of your way to ask people to fund your Batman film is wrong. You don’t own Batman."
    • MTV.com spoke glowingly about erotic fanfiction competitions and noted it's an expanding business. "If you’re not in San Francisco or New York, you can still observe the NSFW madness from afar. Shipwreck also has a regular podcast where they post recordings of their live show, as well as a Tumblr where you can read previous works — and last night they just announced they’ll be publishing a book sometime next year."
    • QSR promoted a Dairy Queen competition for fans. "Along with a new television advertising campaign dedicated entirely to Fans, both the Random Acts of Fandom Giveaway and the ad campaign showcase a wide variety of DQ Fans professing love for their favorite people, places, and things including vintage cars and the perfect nature hideout."

    What efforts to tap the fandom market have you been seeing? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Big Business Selfies

    Av Janita Burgess på söndagen, 25 oktober 2015 - 4:32pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    OTW Fannews banner with the text Big Business Selfies against a background of stacked silver coins

    • Here and Now did a segment on how important the Twilight film had become to the economy of the town it's set in. Focusing on the 10th anniversary celebration of Twilight's publication, the segment interviews citizens of Forks, Washington and discusses the events taking place. (No transcript available)
    • At Publishing Technology the economic impact of fanfiction is in focus. "[T]he way that fan fiction takes a piece of Intellectual Property and chops it up, plays with it and distributes it over multiple networks and media...is a very pure expression of the kind of creative approach to content exploitation that we at Publishing Technology have been talking to publishers about for a very long time. The possibilities opened up by digital media mean that the book is often only the beginning of the commercial life of a piece of IP. Yet it still remains the only focus of many publishers, who find it conceptually and practically difficult to unbundle the book and sell it as chapters, or a serial, or even a content marketing campaign paid for by a brand advertiser. The book is treated as the end-product of the publishing process, when it could be just the beginning."
    • Film School Rejects discussed how fandom documentaries are becoming a form of fandom selfie. "Other than that, Ghostheads doesn’t seem to have much of a reason to exist. Like too many other fandom docs, it’s not likely to reach or be appealing to the millions of non-extreme fans let alone total outsiders. It will tell a number of hardcore Ghostbusters fans things they already know about themselves and their beloved movie...I also wouldn’t be surprised if the studios start encouraging, maybe even secretly contributing to the crowdfunding of docs that in turn foster and support fans and enthusiasm for their upcoming slates. If nothing else, they might later on be cheap pickups to throw onto their Blu-ray releases of the original or new version of their respective properties."
    • Alaska Dispatch News mapped the growth of Senshi con "from [a school] cafeteria to UAA and in recent years mushrooming into an expansive convention housed in the Egan Center. Now celebrating its 10th anniversary, Bundick and other organizers are expecting more than 4,000 attendees, and Alaska Business Monthly is predicting it will produce an economic impact of $191,000" with the growth likely to continue. Its organizer said “We’re still getting [vendor and artist] applications for this year. This is the first time we’ve had a waiting list...Local people and businesses are wanting to get in on it."

    What sorts of economic and business growth have you seen tied to fandom? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Commercial Opportunities

    Av Sarah Remy på torsdagen, 15 oktober 2015 - 4:25pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    fannews banner showing pennies and dimes on a black background, commercial opportunities written overtop

    • Airlock Alpha posted Ann Morris' discussion of What Mainstreaming Of Fandom Has Done For Me. Namedropping the OTW's Fanlore, she notes that tech advances have helped her follow her fannish interests despite having low vision problems. "I have low vision, and it used to be super annoying to go to the library and try to find large-print science-fiction books. The people who published large-print books didn’t seem to think that anyone with low vision would be interested in those weirdo books with the rocket ship on the spine. Here’s a pet peeve which is fortunately a thing of the past. The Science Fiction Book Club and the Large Print Book Club were owned by the same company. And yet, they did not publish any science-fiction books in large print. Augh!"
    • At MTV.com Taylor Trudon thanks the makers of Almost Famous for being able to see herself on screen. "When adults don’t take the ideas, passions and dreams of fangirls seriously, they’re missing out. They’re missing out on finding possible solutions to major social problems. They’re missing out on the opportunity to ask important questions. They’re missing out on the chance to view the world through a different lens and in doing so, are missing the voices that have the potential to change it."
    • At Popzette Tom Smithyman looked at how fannish activity is driving the growth of crowdfunding. "'We’re making the ‘Star Trek’ that we all want to see,' Peters told a crowd at the San Diego Comic-Con. And, judging from fans’ response, Peters is correct. An initial Kickstarter campaign netted more than $100,000, and led to a second initiative, which raised more than $600,000. It also sparked a competition among the crowdfunding sites to house the second. The campaign has since moved to Indiegogo, where it has raised an additional $525,000."
    • Autostraddle's Fan Fiction Friday column is expanding because "fandom is more powerful than ever...And because money makes people in charge pay attention, and social media makes our voices hard to ignore, the folks who make TV are listening and responding to us, both on-air and in real life...starting this week, Fan Fiction Friday will...include fan fiction recommendations, of course, but it will now also offer you news round-ups about fan culture, interviews with fic writers and TV writers and TV recappers and TV directors, mini-essays about fandom from people in fandom, polls, discussion questions, infographics, advice about harnessing the power of fandom to affect real change, and a grab bag where I answer questions people have been asking me."

    What commercial opportunities have you seen opening up because of fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Merging Into Literature

    Av thatwasjustadream på söndagen, 27 september 2015 - 5:44pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    image of books stacked in a small pile with the words OTW Fannews next to them

      Fanfiction discussions continue to crop up alongside other discussions of literature. Montana's Missoula Independent promoted a fanfiction reading by pro writers at a book festival. Meanwhile, an Italian literary festival had a session on fanfiction writing. "Traditionally ignored by the publishing and media industries, fanfiction has been referred to as the refuge of frustrated aspiring writers...The subject is more articulated however, because it touches upon - and includes - literature criticism, copyright, cultural influences, social constructs, and it can't ignore the changes happening in the publishing industry. It's an ongoing conversation that involves an ever growing number of authors, scholars, fans and readers."

    • Not mentioned there but referenced in various other places discussing the new Millennium series novel, was that original fiction increasingly crosses over into fanfiction. "From the reviews and what I’ve read so far, The Girl In the Spider’s Web is a very competent and perfectly entertaining act of literary mimicry, recreating the feel of the characters and the world of the first three books as well as the technothriller procedural plots. But the question is, is there more than that to it? Does it have Larsson’s undertone of political anger and activism against injustice, misogyny and corruption, or is it just a fun pulp romp for the beach? Is it more than just fan fiction? Is that all the fans want? How does it feel to read this knowing that had he lived, Larsson would almost certainly have written a fourth book completely differently?"
    • A post in the Nevada Daily Mail about a local creative writing group discussed fanfiction as an option for writers. "[I]t can be a fun distraction from one's professional writing. And a distraction from your regular writing is one of the problems with fan-fiction! Still, if you have a favorite show, movie, character, etc., that you want to create a new story about, do a search for that one interest and fan-fiction about it. I'm sure you'll find lots of reading."
    • A discussion in Variety with Bryan Fuller touched on the lapse of canon into fanfiction, even when it's being written by its creator. "I feel like it was a unique experience of myself as a fannibal, writing the show as I imagined it — it was my fan fiction — and then sharing it with other fan fiction writers who then elaborated on it in their own ways. It was a wonderful communal experience. I’ve never had a show in the thick of the Twitterverse like I did with 'Hannibal,' and it was a really fantastic, exciting experience, and hopefully one we’ll be able to repeat on 'American Gods.'"

    How have you seen fanfiction merging into literary and canon worlds? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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