News of Note

  • OTW Fannews: Living with fanfiction

    By Claudia Rebaza on Wednesday, 20 February 2013 - 7:30pm
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    • An article from the Oakland Tribune provided a good exploration of fanfiction and the activities of people who write it. "The online communities -- fandoms -- are vast and develop their own guidelines, techniques and even vocabularies. People write about, talk about, have mini conventions about, make videos about and even edit each other's stories about everything from favorite novels, TV shows and comic books to Japanese anime and mangas, poems, video games or popular songs...'It's really big, it's really diverse, and if you've only seen one little slice of it, you haven't seen anything.'" The piece also featured discussion with OTW Legal Chair Betsy Rosenblatt, and mentions OTW projects the AO3 and Fanlore.
    • Meanwhile Transformative Works and Cultures editor Karen Hellekson discussed how varied fanfiction can be in The Eye. "'Although I’m glad that Fifty Shades of Grey has caused interest in the fan fiction phenomenon, I also worry that the prurient, overtly sexual, often violent nature of the text reflects badly on fan fiction in general, because it’s not representative of fan fiction or the impetus to write it.' Fans are inspired to write fiction in order to continue experiencing a text, its characters, and settings. Often, they write for themselves and for fellow fans, with no pretensions of achieving fame comparable to their source texts’ authors. Fan fiction’s forays into the worlds of publishing and academia, however, show that it is a broader cultural phenomenon that appeals to more than the fans alone."
    • In a review of Batman comics on PopMatters, Michael D. Stewart talks about how uncertain canons can make all stories seem like fanfiction. "Many of the writers currently writing our major superheroes are fans of the characters. They’re not the original creators of the character, so what’s the difference between fan fiction and what is being published today? Sophistication? Editorial endorsement and inclusion in canon? A paycheck?...[I]n terms of the culture talking to them and they responding in its language, “Death of the Family” and Snyder’s Joker is not “almost” fan fiction, it is fan fiction and that’s something he should be proud of. While I have been wary about the amount of horror that has been injected into Batman, and concerned the Joker hasn’t to this point been very funny, and that each and every issue hasn’t been an ideal portrayal, I will always be appreciative knowing a fan is writing this cornerstone of comics."
    • Whether fan fiction writers are or aren't going pro, they still have to deal with some similar issues. Fandom Wanderers decided to offer some advice, a lot of which related to dealing with one's audience. "You can’t please everyone – in every story, you will have at least one reviewer who says “Can you make … happen?” If that happens to fit with your storyline and you want to, go ahead. If not, don’t. It’s your story, not theirs" but also "Be grateful to your reviewers – A lot of people lurk on fanfiction sites – I know, I’m guilty of it myself – and you can’t always tell if they’ve enjoyed the story...So when you get a review, thank that person...If it’s a particularly long and helpful review, take the time to message them and let them know that you’re grateful for their feedback."

    What fanfiction habits and activities do you take part in? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Copyright is the question

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 17 February 2013 - 12:27am
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    • While a lot of fans are aware that older fiction is often part of the public domain, many might assume the same to be true about speech by deceased celebrities and historical figures. But as a Freakonomics podcast discussed, a century old speech might still be restricted. "What I assumed was that as we’ve all written quoting throughout our writing career you abstract a certain amount of words, and you don’t necessarily quote an entire book, but you can quote selected passages" under fair use. "Well there is no fair use law in the United Kingdom." So for a biography on Churchill his estate would require "Five hundred pounds per 1,000 words quoted." The problem extends to institutions and valuable historical material. "[W]e’ve had lots of cultural institutions, museums and galleries coming to us saying we’ve got tapes, old videotapes, spools of tapes rotting in our basements because we can’t digitize them, because in digitizing you are changing the format, which require permission from the copyright holder. And with a lot of these old 1920s, 1930s films and recordings the copyright holder can’t be found. And so these tapes are left rotting for fear of litigation. So, you know, we really see these absurdities abound." (Transcript available).
    • Even when entertainment industries want to encourage fan interaction, they are often extremely limiting in how that may occur. For example, the official Girls site on Tumblr does not allow material to be combined, any original text, a longer animation than 5 seconds, and even insists on images coming from an official source. "The Girls Tumblr blog has not caused any sort of outrage (yet) but has made GIF artist collective Mr. GIF question HBO's intentions. 'It is pretty funny that they put so many constraints on what you can submit,' Mr. GIF told the Daily Dot. 'It looks like its a legal thing. I mean it seems like a odd barrier for entry though. You would imagine that the goal is to get as many people as possible to submit.'"
    • Yet as The Learned Fangirl points out, unauthorized content can keep a fandom's heart beating. "YouTube seems like an unlikely location for an multimedia fandom encyclopedia, but it’s probably the only location where such a function is even possible online. Think about it: YouTube is currently the Internet’s second largest search engine – bigger than even Yahoo and Bing – and the Internet’s second most trafficked website. Not to mention, its interface makes for easy social sharing and embeds. The playlist functionality makes it easy for content uploaders to group and categorize videos...And clever labeling of metadata makes it relatively easy to locate obscure content – if you know what you’re looking for. It’s YouTube’s unique combination of platform functionality and social community that makes this, a tech startup probably couldn’t recreate this even if they tried."
    • Or as one cartoon made the case, if Copyright vs. Shakespeare had taken place, Shakespeare, and the larger culture, would have lost.

    What absurdities of copyright have you come across? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom relationships

    By Claudia Rebaza on Thursday, 14 February 2013 - 8:14pm
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    • After Ellen focused on femslash shipping. "The term femslash can be applied to really any female romantic/sexual pairing between characters, even OTPs, but its original purpose was as a reference to alternative lesbian romances based on subtext. Crackships, which is frankly just fun to say, are pairings that are very unlikely to ever occur. In a nutshell, it comes down to the difference between subtext and pure, fun fantasy."
    • Meanwhile Neon Tommy talked about fan relationships when they gather into fandoms. "In spite of the differences, petty feuds, ship wars, emotional turmoil and cyclical upheaval, fandoms exist to fulfill the desire for a community of peers and equals who share similar passions. But like a man, no fandom is an island." Instead they grow, shrink, merge and cross over. "Tenuous connections between families are created—"Firefly" and "The Avengers" are connected through Joss Whedon; actors and writers and directors cross over and expand the fandoms, bringing in new ideas and new points of view. New fans should not be excluded; rather, it should be the opposite. New fans keep the fandom's population up; but also, it prevents stagnation." And always important to keep in mind: "Even if your fandom isn't as well-known or visible as another, it's still fantastic, and, more importantly, it's yours."
    • Conversely Leverage actress Gina Bellman wrote in The Guardian about a fandom family from the celebrity side. "By seasons four and five, there was a constant flow of tweets, videos and photos posted from the set, trailers, writers' room, costume fittings and even the catering tent. Nowhere was out of bounds. We would gather in the studio to view the fan videos, made in homage to favourite characters or story lines. Hundreds, maybe even thousands of Leverage fan vids are posted on YouTube, some of them expertly edited little treasures in their own right and receiving up to 40,000 hits...At some point, we started referring to fans by their names and avatars."
    • Instead of using the family metaphor, The Atlantic chose religion when discussing sports fandom. "Durkheim, a pioneering sociologist, began digging through accounts of 'primitive' cultures like the Arunta tribe of Australia, hoping to excavate the ancient source of ties that bind. His conclusion—as revealed in The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life—remains as profound and relevant today as it is elegantly simple: Whenever a society (or, here, sports subculture) worships a divine form, it is, in fact, also simultaneously worshipping itself." Fandom objects are totems and "totems, while 'officially' symbolizing deities, also implicitly offer vessels for fellowship; licenses to congregate together." An article released the same day on Deadspin showed how Facebook data could provide an NFL fandom map.

    What femslash, OTP, shipping, ship war, or Jossverse story do you have to share? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom when cash is on the scene

    By Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 12 February 2013 - 9:06pm
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    • Although there's been a lot of talk recently regarding fanfic authors going pro, there's been less focus on fan video makers. Tessa Stuart wrote in L.A. Weekly about Machinima's overreaching contracts with fan producers on YouTube. "Over the last two years, YouTube has quietly transformed from the province of amateurs to an increasingly cutthroat ecosystem where everyone — stars, networks, advertisers — is competing for views, viewers and view time." As a result "Internet and intellectual-property lawyers say that a rash of public disputes between networks and their talent suggests a serious problem in the emerging industry." The article talks about the origins of the machinima community and how the practice was co-opted by for-profit entities. One of the latest is a new organization called Union for Gamers. "Everyone in Union for Gamers, Duncan says, would be entitled to the same CPM, which would be raised every year. Gamers no longer would be forced into restrictive contracts — union members would have the right to leave whenever they saw fit. He promises 'resources to help people create better videos,' adding, 'and we'll do the labor, the administration and ad-serving side, allowing them to monetize their content.'"
    • An AP article on Nerdist described the site as "the purest expression of fanboy-ism" following "a kind of manifesto...of an 'artful nerd' — one whose fandom isn't merely critical and passive, but is passionately proactive." The analogy to a growing empire seems apt, "As Hardwick says, there's something of 'a land grab with nerd culture right now'" and they are following it with podcasts, a YouTube channel, book, talk show, etc. "Nerds can be out about the stuff that they love without as much as the stigma against it as when I was growing up," says Hardwick. "I just want people to feel OK about what they love. Unless that thing is murder and you're a Murder Nerd."
    • Writing for New Republic, Marc Tracy talks about the effect of gambling on sports fandom. "I am a football obsessive. I’m also something of a purist. Not counting fantasy football and March Madness pools, I had made maybe four sports bets in my life until last month, when I decided to bet throughout the NFL playoffs. I wanted to see if, as I’d long believed, betting distorts one’s appreciation of the game; if the psychic benefits outweighed the costs, literal or otherwise; and if I could balance one type of entertainment (elite competition) with another (risking money)." He found "Nothing is as bewitching as money. When it’s at risk, your mind can think of nothing else...There was great football being played, and here I was thinking about money—not even money that I had risked, but rather money that I had not risked." His conclusion? "Our pastimes, whatever they may be, should be sacrosanct. They are part of why we go to work, save money, and take time for ourselves."

    What commercialization of fandom stories do you have to tell? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: What makes a fandom?

    By Claudia Rebaza on Thursday, 7 February 2013 - 5:44pm
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    • In reviewing a book on Twilight fandom for Religion Bulletin, writer Kelly Baker discusses how all her female family members pondered the novels. "We read them, we talked about them, we criticized them, and we reread them. Despite the bad prose and melodramatic storyline, something about the books managed to appeal to all of us. What was it about the series that drew us in? What kept us reading? Why did we all hate Breaking Dawn? What vision of the world did we consume by embracing this fantasy? What did fandom suggest about us and the series?"
    • At Freakonomics sociologist Jennifer Lena discussed the factors that influence the spread of musical taste. Her conclusion is that our taste for communities is what determines our other tastes. "Some people are into local music scenes because they like to interact with the musicians and other fans on a regular basis. They like that ticket prices are low and that the music is relatively unknown outside of their core group...In contrast, the global pop music experience is almost totally mediated by screens—blogs and music videos, for example—and most Pop fans have no unmediated interaction with the performers...We tend to think about taste as being all about aesthetic style, but ask someone what kind of music they like and they are likely to say, 'Oh, I like a little of everything.' Of course, we don’t actually like all music, indiscriminately. Instead we choose what bluegrass we like, or what kind of rock appeals to us based on our preference for one kind of music community over another."
    • Comics Beat memorialized The Comics Buyer's Guide as an entry into comics fandom. "There was no internet to bombard you with information on every topic, so every introduction to a secret world of obsession was really an initiation. Through Don and Maggie I learned about Doctor Who and Stephen King for the first time, and probably more. (I was a very lonely, isolated home schooled kid with no friends, so this was the only way to learn of anything off the beaten path.)" A professional career followed. "I’ve said it many times but Maggie is my role model—I want to be as smart and inquisitive and engaged as she is every day of my life. Now, many years later, I’m told I’m a role model for some younger women in the field. You try to pass it on."

    What's central to your fandoms? Tell us about it in Fanlore. Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Is it Fanfic or Isn't It?

    By Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 5 February 2013 - 4:19pm
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    • Not that fans haven't always known about published works that have had their serial numbers filed off, but apparently the wider world is taking notice. Book Riot took a tongue-in-cheek look at YA literature to speculate on which of its works might secretly be fanfiction. "By now we know that Twilight spawned not one but TWO works of fan-fiction that became hot publishing properties...What’s super-amusing about this is that all the books in the Twilight series are Stephenie Meyers’ fan-fiction-y versions of her favorite classics...I have a feeling there’s more popular YA out there that’s secretly fan-fiction and am going to put on my Girl Detective hunting cap and jump right in and start guessing." Among her choices: "The Fault in Our Stars is just Dawson’s Creek if both Pacey and Joey had cancer" and "Matched by Ally Condie is obviously just fan-fiction for The Selected Works of Dylan Thomas."
    • Le Figaro highlights some RPS written about George Hergé, author of Tintin and his friend Tchang Tchong-Jen. In Georges & Tchang : une histoire d'amour au XXe siècle the graphic novel speculates on the private life of Hergé "because of the ambiguous sexuality of Tintin." The creator, Laurent Colonnier describes himself as a fan of Hergé who was inspired to create the work after reading an interview given by Hergé where he describes his work "Tintin au Tibet" simply as a story of love and friendship. This made Colonnier wonder about the loves of Hergé, given his solidarity for Tchong-Jen's views of China. Similarly, Tchong-Jen praised Hergé's work as a magnificent lesson against racism.
    • Slashfilm.com started off its review of Bates Motel by saying "The line between prequel/sequel and fan fiction blurs further." They ponder what constitutes canon given that "[t]he movies don’t have the clearest story path with respect to what is 'official'." At the TCA's, producer Carlton Cuse "explained that, when it comes to the film series, “We don’t really view any of that as canon.” The show might be likened to another reboot, Sherlock, given that "[t]he TV show takes place in the modern day, rather than in the ’50s or ’60s, and...the origin of Norman Bates 'will not be what you expect it to be.'"

    What reboot, prequel, and fanficcy rewrite is among your favorites? Tell us something about them in Fanlore. Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Technology and Legal Matters

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 3 February 2013 - 6:59pm
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    • While 2012 is now behind us, some of its legal developments may catch up to us in 2013. TechDirt warned that a proposed copyright small claims court "may have a bigger impact than the DMCA." Because prosecuting users is generally so expensive for rights holders, they're looking for other ways to target those they consider guilty of infringement. "We see a lot of the bullying and trolling that takes place in the informal copyright system, where overreaching DMCA takedown notices and cease and desist letters are common. As many people reading this may know, bogus copyright claims are regularly misused to takedown otherwise legal content. So we have to balance the need of independent creative people to get 'justice' for their works being wholly misappropriated by bad actors, while keeping life sane for average internet users."
    • It's not like we need more examples of bogus copyright takedowns to prove a point, but we still give a nod to Tech Crunch for making the story entertaining with its headline Amazon Pulls Self-Published Memoir About Star Wars Because it References Star Wars. " [I]f Amazon wants to be the central repository for all paid and unpaid unpublished work, they need more than a Mechanical Turk to kick books into the 'potentially infringes' pile...Amazon cannot go the route of YouTube and other media sharing systems that are reliant on the good graces of big media and tend to ban first and ask no questions later. Instead, problems like these need a dedicated person with some authority to make the ultimate and intelligent choice."
    • An article on frictionless entertainment explained the term as the "world of streamed music and videos where the producers, broadcasters, advertisers and various others (mostly stealthy tracking parties) watch what you watch and listen to what you listen to." Discussing how services such as Spotify, Netflix, Hulu, Kinect, Apple and Amazon gather data, they note "In almost every other setting, all these practices would qualify as cyberstalking."

    What legal developments are you concerned about in 2013? If you're interested in fair use and how it relates to fanfiction and other fanworks, write about them in Fanlore. Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanfiction everywhere

    By Claudia Rebaza on Friday, 25 January 2013 - 8:29pm
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    • Bob Tarantino at JD Supra Law updated a 2010 discussion about fanfic in light of recent developments in Canada. "A discussion of the legal implications of fan fiction would not be complete without mentioning two relevant matters which are not affected by the UGC exception introduced by the CMA: moral rights and trade-mark (or passing off) claims." Although the UGC exception pertains to copyright infringement, it "has no effect on an author's potential moral rights claims. And because fan fiction may make use of elements of an author's creation such as titles, character and location names to which some form of trade-mark protection applies (e.g., Star Wars fan fiction that makes use of character names like Luke Skywaylker (a registered mark in Canada), ...there remains the possibility that some form of trade-mark based action could be commenced by the relevant rights-owner."
    • Regardless of what's being discussed in legal circles, fanfic is moving to being both acknowledged and appreciated by perfomers, and seen as a matter worth discussing by the press. A news story on the TCA session for new series The Following began "Shippers, start your engines. Ready your Tumblrs. Start combing the works of Edgar Allen Poe for excellent fan fiction titles." The reason? "FOX’s new drama “The Following,”from “Scream” scribe Kevin Williamson, is a violent, provocative drama about a serial killer and the man hunting him. But, surprisingly, it’s constructed more like a romance." And it contains a canon M-M-F threesome. A reporter "confessed that, having seen the first four episodes of the show, she’s rooting for Hardy and Carroll to kiss. Ever the crowd pleaser, Bacon happily grabbed Purefoy’s face and laid a smooch on him."
    • Zakia Uddin wrote in The Society Pages about fanfic role playing on Omegle. "We perform identities on social networks, using filters and images, and timelines, and real-time updates – but those identities are never too far removed from those we perform in real-world frames. Roleplaying on Omegle offers a way of getting closer to other writers’ characters in ways which are paradoxically more personal and more immersed in the author’s creation than ever before. While fans wait for their favourite TV series or book series to start up again, they create narratives in collaboration with others which run parallel to their ‘real’ lives. What happens to the division between the fiction and nonfiction when we can experience being someone entirely different every day, within the frames of social networks like Tumblr and Facebook?"

    Do you role play? Will you be watching The Following? Write about it in Fanlore. Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Legal and Technology Stories

    By Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 22 January 2013 - 7:29pm
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    • News about a Google TV that interprets its viewers' behavior to recommend shows to them raises questions about how useful such a technology would be, and to whom, not to mention the privacy matters involved. "James McQuivey at Forrester Research said consumers will accept these privacy tradeoffs if they see an advantage to the new style of television. 'If you ask people, of course they will say no,' McQuivey told AFP, while noting that millions have accepted this type of tracing by connecting their TVs to Xbox consoles with Kinect motion detection where 'the camera is tracking you all the time'...But he said companies should be prepared to develop privacy policies to avoid government intervention."
    • Nielsen is also planning to gather consumer data, in this case by following Twitter activity that occurs using the hashtags displayed during TV show broadcasts. "Peter Rice, Chairman and CEO, Fox Networks Group said, 'Twitter is a powerful messenger and a lot of fun for fans of our shows, providing them with the opportunity to engage, connect and voice their opinions directly to each other and us. Combining the instant feedback of Twitter with Nielsen ratings will benefit us, program producers, and our advertising partners.'"
    • Germany may be taking Facebook to court over its policy of banning pseudonyms. "Facebook began cracking down on pseudonym accounts in early 2011, and made a renewed effort to purge such accounts in August 2012. In September, Facebook started encouraging users to report friends who don’t use their real names." Germany was successful in its earlier effort last year when its "state data protection authority sued Facebook over its facial recognition software that automatically recognized and tagged people in photos uploaded to a user’s profile."

    Know about other fandom stories involving Twitter, pseudonyms or television viewing? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom invisibility

    By Claudia Rebaza on Friday, 18 January 2013 - 9:12pm
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    • While there have been a number of comedy troupes around the world doing shows based on fanfic readings, they have largely used fanfic written specifically for the shows by the performers themselves. A recent review of Black Swan Comedy in Toronto, a monthly comedy series focusing on fan fiction, made clear that the performers were reading material pulled from online sources instead. "'We find the best/worst fan fiction. We'll read it once to know that it's perfectly bad at the start, and then find out how horrible it is on stage together with the audience,' says Jeremy Woodcock of Rulers of the Universe." There was an aftershow by the Weaker Vessels which was labeled "a Harry Potter fan fic" making it unclear if it was simply a show based on Harry Potter or one which specialized in reading only from that fandom. Apparently the shortcut is doing well for Black Swan Comedy as the readings are a "sold-out event every month."
    • A recent story at The Daily Dot on finding community through porn gives only passing mention to written material, which perhaps explains why there is an assumption that such communities are a recent development thanks to the mainstreaming of porn. "The shock value and taboo is dissipating, and the more it does, the more porn appears. But do we understand why the rise of the group mentality in porn? Why porn consumers no longer want to be alone, but rather want to belong—to other like-minded porn consumers, and to make small talk and chat about their interests?" While the article acknowledges that women have their own communities -- "Slate writer Amanda Hess points out that 'Women who engage effectively online can find resources for critically assessing [pornography’s] most sexist tropes, join communities that don’t share those norms, and benefit from a kind of increased sexual mobility they can’t always find in real life'" -- it doesn't explore their history.
    • Another Daily Dot story instead focused on deliberate invisibility -- or at least an attempt to maintain a fourth wall. "In the world of theatre, the ‘fourth wall' refers to the invisible wall that divides the characters from the audience. In fanwork-based fandom, the fourth wall refers to the invisible 'wall' of silence, pseudonyms, and covert activity that shields fans from the judgment of the outside world." However, fandoms do not react in unison to outside observation, nor are the outsiders always negative about their discoveries, even when it's about themselves. "This isn't the first time Seguin and his fellow hockey players have found slash about themselves. In July, Toronto Marlies hockey player Jesse Blacker tweeted a link to adorable fanart of himself and Segs, calling it 'awesome.'" Cult film director Duncan Jones was delighted by finding fanfiction of his work. "'Wow! I did not know about this!' responded a delighted Jones. After sharing the link with his Twitter followers, Jones followed it to an AO3 fic with 'lots of robo-feels and some clone hugging.' After reading, he left a thoughtful and flattered review for the author, Wildgoosery."

    What fandom invisibility problems have you encountered? What fan collaborations have you taken part in? Tell us about it in Fanlore. Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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