News of Note

  • OTW Fannews: Fanfic paint by numbers

    By Claudia Rebaza on Monday, 18 March 2013 - 4:29pm
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    • Some entertainment creators like Dan Harmon have fanfiction writers in mind when it comes to their work. Discussing his departure from the beloved show Community, he said "“So, in the immediate wake of it, I was sitting on a linoleum, fluorescent-lit floor outside a dirty little lost-luggage office, with my head between my knees...It probably looked like I was sad, but I think you would have assumed it was because I lost my luggage.” But “I just kept thinking, ‘This is going to be a bummer for the people who get tattoos of the characters, the people who write poems about them, who write fan fiction — they’re the ones that are going to suffer’. ”
    • Other entertainers are thinking of what fanfiction can do for them -- albeit for a good cause. An article on Wetpaint discussed how Vampire Diaries actor Matt Davis wrote fanfic to defend rhinos. "The Cult star was recently inspired to spread the word about the endangered and vulnerable rhinos through his fanfiction, starring Stefan (Paul Wesley), Elena (Nina Dobrev), and Damon (Ian Somerhalder)."
    • In Neil Gaiman's case there was some collaborative work being done with fans, though he took over the writing part. As reported by The Mary Sue, Gaiman wrote stories based on fan tweets as part of a marketing collaboration with Blackberry. His "collaboration is back to the public again, as folks are invited to make art (and eventually videos) of all kinds in response to his twelve little fictions. Some of the artwork will be featured especially in a limited edition book."
    • Other entities, however, are in full-on profit mode. There were various articles over a month's time that promoted search-and-replace fanfic novels by a company marketing "personalized erotic and romance novels." One featured vampires in "a modern retelling of The Odyssey" while another was trumpeted by the National Review as an erotic novel about Barack and Michelle Obama. Surprisingly, the articles tended to focus more on who could be featured in the books than the business model itself.

    What ways have you seen fanfic used in or out of the marketplace? Post about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fannish expectations

    By Claudia Rebaza on Monday, 11 March 2013 - 6:07pm
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    • Peter Guttierez wrote in School Library Journal that "[T]here’s probably no single better way to teach online citizenship to young people than through their participation in organized fandom." To him this involved a behavior checklist because "fans must take into account not just the short-term value of making a point or having the last word, but their long-term relationships with their fellow fans." Some of them include "Am I “adding value” through this interaction, either to an individual or to the wider community? Or am I making this online conversation almost entirely about myself?" and "Am I considerate of others’ privacy and safety?"
    • Other writers are concerned with the expectations fans have of celebrities. The Japan Times reported on the spectacle of Japanese pop star Minami Minegishi shaving her head in apology for having a relationship. "The deeper truth is that idol fan culture, as well as the closely related anime and manga fan culture, is institutionally incapable of dealing with independence in young women. It seeks out and fetishizes weaknesses and vulnerabilities and calls it moé, it demands submissiveness, endless tearful displays of gratitude, a lack of confidence, and complete control over their sexual independence...The danger is of this fantasy creeping out more widely into society: Japan currently ranks at 101 in the world gender-equality rankings (79 places below the United States, 32 below China, and two below Azerbaijan)."
    • The Telegraph wrote about fans' need to fix plot holes. "The web has made this stuff mainstream, but it’s not new: fans of Arthur Conan Doyle have been engaged in “higher criticism” since at least 1928, when Monsignor Ronald Knox published Studies in the Literature of Sherlock Holmes. His fellow “Sherlockians” have since built up a remarkable body of analysis, raising (and resolving) textual problems such as the fact that Watson’s war wound is in his shoulder in A Study in Scarlet, but in his leg in The Sign of Four. To some fans, simply calling it a continuity error, an author’s mistake, is not good enough. The psychologist Simon Baron Cohen says such people have “systematising brains”, good at finding and applying logical rules. To them, these moments of illogic stick out jarringly."
    • A cancelled show has never meant the end to fanfiction, but perhaps creators are more aware that fans will be on the lookout for more content. In the case of Luck "John Perrotta, the show's producer/story editor and a racing industry pro, is writing a teleplay-style blog for the website America's Best Racing that tells "an imagined racetrack-based story, an ongoing saga, which includes some of the characters depicted in the ill-fated 'Luck' series." The work will also be illustrated.

    What fannish expecations have caught your attention? Post about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Authors talk fanfic and fandoms

    By Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 9 March 2013 - 8:52pm
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    • The Salt Lake Tribune talked fanfiction misconceptions with newly published author Christina Hobbs, who says it's a mistake to think "[t]hat there’s a specific type of people who read and write fan fiction — scientists, business professionals, teachers and people who are well-educated to people who haven’t gone to college are all part of it. It’s not just women. It’s not just men. It’s not a certain age group. You have this huge group of people who want to write and read for others, and that’s what’s so amazing about it."
    • Another published fanfic writer, Sam Starbuck, had this answer to the same question: "I've been in fandom almost twenty years, and not only have stereotypes presumably changed in that span of time, but the composition of fandom certainly has." Talking about the inside perspective, he adds, "We tend to see fandom as a single cohesive unit, because we are part of a unit within fandom, and we think fandom is our unit—and some people think fandom reflects the real beliefs of people who aren't in fandom, as well. But I don't think that's necessarily the case. Without even touching on the world outside of fandom, fandom itself is wider and louder and more diverse than any one person generally suspects. I do think I fit a fandom mold in a lot of ways—enthusiastic, nerdy, intelligent, awkwardly socialized—but so do plenty of people who aren't in fandom."
    • Author Victoria Schwab wrote about fans' questions on continuing content. "It’s no secret that the hottest books selling right now started out as fan fiction. It’s no secret because it’s plastered all over the internet, and in the stores. Some books own it, and some books would rather not. The latter claim that while they might have had the seeds of their story in another (and really, aren’t most books inspired by elements of one sort or another) their stories no longer resemble their inspiration...And I think it’s being complicated by other endeavors–such as the Cassie Clare, Sarah Rees Brennan, Maureen Johnson collaboration–that encourage the communal nature of a story."
    • Many a literature class has focused on dissecting what the author meant to say in their work, but a new one instead uses the book as a jumping off point to examine the world. ""The Fifty Shades Trilogy" is a three-credit, 300-level American Studies course at American University focusing on Fifty Shades of Grey." The packed course "involves studying personality disorders, eating disorders, sexual addiction, abuse, the evolution of Internet fan fiction and trends like the increase in sales related to BDSM paraphernalia. Public relations and marketing topics also comprise one-third of the course's curriculum."

    What fanfic authors' discussions have caught your attention? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Privacy and preservation

    By Claudia Rebaza on Thursday, 7 March 2013 - 7:18pm
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    • Salon warned consumers that entertainment driven by data gathering "won't end well." Author Andrew Leonard described how much Netflix knew about his viewing experience with a particular show: "I hit the pause button roughly one-third of the way through the first episode of 'House of Cards,'...Netflix, by far the largest provider of commercial streaming video programming in the United States, registers hundreds of millions of such events...Netflix doesn’t know merely what we’re watching, but when, where and with what kind of device we’re watching. It keeps a record of every time we pause the action — or rewind, or fast-forward — and how many of us abandon a show entirely after watching for a few minutes...Netflix might not know exactly why I personally hit the pause button...but if enough people pause or rewind or fast-forward at the same place during the same show, the data crunchers can start to make some inferences."
    • The government also wants to know what we're doing with our devices. Discussing the release of Twitter's transparency report, The Verge says "Governments seemed more interested in user data last year, making 1,858 information requests (by comparison, Google received a total of 21,389 requests from data just in the second half of 2012). There wasn't a huge shift in any category in the second half of the year for Twitter except for government takedown requests, which rose from 6 to 42." The majority of takedown requests came under the DMCA and "the company removed material from its network for about 45.3% of takedown notices."
    • On the Media broadcast an interview focusing on new copyright enforcement in the U.S. "Starting in the next couple of months, five of the country's largest Internet service providers, AT&T, Cablevision, Comcast, Time Warner Cable and Verizon will implement what is called the Copyright Alert System, known colloquially as 'six strikes.' In the works for over a year, the system is meant to create an escalating series of penalties for serial illegal downloaders." The guest was Jill Lesser, executive director of the Center for Copyright Information, a collaboration between industry associations like the MPAA and RIAA and ISPs. (Transcript available)
    • The Digital Preservation Coalition published the report Intellectual Property Rights and Preservation [PDF 1187KB] by Andrew Charlesworth, focusing on the legal obstacles to preserving digital material. The document focuses on UK law only, but is valuable for its risk assessment and recommended actions, regardless of location.

    What legal and technology stories have you been focused on? Write about those issues in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom in the world

    By Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 5 March 2013 - 10:06pm
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    • Media studies professor Henry Jenkins posted a three part discussion of Chinese fan culture at his blog. He interviews Xiqing Zheng, a PhD candidate studying the topic, asking such questions as: "You suggest that Chinese fans often see themselves as belonging to an elite group. In some other parts of the world, fans are considered anything but because of the low cultural status of the materials they embrace. In what ways have Chinese Otaku sought to legitimate their interests and activities through appeals to elite cultural status?"
    • NPR suggested that Netflix will change TV viewing because releasing a full season all at once will change "[t]he way we talk about what we watch, the way we share, the way reviewers critique shows, and even the ad model -- everything will have to change." The discussion focused largely on the commercial interests of ad sellers and critics. Left out of the discussion is how many fans around the world have binge watched seasons since the days of sharing shows through videotape, often cross-nationally when shows were not available in their viewing areas, and how this helped create wider communities around the shows.
    • Writing at AfterEllen, Dana Piccoli discussed femslash ships in European shows. "One thing I’ve learned during my travels as a gay lady is that if there is lesbian content somewhere, lesbians will find it. If there were a show with a lesbian character being broadcast solely from the North Pole, there would be an Olivia cruise ship full of lesbians on its way there right now."
    • AlJazeera's show The Stream aired an episode asking "Can online fandom make the world a better place?" Former board member Francesca Coppa was among the guests who discussed fan activism and online mobilization. Although no transcript is available, the episode has a Storify page.

    What stories can you tell about fandom around the world? Post them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Keeping up with the times

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 3 March 2013 - 7:44pm
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    • The experience of BioWare and EA, developer and publisher of multiplayer online role-playing game Star Wars: The Old Republic suggests that addressing problems of representation should probably not be done after the fact. While many were happy to hear the company would be introducing same-sex romance options to the game, the announcement received both the usual homophobic backlash as well as disappointment from same-sex romance supporters of how slowly and how poorly the gamers were accommodated. "These characters will only be available via Rise of the Hutt Cartel, an expansion pack to be released in Spring 2012 [sic], meaning that players will have to pay to be gay in the game. SGR will also only be limited to Makeb, a planet that has been dubbed as a "gay ghetto" by multiple media outlets."
    • The Daily Dot also wrote about two fans' live-action remake of Toy Story and included Pixar employee tweets stating "Remember when being a big fan of a movie only meant you could quote all the dialogue?"
    • Deirdre Macken of The Australian would likely prefer those fans of old. Lamenting "the extinction of literature's audience", she wrote "Instead of readers, a writer today will have fans who pay homage to the author by plagiarising their style in fan fiction. Instead of readers, a writer will have followers, for whom a retweet is as good as a read, user reviews (especially if mum knows her way around Amazon), festival audiences, theatre audiences and even corporate audiences, but few solitary sessions with a reader. The writer is downloaded into the library of good intentions but never read." She also later adds "LOL, imagine linking SMS to literature" apparently unaware that writers have indeed published novels through tweets and texts since at least 2007.
    • Macken doesn't seem to be the only one failing to keep up with cultural developments. Scott Sterling at Digital Trends thinks much the same of the TBS show King of the Nerds. "We all knew someone like the contestants described above, but somewhere along the line, we became them. Comic-book movies dominate theaters and fan-fic tops best-seller lists. Coding is widely practiced. Almost every person uses a computer on a daily basis, and half of us carry one in our pocket. The fact that mainstream culture has adopted nerds and their activities as their own is no revelation. The point is not that nerds are cool, as any commentary of The Big Bang Theory seems to end with, but rather that King of the Nerds makes it painfully obvious that we’re all nerds, at least in the traditional sense of the word that anyone of a certain generation grew up with."

    What fandom changes have you seen during your time in it? Write about your experiences in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom investments

    By Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 26 February 2013 - 10:18pm
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    • In The birth of a fanboy, writer Larry Sukernik talks about the rationalization people use for their investments in something, as the seed that shifts them from consumer to fan. "[Once] you buy your first iPhone...you’re invested in Apple. Apple’s success is now your success, Apple’s failure is your failure. But why?" The reason is the continuation of the fandom product, because its loss will negatively impact your investment in it. "Not only does that leave you with an abandoned phone, but it also means that you made the incorrect phone choice. You made a bad decision, and you were wrong. Nobody wants to be wrong."
    • A look at Girls' Generation fandom also discussed financial investment in a fandom. The group is "enjoyed by people of all walks of life. But within that is where we start to see sharp differences in fans: not in their love, but in their wealth. While there are individuals with high-paying jobs and disposable income, there are also students with nothing but a meager allowance attempting to import relatively expensive albums from halfway across the world. It’s situations like this that make us ask, 'Does merchandise and money spent on the group measure a person’s dedication?'"
    • While the creation of fanworks has its costs, these days it increasingly has its rewards as well. Fanfiction contests are fairly common but one held by the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Library has a focus on fan crafts as well. "The contest was started seven years ago by an anime club that met at the library and has grown to more than 100 entries in the two categories" with fan art comprising any non-text entry. "[L]ibrarian John Hilbert said. 'Someone baked a cake in the shape of a cat. We had a tree skirt that ended up winning. It can be any medium as long as it can fit through the door.'"
    • Of course these days a fanwork might make money for someone other than the creator. A review of Spank: The Musical, a parody of Fifty Shades of Grey, "pokes fun at James’ writing process and her roots in fan fiction. The musical centers on a woman named E.B. Janet (Suzanne Sole), who spends a weekend penning a steamy love story." The play caters to its "audience of mostly women" with fanservice, even if they don't know the term. "When Hugh performed a Batman-themed strip tease, and E.B. describes him as having the jaw line of, 'a pre-weight gain Val Kilmer,' the audience squawked and squealed. In another scene, Hugh and Tasha play out a 'Home Improvement' skit that E.B. writes as part of the show’s fan fiction while taking a break from her book."

    What fanworks, financial issues and fan practices have caught your attention? Tell us about it in Fanlore. Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Do it yourself edition

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 24 February 2013 - 7:26pm
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    • TechDirt discussed the new site DMCAInjury.com, which was set up to keep track of bogus DMCA takedown requests. Those who file such claims could face punishment for those actions under section 512(f) of the DMCAbut so far it's happened rarely and with difficulty. Keeping track of accidental or malicious takedown requests might spur more cases against those filing them, or "at the very least, perhaps it will create a useful dataset to explore the nature and frequency of bogus DMCA takedowns."
    • The Daily Dot discussed the controversy over racist, homophobic, and sexist commentary found at GitHub, an open source code-sharing site used by many projects (including the AO3). "GitHub is a platform geeks and techies love because it not only lets you manage projects but allows you to share your code and your projects with the outside world." However, the sharing mentality doesn't mean all users are welcome. "GitHub sits in the center of an Open Source community that has been dealing with heated ongoing controversy over its lack of diversity. In November, BritRuby, a Manchester conference of Ruby on Rails coders, was canceled after outrage broke out online at its all-male lineup of panelists."
    • A post at TeleRead offered fans tips on formatting downloaded fanfic from Fanfiction.net and the AO3, noting that MOBI downloads from AO3 can create wide margins and non-functional tables of content. Flavorwire tips readers off to the availability of Giphy, a search engine for animated GIFs. "Even in the age of relatively mainstream blogs like What Should We Call Me, though, a glance at Giphy’s front page reveals that the site caters to the kind of dedicated fandoms that popularized the .GIF in the first place."
    • Lastly, former Board member Francesca Coppa will be speaking at the Midwest Archives Conference on April 18 about the OTW's work on the Fan Culture Preservation Project and the AO3. Her talk will discuss how fan works are "an alternative, subterranean literature and arts culture, and describe the many ways fans have worked over the years to distribute and preserve that culture through zine libraries, hand-coded on-line archives,[and] songtape circles."

    What tools do you think help keep fandom running? Tell us about it in Fanlore. Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Examining fan activities

    By Claudia Rebaza on Friday, 22 February 2013 - 8:42pm
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    • A post on The MarySue took a more psychological look at the "Fake Geek Girl" syndrome. "The theory of microaggressions was developed back in the 70′s to denote racial stereotyping, but was expanded by psychologist Derald Wing Sue, Ph.D. in 2007 to encompass a wide variety and classifications of these subtle and seemingly harmless expressions that communicate 'hostile, derogatory, or negative slights and insults' toward people who aren’t members of the ingroup. These outgroup members might include women, racial/ethnic minorities, LBGT members, and others historically marginalized in our community." Author Dr. Andrea Letamendi explained the anger such behavior can engender. "The feelings of being threatened, invalidated, and overlooked can happen to any one of us in this community–some psychologists argue that when the threats are ambiguous or subtle (like microaggressions), they can be more damaging because there is no certainty and the assault is denied or ignored."
    • More complaints about sexism arose in response to a documentary on Bronie fandom. "What do you get when fans decide to make a documentary about their own fandom? In the case of the Bronies—fans of My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic—the answer seems to be erasure and exclusion. So say some fandom critics of the recently released documentary Bronies: The Extremely Unexpected Adult Fans of My Little Pony. Not everyone in the Brony fandom is happy about the newly launched documentary. Female fans are already planning their own documentary in response, to give a more inclusive portrayal of fans—particularly the female sector of the Brony population, which many fans claim was virtually ignored."
    • Another fan documentary fundraising on Kickstarter will be focusing on the makers of fan films. In a chat with OTW staff, co-producer Joey Rassool discussed the project's focus. "We hope to show several things: 1) Why fan films tend to be more accurate to the source material than their hollywood equivalents, 2) Why even greatly funded fan films still end up with problems, 3) What these creators, especially the ones working out of their own pockets, have to sacrifice to bring their art to life, and 4) What kind of person is willing and capable of making those sacrifices." Asked how he thought a view of fan film makers might map onto the work that other fans do in other mediums, he replied "I find that film is a shockingly tricky art form for fan made content because of the amount of time, energy, people, and finances that have to go into it to generate a final product. But I hope that our film can show everyone that creates fan based content that any amount of effort is worth it for the final result." They also plan to focus on how fans "manage the aspects of filmmaking. Most fan films are made by crews and directors with little to no big budget experience, and the introduction of crowd funding can put a lot of money into some fairly unseasoned hands. This means that things can go wrong at almost any turn."

    What examinations of My Little Pony, fangirls or fandoms have caught your attention? Tell us about it in Fanlore. Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Living with fanfiction

    By Claudia Rebaza on Wednesday, 20 February 2013 - 7:30pm
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    • An article from the Oakland Tribune provided a good exploration of fanfiction and the activities of people who write it. "The online communities -- fandoms -- are vast and develop their own guidelines, techniques and even vocabularies. People write about, talk about, have mini conventions about, make videos about and even edit each other's stories about everything from favorite novels, TV shows and comic books to Japanese anime and mangas, poems, video games or popular songs...'It's really big, it's really diverse, and if you've only seen one little slice of it, you haven't seen anything.'" The piece also featured discussion with OTW Legal Chair Betsy Rosenblatt, and mentions OTW projects the AO3 and Fanlore.
    • Meanwhile Transformative Works and Cultures editor Karen Hellekson discussed how varied fanfiction can be in The Eye. "'Although I’m glad that Fifty Shades of Grey has caused interest in the fan fiction phenomenon, I also worry that the prurient, overtly sexual, often violent nature of the text reflects badly on fan fiction in general, because it’s not representative of fan fiction or the impetus to write it.' Fans are inspired to write fiction in order to continue experiencing a text, its characters, and settings. Often, they write for themselves and for fellow fans, with no pretensions of achieving fame comparable to their source texts’ authors. Fan fiction’s forays into the worlds of publishing and academia, however, show that it is a broader cultural phenomenon that appeals to more than the fans alone."
    • In a review of Batman comics on PopMatters, Michael D. Stewart talks about how uncertain canons can make all stories seem like fanfiction. "Many of the writers currently writing our major superheroes are fans of the characters. They’re not the original creators of the character, so what’s the difference between fan fiction and what is being published today? Sophistication? Editorial endorsement and inclusion in canon? A paycheck?...[I]n terms of the culture talking to them and they responding in its language, “Death of the Family” and Snyder’s Joker is not “almost” fan fiction, it is fan fiction and that’s something he should be proud of. While I have been wary about the amount of horror that has been injected into Batman, and concerned the Joker hasn’t to this point been very funny, and that each and every issue hasn’t been an ideal portrayal, I will always be appreciative knowing a fan is writing this cornerstone of comics."
    • Whether fan fiction writers are or aren't going pro, they still have to deal with some similar issues. Fandom Wanderers decided to offer some advice, a lot of which related to dealing with one's audience. "You can’t please everyone – in every story, you will have at least one reviewer who says “Can you make … happen?” If that happens to fit with your storyline and you want to, go ahead. If not, don’t. It’s your story, not theirs" but also "Be grateful to your reviewers – A lot of people lurk on fanfiction sites – I know, I’m guilty of it myself – and you can’t always tell if they’ve enjoyed the story...So when you get a review, thank that person...If it’s a particularly long and helpful review, take the time to message them and let them know that you’re grateful for their feedback."

    What fanfiction habits and activities do you take part in? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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