News of Note

  • OTW Fannews for 20 September 2012

    By Claudia Rebaza on Thursday, 20 September 2012 - 4:16pm
    Message type:

    The Links Roundup posts are getting a new name! The Communications Committee has been using the #OTWFannews hashtag for them at Twitter for a while as it's a more distinctive name for the series and a clearer name for their content. OTW Fannews is meant to be a selective look at discussions of fandom, and issues affecting fans, in both traditional and non-traditional media venues. It also includes interviews where OTW staffers and volunteers have taken part, or discussions of the organization appear.

    Here's a roundup of women in fandom stories that might be of interest to fans:

    • CNN's Geek Out! blog ran an excerpt from Rob Salkowitz's book on the commercial side of pop culture. "Many of today’s best online comic and fantasy-genre news sites and discussion groups were started by, and remain powered by, women. Today, there are increasing numbers of proud girl geeks of all ages; I count myself fortunate to be married to one. Crowds at conventions and even some comics stores now reflect a much more equal gender balance. As for the comics industry itself, not so much." He concluded that the future of comics was likely to favor women. "Typically, female comics fans who speak out on this issue from a feminist perspective are roundly and rudely shouted down, sometimes from the podium. It’s hard to imagine a more self-defeating strategy for the long-run health of the industry. Women today are the loudest and most compelling voices in fandom; young girls are making some of the most popular self-published comics. Decades from now, Twilight will be fondly remembered (or ironically inflected) nostalgia for millions of middle-aged women, some of whom will be able to look back on the shared communal experience of sleeping out for days at Comic-Con and having had the time of their young lives."
    • Tracey Sinclair at Fanboy Unleashed wrote about a recent round of geek credential checking and declared "There seems increasingly to be the idea that there is some level of arcane knowledge required to be a ‘proper’ geek, but only, of course, if you have a vagina. Nobody’s calling the guy dressed as Thor a fake – hell, it wouldn’t matter if he couldn’t spell Thor, nobody would think to question that he belonged there. But there is still an ingrained suspicion that girls aren’t really geeks – or, if they are, they should look a certain way, and dress a certain way. Dare not to fit into a category you had no input in defining, and you’re a ‘fake’." Writing for the St. Louis Post Dispatch, Aisha Sultan makes it clear that this treatment is not limited to geek fandoms or to adult women.
    • Certainly women tend to get little support from content creation companies. While Ashley Eckstein's Her Universe company provides a stereotypically feminine product -- fashionable clothes -- her observation of the sexism behind the dearth of such material was all business. "'I think we are now starting to wake up and say 'no, we don’t want to deal with this anymore' and if we do speak up, people will listen and it’s becoming more accepted to like sci-fi from a social standpoint,' said Eckstein. 'We finally opened our mouths.'...According to Eckstein, a number of companies told her that female fans just aren't interested in and don't buy science fiction and similarly themed merchandise...'We said we'll prove you wrong,' asserted the actress, 'and we did.'"
    • Some people seem to feel that if they can't stop the presence of women, they can stop voices supporting them from being heard. The Daily Dot reported that Sam Killerman's Gamers Against Bigotry website was hacked. "Where 1,500 people once pledged to curb their sexist, racist, Ableist, and homophobic language during gaming, hackers have inserted NSFW images like Goatse. Killerman said he’s been unable to restore the pledge page permanently, but users are continuing to sign it in the gaps between takedowns." Fortunately, panels at conventions are a little harder to disrupt, such as the Sexism in Anime Fandom panel at Otakon (no transcript available).

    If you've been a woman in fandom, share your experiences at Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Links roundup for 16 September 2012

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 16 September 2012 - 9:37pm
    Message type:

    Here's a roundup of fanfiction stories that might be of interest to fans:

    • AfterEllen stepped up to explore "Why smart lesbians read (and write) fan fiction." They write, "We lose ourselves in stories, but we also find ourselves in stories. Fan fiction isn't just a way for us to gay-up straight characters (or sex-up gay characters); it's an exercise in molding narratives that resonate with our unique life experiences. Fan fiction readers and writers aren't waiting for networks and showrunners to hand them a beautiful bouquet of freshly picked roses. They're planting their own gardens and fertilizing their own imaginations and pruning and weeding and growing something proud and strong. They may have borrowed the seeds, but the blossoms are all their own."
    • A post at the i.b.taurus blog also took issue with the idea of focusing only on the sex in fanfiction while overlooking the gender issues. While discussing the practice of kink memes, writer Hannah Elison points out how "journalists continue to paint fanfiction as a world of ‘creepy’ anonymous erotica, despite erotic work making up a small percentage of stories" while "they ignore the fact that though these stories may unashamedly portray acts of bdsm, intersexuality and even bestiality, they have yet to escape the ever-present force of dominant gender paradigms."
    • An NPR look at the origins of Fifty Shades of Grey managed to avoid a discussion of the sexual, but neither did it provide much on the topic of fanfiction at all. OTW Staffers Suzanne Scott and Francesca Coppa provided some input, but the focus remained rather firmly on E.L. James.
    • A better look at fanfiction appeared in The Boston Globe. While it focused on that other favorite topic, copyright, the disclaimer "Full disclosure: I write and read fan fiction as a hobby" may account for the observation that "Yes, the vast majority of fan fiction falls woefully below such lofty standards [as Shakespeare]. But so does most original writing, particularly the self-published kind — and some fan-written stories would hold their own against much professional fiction. (Granted, “Fifty Shades of Grey” is appallingly bad, but then “Twilight” is no “Jane Eyre,” either.)"

    If your fanfiction focuses on the sexual, the copyright, or just the fun, why not write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Links roundup for 14 September 2012

    By Claudia Rebaza on Friday, 14 September 2012 - 2:53pm
    Message type:

    Here's a roundup of stories about documenting your sources that might be of interest to fans:

    • An article about fanfic history published in The Guardian raised a lot of commentary from readers and writers across the blogosphere. Making Light took issue with the "section on fanfic in early SF fandom" calling it "full of nonsense, so much so as to call the rest of the article into question." Oddly, nowhere in Morrison's lengthy piece covering hundreds of years of history, as well as obscure terminology and ad-hoc psychological assertions about the writers' motives, were any sources for the article cited. Also omitted was any discussion of who was doing much of the writing -- something rectified by Foz Meadow's article at the Huffington Post. "Not long ago, I wrote a piece on why YA sex scenes matter -- in a nutshell, because they're pretty much the only form of sex-positive, female-centric sexiness on the market. In that context, then, the fact that the vast majority of fan fic writers are understood not only to be women, but young women -- something Morrison utterly fails to mention -- cannot help but be intensely relevant to any discussion of sex in fan fic. Culturally, we've spent thousands of years either denying, curbing or vilifying the female sex drive, to the point that even now, the idea of pornography geared towards a female audience is still fundamentally radical." Such gender erasure also explains why female centered fan gatherings remain vitally important for fandom as a whole.
    • Certainly writer Jonah Lehre probably wishes fans weren't so concerned about documentation. As discussed by The Learned Fangirl, "Michael Moynihan, a huge Bob Dylan fan, asked the questions that we should all ask about where information comes from, and thereby caused the end (or at least the extreme shaming) of the career of a well-regarded writer." Yet the media hasn't learned much of a lesson from the incident. "But for all of the talk about how bloggers and tweeters aren’t 'real journalists', traditional journalists are on the hook for not appropriately citing to their sources. In a random sample, taken from Google news of highly cited and 'top news' stories on this situation, less than a quarter included a link to the Tablet story that broke this. Shameful!"
    • The Tor Publishing website recently gave a boost to a vid celebrating decades of fandom, though its fannishness was perhaps most clear in the meticulous tracking of its content. "Questions were crowd-sourced, moments were captured, and a lot of love ended up on the screen. They even have an incredible spreadsheet breakdown of exactly what went into the where, and why." Though the vid centered only on western visual media fandom, one would have to concur with "[w]hat better way to chronicle decades of geeky dedication than through a song chronicling decades of history?"

    If you want to contribute to the fannish culture of documentation, don't forget about Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Links roundup for 13 September 2012

    By Claudia Rebaza on Thursday, 13 September 2012 - 5:03pm
    Message type:

    Here's a roundup of legal and technology audio stories that might be of interest to fans:

    • The Baker Street Babes Podcast spoke with OTW Legal Committee member Betsy Rosenblatt about legal issues surrounding fanworks, what the OTW's Legal Advocacy project does, and what makes the AO3 different from other online spaces for fanfic (starting 13 minutes in). The podcast also includes more general musings on the nature of fandoms and the reasons fans want to create fanworks. (No transcript available).
    • Various segments relating to intellectual property have been airing on On the Media. Key among these were their interview with the author of Year Zero, a science fiction novel which revolved around how U.S. copyright laws would result in the annihilation of the planet (transcript available), and their segment on how advertising agencies support a musical fanfic industry to avoid paying copyright on the originals (transcript available). They also pointed out the alarming lengths to which corporate entities are going to control brand visibility: "Olympic copyright cops stood ready to enforce the sponsors’ marketing deals" in sporting venues and "London organizers gave businesses a list of key words to avoid" in any advertising. "[W]hat’s interesting about this law is it goes beyond [any] kind of copyright law. This actually introduces a criminal offense, so you could technically be criminally prosecuted. It’s really been described as some of the most draconian legislation in this area that’s ever been introduced." (Transcript available at the link.)
    • The measure of draconian lengths may have to keep being revised upwards though. In the past month the Scripps News Service instigated a YouTube takedown against NASA for its video of the landing of the Curiosity rover on Mars. (The video was later restored with an apology). But the effort to control Olympics discussion was less effective against Olympic fans online. The effort by fans at circumventing both broadcast network restrictions as well as national viewing restrictions was the subject of an NPR segment on proxy servers. As Electronic Frontier Foundation representative Mike Stoltz explained, this is the "technology that people use to bypass censorship of the Internet in countries like China and Iran. And it's used by people both in the U.S. and in other countries to watch TV on the Internet that they can't get where they are." Asked if the practice was ethical, Stoltz replied "I think doing something like this in order to avoid paying for something is unethical. Doing something like this to get content that you as a person in the U.S. cannot get any other way is not necessarily unethical, it's more practical." (Transcript available at the link.)

    Do you have a fannish technology or legal story to tell? Why not contribute it to Fanlore? Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Links roundup for 11 September 2012

    By Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 11 September 2012 - 4:41pm
    Message type:

    Here's a roundup of stories about the new face of fandom that might be of interest to fans:

    • Haddayr Copley-Woods summarizes the classic experiences of fandom with "Many people called me a nerd back in seventh grade, when I played Dungeons and Dragons and got picked last in gym. Now the word feels like an embrace." She encourages others to discover their tribe at a fan convention. "Sometimes, during a deeply intellectual panel on the work of Lloyd Alexander, you might have to raise your voice to compete with the sounds of a boisterous Klingon ritual going on in the courtyard below. But if you're a misfit, it will be worth it. You'll finally be home." The longstanding tradition of face-to-face meets is being seen today as a way to connect with a new generation, as in the case of Amarillo, Texas's comic book con organized by their local library.
    • Some fans have found themselves excluded from in-person gatherings in the past, though this too is changing. The L.A. Times noticed that Comic-Con "is seeing more gay-themed panels, parties, signings and off-site events than ever before," with one writer connecting canon acceptance to fandom presence. “Queer fandom is absolutely galvanized by seeing more accurate representations of ourselves." Another con-goer added that this new energy is present "[e]ven among non-queer fans. My super-straight guy friend is totally into this comic about queer bears.” Comments to the article however, showed we still have a long road to walk.
    • The road may be a lot shorter among fanfic writers who were called out in a video by Teen Wolf's most popular slash couple. They gave the writers and readers something to think about while encouraging them to vote for an award. Such fans were probably also on the minds of app developers at Movellas who created "an iPhone app just for fan fiction about boy-band One Direction." The reporting journalist's "sheer disbelief" is the only quaint thing about the story, which otherwise proves that fans will take their fandom connections with them wherever they go.

    Do you have a "future of fandom" story to tell? Why not contribute it to Fanlore? Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Can Fandom Change Society?

    By Claudia Rebaza on Monday, 10 September 2012 - 2:34pm
    Message type:

    The PBS production OffBook has created a new video about the spectrum of fannish behavior and motivations, and it features discussion from board members Francesca Coppa and Naomi Novik. The 7:20 minute video explores the diversity of fandom, the way its fanworks may challenge dominant views expressed in mass media, and fair use and its meaning for fans. The segment concludes with "Fandom lets many more people have a voice, and it lets many people tell stories that would otherwise not get heard." (No transcript available)

    This video was released within days of two other discussions about fandom and society:

    • Brett White writes in Comic Book Resources about women represented in comics and the vital role of women in fandom: "Women engage in fandom to levels that men do not. When women get behind something, their sheer numbers and passion force it into the mainstream." To that end he believes that "I want other people to be inspired. I'm a white male...I had my heroes who 'looked like me' and that I could identify with or aspire to be. I want girls to have that chance too. And as much as I want boys to see women as equals, I want girls to know that they don't have to identify with Disney Princesses or Really Cool Disney Channel Starlet if they don't want to. They can identify with Wasp and Invisible Woman or Kitty Pryde. They can be Stephanie Brown or Batwoman or Black Canary. They have as many awesome superheroes as their brothers do. Everyone needs female heroes as much as male ones."
    • Richard Just wrote in The Daily Beast that as American culture becomes increasingly politicized and polarized that sports fandom may be a neutral meeting ground, and thus a vitally important space for discussion and common cause.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Links roundup for 27 August 2012

    By Claudia Rebaza on Monday, 27 August 2012 - 8:44pm
    Message type:

    Here's a roundup of fandom celebration stories that might be of interest to fans:

    • A South by Southwest (SXSW) panel with OTW connections has been proposed for inclusion at the event's 2013 lineup. "Catching Fire? Or Not. Fans, Creativity & Fair Use" would include Joshua Wattles of deviantART, Inc., Flourish Klink of The Alchemists, Heidi Tandy of HP Education Fanon, Inc. (HPEF) and FAWC, Inc. and Lisa Bunker of the Pima County Public Library. "This panel will be a frank discussion about the laws that protect fan-creators of transformative works, the gray areas of copyright and fair use, why fan creativity is usually not infringement, and the issues that corporations will have when trying to capitalize on fan culture." (Visitors must create an account to vote for the panel proposal).
    • For a lot of fans, fandom doesn't end with their death -- at least not immediately. Filmmaker Errol Morris recently produced a short film titled Team Spirit about the funeral plans of hardcore fans. He probably should have included the obituary of baseball fan Marylou Belles. While acknowledging she was a fan of Stephen King, her loved ones noted "She was also a lifelong Mets fan, though surprisingly, that wasn't what killed her."
    • Given the strife that occurs in some fandoms, death-by-fannishness might not be so farfetched, but at least one member of Fringe fandom took to the Huffington Post to declare how welcoming it was. "The support I received was overwhelming. I was the new kid on the block but I was met with an incredible welcome. I continue to post my reactions after each episode because I love interacting with the show's fans. They have enriched my Fringe viewing experience. They shield me from spoilers and even created a Twitter hashtag (#HurryUpMary) to get me caught up by the season five premiere. How many fandoms treat their newbies like that?"
    • Of course, sometimes when fannish work crosses over to pro, the result doesn't make fans stand up and cheer. Such was the case with the Mortal Kombat fanfilm that became the officially sponsored web series "Legacy." However, in the sixth episode, fan creator, Tancharoen, stated that he was now given sole creative control and that it was written in the original style he had first envisioned. The result? "It was 10-times better than the previous five that I had struggled to sit through," said Jordan McCollam, writing for Gamebeat. McCollam then concluded, "I guess the main point I’m trying to make is this: Fan-made media is awesome, but it’s only awesome because it’s fan-made. Until making movies and television shows stops being about the money, and until studio heads stop feeling the need to pander to the lowest-common denominator, fan-made media will never have a home at major studios. Maybe we should just leave it alone, no matter how excited we are about a favorite franchise."

    If you've got things to celebrate about fandom, make sure they're remembered with an entry in Fanlore. Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Links roundup for 26 August 2012

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 26 August 2012 - 9:30pm
    Message type:

    Here's a roundup of fanfiction stories that might be of interest to fans:

    • MTV's recent announcement of a fan fiction contest for Teen Wolf fandom has had some fans contacting the OTW with concerns about the contest rules. While the content restrictions are pretty wide ranging, OTW Legal Chair Rebecca Tushnet notes that the language does not throw up the kind of concerns seen a few months ago in an audio contest hosted by Random House. She writes:

      "Crucially, it specifies that the rules apply to your entry, and don't require you to say that "all my fanworks are done only with permission" the way Random House did, so it has no effect on your ability to create other Teen Wolf fanworks. Here's the relevant language:

      Entrant shall retain all copyright in and to his/her Essay; provided, however that entrant agrees that by entering into this Contest he/she is granting Sponsor (and any and all of Sponsor’s subsidiaries and affiliates and affiliated broadcast stations and networks, successors and assignees and licensees) the non-exclusive, worldwide irrevocable right and license, but not the obligation, to exhibit, broadcast, copy, reproduce, encode, compress, encrypt, incorporate data into, edit, dub, superimpose, rebroadcast, transmit, record, publicly perform and distribute and synchronize in timed relation to visual elements, the Essays and/or any portions or excerpts thereof....

      This language is broad in what it lets MTV do with your entry, because MTV might not be sure exactly how it's going to deal with the winners. But the language is not broad in what it claims: you just gave MTV a license, and you can't take it back, but that's pretty much the minimum that MTV needs to be confident that it can promote the winning entries.

      One possibility is that they might incorporate your story into a later actual script, whether the story wins or not. A far more likely scenario: a submitted story is broadly similar to a storyline they were going to do anyway. In either case, this language prevents someone who submits a story from successfully suing MTV saying "you used my submission in your canon!" But this is probably a fair trade from the fan's side, though if you wrote for TV you might start to worry about what happens to your salary if this becomes common."

      In short, "Random House treated fan fiction like a foreign and risky thing it wanted to control, but there are alternatives even for official producers engaging with fans."

    • At least some in the press are not eager to see more fanfiction making its way across professional borders. In The Independent, columnist John Walsh acknowledges "It wouldn't do to be sniffy about works of fiction that feed off others. Literary history is full of important works that are shameless retellings of others." However there is still panic afoot. "But we might begin to wonder what has become of readers. Once they were content to read a book, enjoy the plot and feel warmth or dislike for the characters. Now, increasing numbers are driven to invade the book's pages, wrestle the characters away from their creator and provide their own plot twists. Most, of course, are wholly unequipped to write their own novel or to handle prose with much grace or vividness. But what happens if, in the free-for-all of online publication, a spin-off book starts to eclipse the original from which it derives?"
    • Sometimes, though, those original authors are interested when they have inspired others to create, as is the case with poet Sarah Kay whose work inspired a Teen Wolf fanfic hosted at the AO3. "A friend of mine forwarded me this link and it took me a while to figure out what was going on...this particular entry seems to be a piece based on the TV show “Teen Wolf.” The catch? This author finds a connection between some of the characters on the show and my poem “B.”...I have never seen Teen Wolf before, so I don’t know anything about any of the characters referenced, but the general concept of fan fiction fascinates me."

    If you're writing for yourself, others, or fanfic contests, why not include yourself in Fanlore? Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Links roundup for 24 August 2012

    By Claudia Rebaza on Friday, 24 August 2012 - 9:56pm
    Message type:

    Here's a roundup of issues in fandoms that might be of interest to fans:

    • One persistent problem fans have experienced revolves around their representation -- either in media stories on fans, or within the canons that they're fans of. Alyssa Rosenberg wrote about the latter, saying Hollywood decision makers think "it’s easier to sell white men as brawling gods than black men as hugely technologically advanced leaders of foreign nations", which leads some stories to cross media formats while others don't. In the meantime William Shatner hopes to defend fan practices to the media with his new documentary. "'These people who come to Comic-Con and dress up - all across the country, the rest of the population who doesn't understand are scoffing at them.'" But fans have their reasons. "'For a kid who is pathologically shy, dressing a cat up in a uniform -- [suddenly] he could speak. 'Captain Dave,' who is dying from Lou Gehrig's disease, lives through 'Star Trek.''" The media, or at least Variety continues to beg to differ.
    • When it comes to the press though, fans now have their own forums for speaking out about the slant given to press coverage. Indeed problems may arise when fans are also members of the press, as is the case for a CultureMob reporter who talks about making decisions on what to attend at ComicCon and for what purposes.
    • The fandom/media divide has been a topic at other sites, with some acknowleding the greater depth of fan knowledge while critiquing its objectivity. On gaming site GamaSutra this personal slant is blamed for blocking creativity among content producers. The respondents to the column were having none of it, with a rather good discussion ensuing about how the role of commercial interests were being ignored in the post.
    • Such a discussion would also have been welcome on the article of OTW staffer Aja Romano at The Daily Dot when she discusses the persistent problem of female erasure from fandom. Noting how rarely women are included in fan convention panels, or condescended when they are, she also explored other ways in which their participation is ignored in male dominated fandom spaces. "Take Kate Leth, author of popular webcomic Kate or Die. When a father told his daughter in her comic store, right in front of her, that there was 'nothing for her' in the store, she tweeted angrily, 'you bet yr ass I gave her a free comic.' Leth added, 'what am I, chopped liver?'"

    If you've got your own fandom issues to share, why not explore them on Fanlore? Additions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup at transformativeworks.org. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Links roundup for 21 August 2012

    By Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 21 August 2012 - 3:32pm
    Message type:

    Here's a roundup of pro intersections with fandom stories that might be of interest to fans:

    • While publishers have been putting out professional fanworks as long as commercial publishing has existed, they used to do all they could to separate themselves from the amateur version. Not anymore, apparently. Two recent examples occurred when Marie Claire excused a photoshopped cover of a non-consenting royal model as "fan art" and when Titan Books decided to promote a Supernatural tie-in novel as "fan fiction." This came in the same month as the actor who played The Punisher decided to make his own "fan film" as "a love letter to Frank Castle & his fans."
    • Historically, the movement from fan to pro generally went the other way with many an author going from fanfic to commercially published work. This is even more common now when they can go it alone and self-publish. One writer who stopped submitting to publishers said "'It’s entirely possible that I gave up too soon...But after hearing other writers’ experiences, I thought well, geez, I’m nearly 40 years old. Do I want to spend the next five to seven years pushing others to do the job for me when I could do it myself in the span of a month?'"
    • Indeed fanfic writers have various possibilities open to them, even if they do throw in their lot with a publishing house. For example, they could try publishing fanfic of previously published fanfic or simply making sure their canon is part of the public domain. "Total E-Bound has brought out an adaptation of a Sir Arthur Conan ­Doyle tale in which his celebrated detective Sherlock Holmes embarks on a gay relationship with his sidekick Dr Watson. The new version of Bronte’s Jane Eyre includes a graphic sex scene between Jane and Mr Rochester." The Clandestine Classics label will also "include ­Dracula, Treasure Island, Wuthering Heights, The Three Musketeers and Phantom Of The Opera."

    Have you gone pro? Do you have stories about those who have? Pop them into Fanlore which will always remain a fan-made, fan-run resource.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup at transformativeworks.org. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

Pages

Subscribe to News of Note