News of Note

  • OTW Fannews: Troubling tech issues

    By Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 7 December 2013 - 9:12pm
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    Banner by Diane of the post title and OTW logo in striated colors as if they were going through interference.

    • Attack of the Fanboy wrote about various troubling issues affecting gaming fandom. One of the most recent involves the data Sony is gathering from users. "Sony’s updated Terms of Service reserved their right to prohibit the sale of used software, but tucked away in the updated version, the company also reserves the right to monitor users voice and text communication on the PlayStation Network."
    • Attack of the Fanboy also ran an article on forced labor used to build PS4 consoles. "Students in the programme have fainted from fatigue. The Yantai factory has already come under fire for a 300+ worker brawl at the factory in September, and denied previous speculation that people were left dead after the event, and rumours of rape around the factory are also being heard across news outlets...Despite such a bad reputation, Sony are using this facility to build PS4′s, and it certainly casts a small shadow over the companies brand identity as the PS4 launch draws closer."
    • Google's decision to force people commenting at YouTube to create or use their Google+ accounts is meeting resistance due to Google+'s insistence on real name usage. X-box players are off the hook for now. "Microsoft has made some talk about the ability for someone to use their real name for their gamertag. This, according to Microsoft, may prevent actions that some deal as unsavory or trollish...and to help identify yourself to your friends." However "[u]nlike Blizzard’s short foray with Blizzard Real ID that forced users to use their real names and subsequently backfired, Microsft will only offer it as a choice."
    • TeleRead posted about problems in reading content away from Fanfiction.net. "It’s worth mentioning that Fanfiction.net has also removed the ability to select text from its stories for copying and pasting. It is no longer possible to highlight or mark text with the mouse on its stories. And some users have complained that Fanfiction.net has upped the amount of advertising on its pages as well." Demand for downloads is high. "The author of the Fanfiction Downloader app noted that he had to disable the email-based interface of his app, except for emailing directly to Kindles, because after FLAG was blocked its load went from about 100 requests per day to more than 5,000 per hour. It seems there are a lot of people out there who would rather read fanfiction on their e-readers or mobile e-reader apps than from a web browser."

    What tech-related fandom issues have you come across? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Wanting more

    By Claudia Rebaza on Wednesday, 4 December 2013 - 10:07pm
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    • All sorts of works inspire the desire for more. Anthony Tommasini writes in The New York Times about the future lives of opera characters. "There is a lively realm of fan fiction focused on movie and television characters, in which viewers share ideas on how some breakup or betrayal might turn out. Opera fans, by contrast, are fixated on characters who have been around for generations, even centuries...Yet we, too, like to speculate on what happens after the final curtain falls. Several recent books grapple with Puccini’s 'Madama Butterfly,' imagining what happens to the 3-year-old boy, nicknamed Trouble, born to the caddish Lieutenant Pinkerton and Cio-Cio San, the geisha who commits suicide. Online, opera lovers are pretty playful about their fantasies of what might happen in favorite works, especially Wagner’s epic 'Ring.' One wag envisions a fifth installment to the cycle in which the Rhinemaidens, fed up after years of devotion and celibacy, open a classy brothel where clients must pay for services in gold."
    • Meanwhile Washington Post writer Alexandra Petrin complains about a new authorized Jeeves and Wooster novel. "I am trying to imagine a reader who wants to read this book. The only one I can conjure up is someone who actually has read all the existing Jeeves and Wooster tales and is baying desperately after more. And this isn’t that. This is caffeine when what you want is cocaine. I think? I am not very up on my drugs. Look, this is fanfiction. I am not an expert except in the sense that all former nerdy 14-year-old girls are experts. And fanfiction is not what they wrote. It is what you remember. It is what you loved, what spoke to you. It is what Faulks describes in the introduction. There is much good fan work out there, approved and un-. But as an introduction to the work in question, I cannot recommend it."
    • Salon posted a discussion of Jane Austen related works. "If 'Longbourn' is the porridge that coldly chastises Austen and 'Sense & Sensibility' is too warmly attached to its predecessor to breathe, then 'The Lizzy Bennet Diaries' (followed by 'Emma, Approved,' still ongoing) is just right." This is because "the best part of the series may be what it leaves to the audience. Costumed reenactments of off-screen scenes, alternate video diaries filmed by other characters, as well as tweets and Tumblrs posted in tandem with the videos, turn the viewing experience into a 'reading' experience, with fans asked to go back and forth between different media and draw inferences and make judgments on their own. It’s enough intertextuality to make even the most academic Janeite geek out."
    • While Amazon's Kindle Worlds has added a comics universe for its pay-to-play fanfiction program, the real buzz has been about a Batman fancomic posted freely online. "There is a lot of backlash at Hollywood with all the remakes and stuff, but if you look at the state of comics, I think it’s far worse; nothing ever changes. I don’t like that. Of course there is always great stuff out there, but what I mean is, when Stan Lee created all those wonderful marvel characters in the 60′s, he was coming up with them on a monthly basis, we forget that it was once all NEW stuff. I would love to read what the amazing writers of both Marvel and DC would come up with if they could do anything they wanted with the characters."

    What stories have you most wanted to see more of? Write about their fanworks on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Democratizing writing

    By Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 30 November 2013 - 1:38am
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    • The University of Minnesota's Minnesota Daily ran an article claiming that fanfiction has revolutionized literature. "Fan fiction is a perfectly competitive industry into which anyone, regardless of age, sex, or economic status, can enter and in which anyone can prosper...Ours, then, will be the first generation in history to have a durable literature written by the common individual. Until extremely recently, authors were predominantly rich, educated males with leisure time to write and enough money to be published...Fan fiction, for better or worse, will one day be studied alongside Homer and Dickens...Historians will be able to look back on our time and see the interests of everyone, not just a select minority."
    • The Sydney Morning Herald followed up on the idea that fanfiction may reveal wider interests than mainstream commercial work previously allowed, stating 'The alpha male's seductive power may be waning'. "[A] new generation of romance writers and publishers are beginning to embrace metrosexual and bisexual heroes to reflect changing sexual tastes...Melbourne-based author Anna Cowan has caused a stir with a Regency romance that twists the gender role of her hero, a character partly inspired by gay fan fiction. Penguin's ebook, Untamed, features a dark, deeply damaged, cross-dressing duke who is bisexual. The Duke of Darlington sleeps with the heroine's sister, and with men, and is attended by a bunch of overtly gay dandies."
    • A researcher who asked for help from OTW News readers in 2012 has since completed her work, which reveals some of these same issues of diversity in taste. Dianna Fielding wrote Normalizing the Deviance: The Creation, Politics, and Consumption of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identities in Online Fan Communities. "Communities of fan producers have been creating and consuming works labeled deviant by both laypeople and academics for decades. Fan producers take the popular media they enjoy and rewrite it to fit their needs and desires. Online, these fan producers have found a new space to re-write what it means to be normative. These fan producers often write about slash, which depicts homosexual relationships as normal, and genderswap, which plays with the idea of gender by physically switching characters’ sex...Through content analysis, a series of interviews (n = 26), and a survey (n = 224), of fan producers directly, this study gains a better understand of these producers’ motivations for producing fan works."

    How have you seen fanfiction democratizing writing? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Writing and performing

    By Claudia Rebaza on Monday, 18 November 2013 - 9:21pm
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    Banner by caitie of Inception characters on a stage

    • Allena Tapia wrote at The Huffington Post about 4 F-Words That Support Your Child As a Writer. The tips included encouraging fanfic, use of graphics and multiple platforms, "and total freedom over what he reads and writes."
    • MTV.com wrote about The Janoskians' One Direction mockumentary. In a familiar fan move, further installments are being held hostage until they get sufficient feedback. "The video has already clocked up over 200,000 views on YouTube in just a couple of days, but episode two will only be released once number one hits the big 500K. On their ‘#NotABoyBand World Tour’ earlier this year, The Janoskians performed a One Direction skit as part of their act, but insisted at the time that there is no 'hate' between them and the most famous boy band in the world. Beau told MTV UK back in May: 'To be honest, me and Luke actually love One Direction, we’re huge 1D fans.'"
    • The Daily Dot wrote about the Inception musical staged in New York City. "The event has garnered considerable buzz from the Inception community as well; fans are planning to make the trek to the show from as far away as Canada. It might seem like a surprising act of devotion, but to fans who’ve had no new canon for years, getting the chance to see any new spin on their beloved movie is a not-to-be-missed chance. Fans are also drawn to the musical for shipper reasons: the libretto blatantly indulges the reading of the popular subtext between Arthur and Eames."
    • The L.A. Weekly wrote about slash and the fan con Escapade. "Slash has expanded beyond small, old-school communities like Escapade to younger, Internet fans, who are expressing themselves not only through stories but also via images and GIFs on Tumblr. Over Twitter, some share their obsession with the creators of the shows themselves, a breach that older slash fans used to view as unseemly. Still, among the general public, slash remains little known and little understood."

    What fannish works and fannish history have you experienced? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Dos and Don'ts

    By Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 16 November 2013 - 7:32pm
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    Banner by Bremo of the cover of Rainbow Rowell's novel 'Fangirl' with the Fannews post title

    • TheWrap wrote about a problem in Scandal fandom. A controversial "fan" blogger was revealed to be a sales director for the show's network. "ABC issued the following statement to TheWrap: 'We take these allegations very seriously. We are investigating the situation and will handle accordingly.' Show bloggers and fans have said that Pajor has crossed the line in her exchanges with fans and journalists who don’t share her opinions. The accusations range from incidents as minor as calling other fans 'crazy'...to attacking journalists, including TheWrap, all unbecoming behavior for an employee of the network."
    • Rainbow Rowell's novel Fangirl has received many glowing reviews, some from self-professed fangirls. Alyssa Rosenberg however took issue with its surface portrayal of the protagonist's fannish life. "You can tell terrific and compelling stories about online relationships...there’s real space for a novel that places fan culture at the center of the action, and specifically, women’s engagement with fan culture. Fangirl has Cath writing slash fan fiction, and has some engagement with the sex she writes as opposed to the physical contact she experiences in the real world, as well as the phenomenon of fan fiction authors moving on to create worlds and characters of their own...People like Cath don’t just turn to fandom and online communities because they’re damaged or scared...Fandom deserves a novel that doesn’t treat it like a pale substitute for life, when fan communities can be such a major component of it."
    • Perhaps Cath just needed an offline friend to join her in online fandom? Nerd Bastards provided a list of what not-to-do when recruiting for a fandom though, including "Making Everything About the Relationship About the Fandom", "Not Being Open or Receptive to Their Fandom" and "Not Seeing, or Accepting the Signs That They Don’t Like Your Fandom."

    What fandom dos and don'ts have you come across? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Playfulness and IP

    By Claudia Rebaza on Thursday, 14 November 2013 - 5:28pm
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    Banner by Erin of Lawrence Lessig holding a light saber by the logo for the EFF, facing off against the logo of Liberation holding up cash and a DMCA notice.

    • The University of Buffalo hosted a lecture by intellectual property scholar Madhavi Sunder titled Learning by Doing. Sunder says. “'Copyright owners have tolerated much fan activity on the theory that lawsuits can turn fans’ love to hate. But the emergence of an ‘experience economy’ may lead some owners of cultural property to reconsider their laissez-faire attitude toward play'...But, Sunder says, that impulse raises caution flags about 'the commoditization of fundamental human experiences and play.'...And because IP law is 'fundamentally about promoting knowledge and learning,' Sunder says, lawyers need to be careful to protect that goal, even when they are asked to help corporations turn such play into a commodity to be bought and sold.'"
    • One place rife with automated takedowns, which are particularly likely to be issued indiscriminately, is YouTube. Fortunately, as NPR put in its story title Record Label Picks Copyright Fight — With The Wrong Guy, IP scholar Lawrence Lessig had a video of a lecture taken down due to a small music clip within it. "At first, YouTube took it down. But being a copyright attorney, Lessig knew his rights. He was entitled to use these clips in a lecture under a legal doctrine known as fair use...Liberation Music eventually backed down. But Lessig decided to invoke another part of the copyright law, 'which basically polices bad-faith lawsuits,' he says — threats made fraudulently or without proper basis. Lessig is suing Liberation Music because he wants labels to stop relying on automated systems to send out takedown notices."
    • As vidders well know, hosting sites for their fanworks tend to be more limited than those for other media, and they have often booted fan content entirely when the sites changes their marketing focus. The latest site to evict fan videos is Blip.tv, which deleted content within the past week. The OTW has some tips about alternatives for video makers and the top pick is Critical Commons. Though academic in nature, they welcome fanworks, support fair use, and provide a good alternative to commercial sites such as Vimeo and YouTube. The site already hosts some key works that are part of vidding history.
    • A new software program, Plotagon, offers a way to create a paint-by-numbers fanwork. "Available for Mac and PC, the basic 'city' version of Plotagon software is free and includes five actors and six environments. To create a Plotagon movie, users simply choose characters and an environment, type a script, add a few stage directions and press 'play.' Plotagon movies can be shared online and viewed at Plotagon.com/movies." Properties include Alice in Wonderland and Pride and Prejudice.

    What fanwork and intellectual property stories have you seen? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Minorities in Fandom

    By Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 12 November 2013 - 5:59pm
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    • PC Mag ran several articles on minorities in fandom from a panel at New York Comic Con. "Representations of Muslims in media have improved as well. Muhammad Aurangzeb Ahmad, who created the sci-fi compilation A Mosque Among the Stars, said that in the past decade 'Muslims in comics were the quintessential other.' But this has changed with a French Batman who is an Algerian Muslim, a Green Lantern who is a Lebanese Muslim from Detroit, and other re-imagined characters."
    • Such panels at major fan cons are seen as critical for raising awareness of troubling issues in fandom. "Jay Justice said, 'the media doesn’t promote us, so we have to promote ourselves.' Taking onto Tysk’s comments she pointed out that up to a certain age society seems to have no problem with children dressing up in costumes outside of their race. It’s something we often see, for instance, in elementary school Halloween celebrations. Yet at some point we start facing the 'why are you, as a non-white person, trying to portray that white character' questions. Justice asked, 'at what age are we supposed to start telling children that they can’t play certain characters?'"
    • India.com announced the arrival of a new Indian superhero, Chakra on November 30. His move is the result of a partnership between Cartoon Network, Graphic India and POW! Entertainment. "'Chakra: The Invincible' was also selected as part of a handful of third-party content partners soon to be featured on Rovio Entertainment's new ToonsTV platform - one of the largest global digital platforms for kids in the world with over a billion views already since its launch."
    • Disputes in media fandoms tend to lean to verbal harassment rather than physically violent extremes. But the problems generally emerge from a failure to understand the other side's concerns. This can erode formerly good relations between fans and creators, or fans and other fans. "Teen Wolf released a video of actor Dylan O’Brien asking for fans to vote for Teen Wolf in a TV Guide poll... O’Brien joked that if people didn’t vote, they’d kill off the show’s lone surviving gay character, Danny...The joke didn’t seem very funny, particularly when the survival rate for side characters in Teen Wolf is notoriously low for anyone who isn’t a straight, white man."

    What troubling issues have you seen in fandoms? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Female fandoms old and new

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 10 November 2013 - 11:17pm
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    • The Observer ran a long, in-depth piece by Dorian Lynskey about Beatlemania specifically, but also how female music fandoms have ever been thus. The term 'mania' was "first applied to fandom in 1844 when German poet and essayist Heinrich Heine coined the word Lisztomania to describe the 'true madness, unheard of in the annals of furore' that broke out at concerts by the piano virtuoso Franz Liszt. The word had medical resonances and Heine considered various possible causes of the uproar, from the biological to the political, before deciding, prosaically, that it was probably just down to Liszt's exceptional talent, charisma and showmanship."
    • Meanwhile author Kameron Hurley complains about the media's erasure of women in My Little Pony fandom. "Here was this fandom that I had to keep hidden for much of my life, because it was 'too girly.' Because talking about it made me feminine, and therefore weak, and I didn’t want to be like any of 'those' girls. Every time I brought it up, dudes made these assumptions about me. They teased me mercilessly...But I carried on, because dammit, pretty rainbow horses made me happy...What I didn’t expect was that this marginalized fandom with tiny cons that drew maybe a few hundred people a year was suddenly going to be legitimized now because now *men* said that they watched the show and collected the ponies."
    • The Atlantic Wire cites a visible woman, Kelly Sue DeConnick, and how she's affecting women in comics. "'Having Kelly Sue be such an outspoken, unapologetic feminist is so wonderful. Those are the voices we need in industries like that so, like she said, our daughters (and our gay sons and our trans kids and any of our kids if we're not white) don't have to,' writer Sam Einhorn told me. Einhorn blogs about feminism and the comics industry...'I'm glad Marvel not only has a voice saying 'we can do better' and 'our work isn't done' (and also occasionally 'shut up dude') but that they keep her around and give her books to write.'"
    • The Oppidan Press featured PhD student Megan van der Nest's presentation Fandom, Personhood and New Imaginaries "on how fanfiction is used to challenge stereotypes in society." First citing the philosophical theories underpinning her work, the article continues "According to van der Nest, fanfiction provides examples of what relationships under different social norms would be like. 'Fandom is all about alternatives,' she said. 'It is common in fandom to explore the forms that relationships might take in a society where they are not constrained by heteronormative expectations.'"

    What work have you seen done focused on female fandoms? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Multiple takes of the same thing

    By Claudia Rebaza on Friday, 8 November 2013 - 10:27pm
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    Banner by Bremo with the post title and images of three different actors portraying Sherlock Holmes

    • The romance publishing industry was among the first to start bringing in self-published writers and first time novelists, which they are now doing through Wattpad. The site has been active internationally, both promoting its site and now partnering with publishers to create a print imprint. Allen Lau, CEO of Wattpad, said “A lot of writers are afraid of sharing their work...And if you hide your work, you miss the opportunity to let other people appreciate your writing, and also missing some big opportunities in the process—your story might even become a movie, for example.”
    • Writers wary of sharing their work have a good reason for it though -- theft. The case of Shey Stahl is a good example of many writers feeding one person's career. "Goodreads reviewer Ari Bookzilla posted a word-by-word comparison between excerpts of Stahl's latest novel, For the Summer, and a popular Twilight fanfic known as Dusty...Other Goodreaders claimed that the novel's summary had been lifted from another Twilight fic: another popular offering called Pickup Truck...Even the title, "For the Summer," is the title of another well-known Twilight fic...The question of why Stahl may have stolen so much from Twilight fanfic authors is simple: She was one. Stahl wrote fanfic under the pen name Jaydmommy, and she was plagued by plagiarism allegations then, too."
    • Such cases of plagiarism make cases such as the ongoing lawsuit involving Sherlock Holmes seem as antiquated as the copyright at the center of the battle. As Tech Dirt pointed out, it would seem that the Conan Doyle Estate Is Horrified That The Public Domain Might Create 'Multiple Personalities' Of Sherlock Holmes. The estate's argument "presents a way to make copyright on characters perpetual. You just need to have someone continue to release new works that have some minor change to the character, and they get to pretend you have a new starting point for the public domain ticker" meaning that "so long as you never 'complete' the character creation, they can never go into the public domain."
    • Shadowlocked argued that there not only can be should be multiple takes on a franchise. "Neill Blomkamp's humility in acknowledging the subjective side of fandom and that his take on the franchise wouldn't have been for everyone is admirable, but perhaps fans as well as filmmakers could learn from this approach. As a fan, it's arguably better to look at a film in a franchise made by a particular director as that director's take on the franchise, rather than, 'How dare they ruin my beloved franchise?' Because directors can be fans too, and not all fans appreciate the source material in exactly the same way."

    What stories about fanfiction publishing and legal rights have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandoms being seen

    By Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 5 November 2013 - 10:03pm
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    Banner by Erin of the post title with a gun, ax, wand and notebooks plus the OTW logo

    • In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, producer Jeff Eastin discussed fanfiction ships and their influence on his work. "White Collar still wins in terms of fan fiction, but I've seen quite a bit of fan fiction directed at Graceland. The Mike-Charlie 'ship seems to be very popular and after that it shifted pretty quickly to Mike and Paige, which was nice to see...I had heard of fan fiction but I never saw the extent that people went to. (Laughs.) Somebody on Twitter sent me a link to some of the better White Collar fan fiction, and once in a while, I'll check it out and see what people are saying. It's really fascinating to me and it's an interesting subculture that arises on a lot of these shows. In my opinion, if you have people who are [taking part], you've made it."
    • Britt Julious of WBEZ wrote about engaging in Scandal fandom through Twitter. "According to a 2009 study from the Pew Research Center’s Pew Internet and American Life Project, Twitter users are more likely to be African-American women. As well, according to a report from the New York Times of Nielsen ratings, 'Scandal is the highest rated scripted drama among African-Americans, with 10.1 percent of black households, or an average of 1.8 million viewers, tuning in during the first half of the season.'" Thus while the fandom can be seen among different generations in a household "My timeline explodes with chatter about the show, its characters, the clothing, and the music as it airs."
    • Julious also mentions Sleepy Hollow, whose fandom is growing quickly. "For a show that has only been on the air for four weeks—the fifth episode airs tonight—Sleepy Hollow's fan base is loud. That's, at least, what you would assume from the decibel level during the show's New York Comic Con panel." Actor Orlando Jones has been particularly engaged with the fandom, saying during the panel "'Fan art rocks! Who ships Ichabbie?' to rich crowd approval...The importance of shipping to the fan base was confirmed further when the next question came from someone who began, 'So if you’ve been paying attention at all to the Tumblr phenomenon of Sleepy Hollow, Icabbie is a huge deal.'"
    • Meanwhile the Harry Potter fandom continues to make news with its lobbying of Warner Brothers. Bustle wrote about the chocolate campaign. "There's always been an oft-spoken of symbiotic relationship between fans and the studios responsible for creating the work those fans love. There's also been an underlying tension. They create the work (or at least bring it to us), yes; but they're also the ones responsible for messing them up. And there are many scenarios that can carry the weight of this tension: The blundering of a book's canon, the mistreatment of a character, the failure of a studio to fully grasp the thematic elements that first made the source material so special, the list goes on and on. Each error can isolate the fan communities huddled around these works, particularly when that bungling of philosophy extends past the films themselves and into the marketing products sold and used in the real world."

    What examples have you seen of fandoms making themselves heard? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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