Sports

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom in Motion

    Av Claudia Rebaza på tisdagen, 8 december 2015 - 4:33pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner by Soy Alex of OTW logos inside a curled film strip reading 'Fandom in Motion'

    • MoviePilot.com looked at how the rapid appearance of Linkle fan art made a statement about her acceptance within the fandom. "When Linkle was first announced as a new character for the upcoming Hyrule Warriors: Legends game, the internet went crazy. Some loved her, some hated her. The debate is still going strong and will probably not end any time soon...and several people have already drawn their own version of Linkle. I have scavenged the internet and collected the best fan-art I could find for you to feast your eyes upon."
    • Yibada.com put a spotlight on a Dragon Ball Z fan film. "If you're looking for a darker and more realistic version of Dragon Ball Z then this fan-made live action flick is for you. A group of European fans produced the almost 30-minute 'Dragon Ball Z: The Fall of Men' and it will blow your mind." The film "features Trunks and is set in the future. It is inspired by the characters in the Dragon Ball saga. It also pays tribute to the iconic universe that Toriyama created."
    • A.V. Club wrote about a LEGO stop motion fan film. "Captain America finds himself in a town overrun by Nazi zombies and must fight his way through the horde, and soon finds himself entangled with other characters from the Marvel Cinematic Universe. It’s an exciting short that displays real talent in the stop-motion medium as Whaley uses lighting, music, and impressive poses for the characters to create an incredibly gory but fun short film that is as brutal as it is entertaining."
    • The Hockey Writers discussed a fan who had turned her very fannishness into a tradable product. Kat Velez no longer felt comfortable supporting her team, the Chicago Blackhawks. "So, Velez decided to sell her fandom to support the fight against domestic violence. A fan of any team from any hockey league can donate to have Velez root for their team. At the end of the week whoever donates the most money will get to choose the team Velez roots for the next week. Yes, even if you are a fan of the Australian Ice Hockey League...she will root for you, as long as she has access to a live stream of the game."

    What fanworks do you think should be remembered? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Improve Your Life

    Av Kiri Van Santen på tisdagen, 24 november 2015 - 6:13pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    banner by SoyAlex of a bicycle with the OTW logo as the wheels

    • The American Library's Association's Center for the Future of Libraries has a mission which involves identifying "emerging trends relevant to libraries and the communities they serve." Included in their trends is an entry on fandom. In the "Why It Matters" section, they write "As cultural institutions that preserve and provide access to books, video, music, and an increasing array of media, fandoms may be obvious partners in promoting literacy, engagement with culture, and media creation. Fandom increasingly assumes active creation – writing, recording, drawing, remixing, role-playing – rather than just passive consumption of media. This could make it an important space for libraries to design programming and instruction around, especially in ways that promote Connected Learning that is highly social, interest-driven, hands-on, and production oriented."
    • Two different sites promoted fandom involvement as a way to stay healthy. The University of Utah's Health Feed focused on sports fandom while Inverse expanded it to include media fandom. The fandom benefits cited were a sense of belonging, greater happiness, and an increase in critical thinking.
    • Bringing your fandom into the workplace can be problematic, though, depending on your profession. Gawker was among those criticizing a BuzzFeed reporter for a lack of objectivity. "[T]he Buzzfeed Brand is built in large part on explicit and outspoken fandom. But the News side at BuzzFeed works as seriously as as traditional newsroom, and has put into place ethical guidelines to cement that... It’s hard to imagine how these guidelines jibe with teary-eyed fandom for the Pope, an elected political entity with a broad swath of deeply political views that include (a longstanding opposition to) women’s rights and LGBT equality." They concluded by noting that "pure, uncritical adoration goes beyond the usual biases, and makes a reporter seem incapable of grappling with the complexity of her subject... This isn’t a Foo Fighters fan interviewing Dave Grohl."
    • Death and Taxes revealed that Dave Grohl is equally likely to have his fandom on display if Jonathan Davis is any example. "Probably the biggest thing Davis and I have in common is an all-consuming love for Duran Duran. The big difference being that Davis got to actually connect with his musical idol Simon Le Bon... 'I was shaking, because I’m the hugest fan. He was like, 'How old are you? Name some songs.' And I was like '"The Chauffeur" is my shit. I love that song.' We just hit it off and started hanging out that night. And then a couple years later my agent brought him out. He came to the Korn show, and then we went out to this pizza place in London, and we hung out all night and it was the greatest night of my life.'"

    What was the greatest fandom day of your life? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Creating & Remembering Fans

    Av Pip Janssen på onsdagen, 21 oktober 2015 - 4:47pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    A TV on a red striped background with the words OTW Fannews

    • Slate wrote about the University of Iowa's Hevelin Collection of fanzines, quoting the OTW's Karen Hellekson who wrote "fanzines were typically self-published pamphlets, made from 'stapled-together pieces of ordinary-sized letter paper, sometimes folded in half.' Fans would exchange these documents through the mail, often after discovering one another through the letters pages of magazines such as Amazing Stories...According to Hellekson, in those pre-photocopying days authors of zines would reproduce their work via carbon paper, mimeograph, or other similarly primitive means."
    • Texas A&M University now hosts The Sandy Hereld Memorial Digitized Media Fanzine Collection in remembrance of the OTW supporter Sandy Herrold. "Sandy’s legacy of work includes the founding of Virgule-L, the first Internet slash mailing list, hosting numerous other mailing lists and fan sites, and helping to create the annual 'Vid Review' panel at the Escapade convention (the longest-running slash fan convention), which became the model for serious conversations about vidding as an art form."
    • The Mary Sue discussed the difficulties in passing on fandom. "Sailor Moon was something we were really looking forward to sharing with our son. I knew that Usagi’s outfits, transformations, and quirky sensibilities would be right up his alley!...Within 3 episodes, I was horrified and questioning everything I ever knew about my love of the series. When all was said and done, we made it only 6 episodes in before I tragically put an end to it, completely taken aback. These girls were so vain, and her superpowers were triggered by a magical makeup mirror? I was right about my son, though: He was hooked."
    • Netflix released a study exploring when people became fans of a TV show. "While around the world the hooked episode was relatively consistent, slight geographic differences did present themselves. The Dutch, for instance, tend to fall in love with series the fastest, getting hooked one episode ahead of most countries irrespective of the show. Germans showed early fandom for Arrow whereas France fell first for How I Met Your Mother. In Better Call Saul, Jimmy McGill won Brazilians over one episode quicker than Mexicans. And Down Under, viewers prove to hold out longer across the board, with members in Australia and New Zealand getting hooked one to two episodes later than the rest of the world on almost every show."
    • WBUR had a segment where a couple tried to see if they could become baseball fans. "A change had come over Susie. Over the course of a few hours, she’d become a Cubs fan for life. In those same few hours, Kris Bryant had singlehandedly undermined our relationship. Just kidding. But as we headed home, even I, the longtime sports cynic, had to admit — that was incredible. It’s hard not to get caught up in the thrill of a dramatic win at home. But at the same time, I wondered if I should resent the Cubs for winning? Because I didn’t. And maybe that made me less of a Sox fan?"

    What fans do you want remembered for their contributions to fandom? Start a page for them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Defying Expectations

    Av Claudia Rebaza på torsdagen, 10 september 2015 - 3:01pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner by Elena of a globe surrounding by smiling female faces with the title 'OTW Fannews: Defying Expectations'

    • Fandoms have a variety of problematic behaviors, including how women's participation is welcomed. Sports marketer Amanda Curry complained about the nature of some efforts to reach out to female fans. "Despite their attempts to empower female fans, creating a program that perpetuates the stereotype that women know nothing about sports only further de-legitimizes the vast majority of us that do. Dumbing down sports for women not only makes us feel bad, but it allows others consistently treat us like we're dumb. This makes it harder to gain respect as a fan, and in my case, as a professional in the sports world...I am a female who works in the sports industry, and I know how it feels to have my opinion rejected just because I’m a woman."
    • CNN reported on the reaction of Star Wars fans to the bullying of a girl who loved displaying her fandom. "At this new school Layla started coming home more quiet and less of herself, and started asking not to wear her shirts or R2-D2 jacket" her mother said. "The girls in school were telling her she shouldn't like 'Star Wars' because it's for boys." However, after other fans began sending her gifts and messages of support, her enthusiasm returned. "Layla now feels loved and accepted in her stormtrooper uniform, and recently got a chance to meet one of her heroes, Weird Al Yankovic, who has two 'Star Wars' parodies in his repertoire. An added bonus...is that Layla enjoys surprising people who expect to see a boy behind the stormtrooper mask."
    • Henry Jenkins was recently honored by the Science Fiction Researchers Association and used the opportunity to discuss fandom's history when it comes to diversity. "Those of us who pioneered fandom studies too often bracketed race and class in order to focus on gender, sexuality, and generation. As we sought to validate forms of cultural production and experience that were meaningful to us, we neglected the fact that our own ranks were still too narrowly constituted and that there was more we should have done to validate forms of culture that were meaningful to a more diverse population. However much we might have sometimes felt like outcasts in our own lives, we were still in a privileged position to help inform what kinds of cultural production and reception mattered in an academic context."

    How have you seen fans defying expectations? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Keepers of the Flame

    Av Sarah Remy på fredagen, 21 augusti 2015 - 4:02pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    OTW Fannews Banner title in red with envelope icon

    • At Nerd Reactor Genevieve LeBlanc wrote about the joy of fandom. "It was Simon Pegg that said that being a geek was 'a license to proudly emote on a somewhat childish level rather than behave like a supposed adult. Being a geek is extremely liberating.' For me, it means I have the ability to take joy from small moments like these. The happiness is disproportional to the actual significance of the event; I got immense entertainment with friends about two Coke bottles sharing names with fictional characters. It’s absolutely meaningless, but being a nerd means that it gets to make me happy. And who can deny the benefit of a little extra happiness in our lives?"
    • At ESPN CricInfo Ahmer Naqvi took a thoughtful look at what fan activities consist of. "The realisation coincided with a time in my life when I was experiencing and learning to enjoy so much more that the world had to offer...suddenly everything in cricket (other than perhaps an India-Pakistan game) was expendable in a way it hadn't been before. And it is then that a part of me could finally accept, and be even confident of the fact, that not adhering to the rituals I had made up in my head didn't mean that I didn't love the game. Because eventually it wasn't about what I needed to prove to others but about what it gave to me."
    • At Noisey, Luke Winkie took a look back at the relevance of Wizard Rock. "There are still some wizard rock bands propping up the scene—hiding out in ancient Myspaces or hidden Bandcamps. But none are quite as active or in-demand like Harry and the Potters...It didn’t matter who you were, you could always relate to someone about Hogwarts. It’s hard to find stuff like that in adulthood. The fandom has dissipated in popular culture, so you’re forced to keep it alive in your head. It makes Harry and the Potters a nostalgia act, to a certain extent—expected from a band that’s only put out two new songs in the last five years. 'People come to our shows to reconnect to that ‘midnight release party’ vibe,' says Paul DeGeorge. 'It conjures a lot of those feelings that haven’t been exercised in years.'”
    • The Orlando Weekly took note of a planned fanfiction reading. "Love it or hate it, fan fiction has become one of the most popular literary forms of the 21st century. Hordes of scribblers of wildly varying talent regularly post hundreds of thousands of unauthorized expansions of various fandoms to sites like AO3 or FanFiction.net. Some fanfic writers even get published after doing a search-and-replace of proper nouns and we all suffer for it (*cough*Fifty Shades*cough*). So of course local literary kingpins Jesse Bradley of There Will Be Words and John King of 'The Drunken Odyssey' have teamed up to, uh, celebrate the genre."

    What have you seen that best expresses the love of fandoms? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Similar to Fanfic

    Av Claudia Rebaza på torsdagen, 9 juli 2015 - 3:30pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner by Kat of multiple typewriters with the sheet in one reading 'OTW Fannews: Similar to Fanfic'

    • An article in The Telegraph discussed how fan speculation in sports fandom is a form of fanfic. "At the heart of fan fiction’s appeal is a sort of wish fulfilment: a subtle remaking of the world in which one’s wildest fantasies can gush uncontrollably to the surface. And while a good deal of fan fiction is sexual in nature, much of it is just quite sweet: charming teenage reveries that begin with a single pleasant idea – 'wouldn’t it be nice if'...In a fortnight's time we see the opening of the transfer window, and yet despite the two being ostensibly unrelated, it strikes me that there are certain similarities between the millions of stories that teenage girls tell each other on Tumblr, and the millions of stories that football will tell itself over the next three months. For the reopening of the summer window marks the ceremonial point at which football subtly shifts in character: from a real game played on the pitch, to a fantasy enacted largely in the imagination."
    • Salon discussed the focus on women in the new season of Halt and Catch Fire. "This season...has an exuberance the first season struggled to reach, and it’s because of a storytelling device that has more popularity in fan fiction archives than Hollywood studios: the gender swap. It’s a thought experiment that pops up in fervent fandoms, ones that are also eagerly reimagining beloved characters in different settings or with new adventures...As with so many elements of fandom, it’s casually subversive—a re-creation that grapples with the social construction of gender and imagines its infinite fluidity. And as with so many elements of fandom, it is a long-standing tradition—one that Shakespeare made regular use of in his plays, which itself was a commentary on the fact that all the female roles were played by men."
    • A guest post in The Japan News explained cover dancing which "is a fun activity in which teams of dancers emulate the moves of Japanese or South Korean idols as they dance to the original music. Spectators cheer for them as if they were the real deal. While cover dancing is gaining more and more fans in Japan, I’ve often met fans in Thailand, Hong Kong and nearby areas, as well as in the United States and Latin America. I think cover dancing is similar to fan fiction for anime and manga in dojin culture, in which fans create their own works using popular manga and anime characters."
    • An article at The Guardian discussed academic analyses of fan activities on Frozen. "Fan responses have boomed on the internet and given rise to myriad readings. In fact, academia now lags behind fans when it comes to subjecting popular culture to intense analysis. The online debate about, say, Mad Men could sustain a conference for weeks. 'Fan studies talks about how carefully and critically audiences discuss texts...The internet has made fan responses so much more mainstream and accessible.' In the past, she says, you would need to do focus groups to yield similar information. 'I think the way in which it’s been really popular with traditionally marginalised communities is specific to Elsa’s characterisation...It can resonate with people who have been ostracised or stigmatised.'”

    What things have you seen compared to fanfiction? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages!

  • OTW Fannews: Securing a Place

    Av Janita Burgess på onsdagen, 10 juni 2015 - 4:26pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner by Sidhrat in black white and red with an image of a padlock and the text OTW Fannews Securing a Place

    • Rocket News 24 posted about a fan anime film launched after a year of work. "YouTube user azuresakuga is a non-Japanese otaku with a passion for animating. He’s spent the last year working on a short animation of his own, combining all of his favorite anime characters into one all-star marathon. Ever since he shared it with the world, Japanese otaku have been praising it all over, and once you see it too, you’ll probably do the same."
    • Bleeding Cool wrote about the Machinima Event in NYC. "Chief Revenue Officer, Jamie Weissenborn took the stage to talk about who the 'audience' is for Machinima, and described them as being ethnically diverse, 'slightly more male' and having a 'higher household median income' than many other networks. He shared that Machinima content has a 97% 'like' rating, and used the example of the Halo: Nightfall launch featuring a fan art contest which went into 'overdrive' in page impressions. Crossing DC Entertainment with Machinima, Geoff Johns was introduced by video to talk about The Hero Project from DC. This is a new competition that will bring contestants to 'secure a place' in the DC Universe with props, and visual effects provided for them to make their own shows, it seems. The goal is to produce a 'live-action short video based on their own interpretations of characters from DC Comics’ Starman comic book series'."
    • Disney's Star Wars site interviewed art teacher George Folz, the creator of 'Darth Days'. "I’d been drawing almost exclusively with a pen for a couple of years, and something about creating ink drawings of him with a fat brush was just pure bliss. As comics are my bag, and I was looking for a personal project outside of The Roman Nose, I got the idea that I’d recreate a Darth Vader scene from the original trilogy every day of 2015."
    • A post at Union and Blue speculated on Fandom: Why Do We Care About This Nonsense?. "Many of us grew up with sports, like a one sided long distance family member, who is always there but our interaction is minimal. And when we finally get that in person experience, it evolves like a vacation far more magical than anything we feel past our teenage years. We love, we love, we care, we root...But there’s always a buffer...It’s that safe distance of caring and admiration that makes sports the ultimate getaway. You can still engage, you can still care, but even at it’s darkest days, it doesn’t devastate you the way life can."

    What amazing fanwork have you seen recently? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Judging Women's Fandoms

    Av .Kelly Ribeiro på fredagen, 24 april 2015 - 5:15pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Womens Fandoms

    • The Global Times of China speculated about the appeal of Mary Sue stories. One reader responded "The reason I like reading and watching Mary Sue stories is because I can be swept away by the beautiful romantic relationships...The heroine doesn't stick to one man, and no one blames her." Her first experience with Mary Sues was in "a piece of fan fiction set in the world of Slam Dunk, a popular Japanese manga comic about a high school basketball team that was adapted into an animation series in 1993. 'The Mary Sue character was the same age as me, and had a similar mentality to life as me, so I was able to perfectly identify with her...[Reading it] was as if I was in the cartoon world myself, and having these romantic relationships with the handsome basketball players.'"
    • At The New Statesman Elizabeth Minkel pointed out that the very same behavior lacked commentary when it was by men but not when it was by teenage girls, or indeed women in general. "Drop into any Top Gear thread online right now and...there’s a genuine outpouring of emotion for the Top Gear that was: these fans, mostly (grown) men, are offering up their vulnerabilities, talking about how the show was always there for them - a comfort, something to look forward to every week...Drop into any 1D thread right now and you’ll notice that even though the language is different, maybe even incomprehensible to you, the sentiment is the same: these fans, mostly (underage) teenage girls, have flooded social media with that same outpouring of emotion, for Malik’s departure or for the end of the group as it’s always existed. It should be easy to have compassion for people who love something and lose it."
    • At The Conversation the focus was on female fans of Australian football. "Our research debunks a couple of persistent myths about women sport fans. These myths concern women’s motivation for attending football, which is commonly explained in terms of their duties as mothers (women support football because it is a 'family' game), or dismissed as something that women do mainly because the men in their life are into footy. These assumptions about why women follow football reinforce some particularly stubborn gender stereotypes." Instead, the study "reveals that while family features significantly in the way women become fans – overwhelmingly women are socialised into following a team through their parents – they develop a connection with and enjoyment of AFL that prevails independently of family."

    Where has the line been drawn between men and women in fan reaction and support? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Asking for Fan Rights

    Av Janita Burgess på torsdagen, 12 februari 2015 - 5:30pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    OTW Fannews Banner featuring a picture of a gavel and text that reads 'OTW Fannews: Asking for Fan Rights'

    • A Tech Dirt post directed attention to the Internet Archive's release of over 2,000 MS-DOS video games, playable in the browser. "What I found truly amazing was that with every excited Twitter or Facebook comment I saw, it was about a different game...Each person seemed to latch onto their own moment in history." But the "Internet Archive is allowed to do this kind of thing...because it was lucky enough to get one of the semi-arbitrary DMCA triennial review exemptions that lets them break old DRM for the purpose of archiving vintage software. But, even then, it's not entirely clear that what the Internet Archive is doing is fully protected today."
    • Slate interviewed Lacey Noonan, the author of a humor RPF story about a U.S. football player. She was asked, "You’ve also written a story that features an encounter between Flo from Progressive, Wendy from Wendy’s, and Jan from Toyota... Are you drawn to characters that aren’t typically seen as particularly sexual?" Noonan: "Definitely. I believe all three of those women are talented actors, but yeah ... not your normal fare. I think it's a writer's responsibility to throw light on the dark corners. It's also a kind of reaction to the blunt ubiquity of American culture. Like, if it's going to be in my face 24/7, then I'm going to have a reaction to it, and I should."
    • The Boston Globe later wrote about Noonan's book being pulled from Amazon for trademark violations. The reason was "the book jacket, specifically the photo of Gronkowski that features the 'MHK' patch on his uniform" though whether it was a demand by the National Football League or his team, the New England Patriots, wasn't clear.
    • Meanwhile the Patriots' opponents in the Superbowl were attempting a number of trademark grabs. "The Seahawks’ aggressive quest for new revenue has led both the NBA and the NHL to try to slow one of the trademark applications. And while Seattle’s owners were once sued over the use of '12th Man,' the team is now trying to seize control of many other variations of the term. In the process, the Seahawks organization has battled fans, local businesses and even a former player... 'They’ve always been a little aggressive about securing intellectual property for themselves,' said Andresen, who has worked with other professional franchises. 'They’ve really taken the position that the more intellectual property, the better.'"

    Where have you seen fans standing up for their rights? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Running the Gamut

    Av Claudia Rebaza på fredagen, 30 januari 2015 - 5:11pm
    Meddelandetyp:

    Banner by Alice of with the words 'OTW Fannews: Running the Gamut' with Gamut centered in a tablet, and a quill pen writing the top line in black and a paintbrush writing the bottom line in red.

    • GamaSutra presented a roundup of videogame criticism "on topics ranging from the 'ludocentrism' of games discourse to a different take on Eric Zimmerman's 'Ludic Century.'" The roundup of videogame blogging included a look at German gaming blogs, and a blog post by Maggie Greene that compares "Tales of Xillia to Chinese literary traditions. Specifically, she looks at multiple endings and the effort to capture both tragic compromise and fairy tale and fan-fiction happiness ever-after."
    • Hoodline wrote about a bookstore's book fanfiction with local authors. "We pick a book every month, either one that we just love and is classic, or is just in the zeitgeist for whatever reason, and we assign each writer a character—they don’t get to pick. And then they write 800-1200 words of fan fiction about that character, or heavily featuring them or centered around them. They can do anything they want. Whoever wins gets to come back. The structure of the show is that there are six readers total, and they’re all read by our 'thespian in residence,'...and the audience gets to vote."
    • At The Guardian, Katie Welsh posted about the best vlog reinventions of classic books. "[F]resh-faced teens and twentysomethings aren’t only vlogging about their own lives; they’re dressing up as fictional characters and telling modern reworkings of familiar stories into their webcams as YouTube adaptations of classic novels go viral. The teams behind them may be professional actors or simply fans of the books, and the quality of both scripts and production can vary, but at their best they could give the BBC a run for its money."
    • The Otago Daily Times published a piece on cosplaying runners at Disney. "'I love the atmosphere,' said Lauren Harrell, 27, after she finished the November super heroes race in a hand-painted T-shirt and foam headpiece as Groot, the human-like tree in Disney's Marvel Studios film Guardians of the Galaxy. 'People are cheering you every step of the way. And nobody judges you for dressing in costume,' said Harrell, who had a speaker attached to her waist so she could dance and sing to the Guardians soundtrack." Other half marathons include Disney Princess or Tinker Bell themes.

    How far and wide have you seen fandom activities? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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