News of Note

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom ignited

    By Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 13 April 2013 - 6:06pm
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    • The Japan Times talked about the anime industry catching up to the online revolution. "Today the despised former pirates at Crunchyroll.com — a now-legal multilingual Web portal for non-Japanese anime fans — are leading an industry revolution in content delivery and distribution, and Japanese producers are following their lead. Heavyweight veterans such as Toei, Bandai, Sunrise and others are scrambling to preview and offer their titles internationally via streaming sites like YouTube, Hulu, Niconico and Netflix. A new producer-collaborative streaming anime site, Daisuki, sponsored in part by one of the world’s largest advertising agencies, Dentsu, goes live in April. And a Japan-based site for videos about Japanese pop culture called Waoryu debuted last month."
    • Stephanie Mlot claimed in PC Magazine that 2013 Is the Best Time To Be a Fangirl. Discussing the record breaking fundraising success for a Veronica Mars movie, Mlot discussed statistics. "This month's SXSW boasted 31 Kickstarter-backed movies, and Kickstarter co-founder Yancey Strickler said this week that 10 percent of the films that debuted at Sundance raised money on the site...The letter-writing campaigns of yore have given way to Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook, and Kickstarter movements, taking 'power to the people' to a more sophisticated, and often more effective level. Still, it's unlikely that crowd-funded entertainment will become the new normal. Hollywood can't, and won't, subside on scraps from even the wealthiest of adoring fans," in part because the costs for the typical film or television series are so high.
    • Her Universe, a creator of fannish women's apparel, has begun a Year of the Fangirl promotion, featuring women telling their fannish stories after being nominated by other fans. One of them, Tricia Barr, advised fans to find their voices. "I always believed women would come into our own in fandom. Powered by a surge of female fans coming to the fore, a female-led action movie ruled at the box office and the range of stories with strong female characters is becoming almost limitless in books, comics, movies, and television. Doors are opening for women specifically because they are fangirls...Voice your opinions, hopes, or desires about the stories that you feel passionate about. Respect that every other fan – including the ones creating those stories – brings their own unique perspective."

    If you have your own fannish history to share, write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • The OTW's 2012 Community Survey report is now available

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 31 March 2013 - 5:23pm
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    Last year the OTW ran a large survey to collect information from its user community about their use of our projects and awareness of our activities. There were 5,895 people who answered. Some early results were reported in the Survey Sunday posts on OTW News.

    A report of all the survey results is now complete and is available as a single report (5.65 MB PDF). Given that the survey contained 89 questions and all questions have one or more graphs, this is a long document (183 pages in all). However, it is broken down into sections for the various projects and also includes a cross-tabulated section. We hope it will make for an interesting read!

    For those who are interested, here is a look at the table of contents:

    About the Survey
    Locations and Languages
    Fannish Locations and Activities
    Archive of Our Own
    Fanlore
    Fan Video and Multimedia Projects
    Transformative Works and Cultures
    Legal Advocacy
    Open Doors
    OTW Membership
    OTW Awareness
    OTW Website
    Open-Ended Response
    Cross-Tabulated Responses
    Conclusion

    You can also find a complete list of the survey questions here.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanfiction's here to stay for everyone

    By Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 30 March 2013 - 12:04am
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    • The past months have produced a rash of discussions on fanfic ranging from the critical to the deeply personal. The Telegraph kicked this off with a complaint about derivative works. "To take entirely against fan fiction is pointless, not least because it’s clearly here to stay...Nor is being derivative necessarily a sin – after all, the writer who tries to create work from inside an influence-free vacuum would probably never type a single word." However, using someone else's building blocks and using only those blocks are "the difference between writing that pays homage to another’s work, and writing that robs that work wholesale of plot, theme and characters."
    • A good example of how fanfiction is "clearly here to stay" appeared on the posting boards of Shadow Era where an official policy was posted. "Time and time again references are made of fears that you will be somehow punished for the writing of Fan-Fiction. Often we've been asked to reveal the 'Official Stance' on these works, so here it is: We love it. Fan-Fiction is created when members of a community love the game, and that's what we see in these creations...For that reason, we've reached out to a website specializing in this specific genre. Fanfiction.Net now list Shadow Era as an actual category...so anything you create can be viewed by more people than ever!"
    • The London Review of Books had an ambivalent view from a fanfic reader. "The first time I told anyone I read fan fiction was just a few months ago. My roommate’s response was: ‘So? I do too.’ I kept my habit a secret for so long because it seemed immature and embarrassing. But by the time I told her I had stopped spending so much time online. I got bored with having to scroll through tens of misspelled summaries to find just one story that sounded appealing." But it seems she has a way to go yet before putting fanfic behind her. "During those years, every attempt to curb my obsession failed, and even now, although my accounts have gone untended and my email updates have been halted, I still can’t quite give it up...Every so often, I spend some time browsing in new, different fandoms, changing the preferences one by one and then scrolling down to the white space at the end of the page. I am not sure what I am looking for."
    • Another writer was clearer about her motivations and more reflective about fannish culture. "When I decided on an academic career I stopped writing fiction altogether, so by the time I found fanfiction I hadn’t written any fiction in about five or six years...I really shouldn’t have ever stopped. The passion was draining out of me for academia, but it was rushing back in when it came to fiction." Regarding slash, she had more to relate than a sheepish attraction. "Our culture has learned lies about women’s sexuality from actual porn and men expect women to act it out as if it’s real. So if erotic fanfiction makes men uncomfortable, I say, so be it. They should learn to cope. Girls have their own sexual imaginations and their own pleasures, so I think it’s perfectly fine for them to have it. Fanfiction communities that centre on slash and erotica, or even 'porn', are self-catering in that regard. It’s mostly women fueling the emotional and sexual imaginations of other women. Are we going to be prudes about this and get upset about it? Think it shouldn’t happen? In a world where women’s sexuality is still defined by images created by and for men?"

    What milestones exist in your own fanfiction history? Put them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom's role in creation

    By Claudia Rebaza on Wednesday, 27 March 2013 - 12:31am
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    • At Slate, Tammy Oler lauds writer Hugh Howey's approach to dealing with fans in a piece discussing the success of his self-published sci-fi novel. "Most intriguingly, Howey has encouraged readers who want to develop their own Wool stories to self-publish and sell their works. In an interview, I asked Howey about why he’s not just encouraging fan fiction but actually endorsing it. 'There’s room for readers to become writers and play in this world,' he said. 'I view fan fiction as the opportunity to teach readers how much joy there is in creating worlds instead of just living in them.' Right now—much to Simon and Schuster’s chagrin, one has to imagine—the first two of what are sure to be many Wool-related fan fiction stories are available for sale on Amazon."
    • BookRiot hosted a guest piece by writer Jill Guccini who pondered how to evaluate professional/fan collaborations. "So here’s the question: Is this unbelievably cool and innovative? Or is it simply, as the AV Club called it, 'a dizzying cycle of mutual promotion and self-promotion?' Can it be both? Fandom is a more sprawling, often intimate, force now than it ever has been before in every variety of the arts, including books. I used to know authors simply by, you know, what books they wrote; I now gauge a lot of them in my head unwittingly by their social media personalities. And sometimes they reblog the same things I reblog; sometimes they follow me back; and they become weirdly closer, somehow, to That Guy I Went to High School With, as opposed to The All Mysterious Author. Essentially: the fourth wall has already been broken. So does authors reaching out to fans enrich the literary world? Or does it cheapen it? Alternately, does a corporate-sponsored, preconceived interactive project still count as 'reaching out'?"
    • Aja Romano over at the Daily Dot is also concerned about how fans are valued in these interactions, and writes about the way they are spoken of in SXSW panel blurbs. "[F]andom itself is growing to be synonymous with geek culture as a whole—both of which are seeping inexorably into the mainstream. That’s a huge reversal from where things stood even a few years ago, and not everyone is quite on board with this change. We can see this anxiety in the very language two of this week’s SXSW panels use to summarize the fan/creator relationship." Questioning the panelists on 'Frenemies: Fanning the Flames of Fandom' and 'Creators vs Audience: Next Chapter in Storyteling', she notes "the introductory angle that both panels take seem to pit fans and creators against one another, rather than as potential partners in a relationship built around shared love for a story."

    Share your own stories about fan and creator collaborations on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanworks and the public domain

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 24 March 2013 - 4:08pm
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    • Posting on Mondaq, a legal, regulatory and financial commentary site, law firm Duane Morris offered advice to people about paying more attention to Terms of Service language at the sites where they post. "Smash Pictures produced a porn/adult movie entitled Fifty Shades of Grey: A XXX Adaptation. A predictable result was a lawsuit by Fifty Shades Limited and Universal City Studios, who own rights to the book franchise and movies respectively...the defendants raised an intriguing argument in Counterclaim, namely that the copyrights in the Fifty Shades of Grey books are invalid -- and free for everyone to use -- because 'as much as 89% of the content of the allegedly copyrighted materials grew out of a multi-part series of fan fiction called Masters of the Universe based on Stephanie Myer's Twilight novels'...So a distinctive point in the case was the role of the fan fiction site's user terms of service. Such contracts are a kind of Super-IP right in which the normal boundaries of copyright can be expanded and rights apportioned."
    • OTW Legal Committee staffer Heidi Tandy said the following about the case: "The current Terms of Use at Fanfiction.net [www.fanfiction.net/tos/] does not state that any uploaded work loses its copyright, is placed in the public domain or is abandoned by the writer; accordingly, we do not believe that merely uploading a fic to FFN places it in the public domain, given that an author has to take specific steps when abandoning the copyright in a work."
    • Legal staffer Rebecca Tushnet pointed to details from another case involving commercial but transformative use. "In one recent case, the plaintiff, Keeling, created a parody version of the film Point Break, [called] 'Point Break LIVE!' The parody stemmed from recreating the storyline of the original film — about an FBI agent who goes undercover to take down a group of surf-loving bank robbers — using amusingly unrealistic props and staging, and putting an unrehearsed audience member in the key role of the FBI agent...The lawsuit began when the defendants, after a dispute with [Keeling], started staging their own version of 'Point Break LIVE!' They obtained a license from the owners of the rights to Point Break, but none from Keeling, and argued that she had no valid copyright because her version was an unauthorized infringing work. The court, and a subsequent jury, found that she had established that her version was fair use. Therefore it had its own independent copyright, which the defendants infringed."
    • Creativity Tech posted Fan Fiction and the Limits of Copyright and referred fans to the OTW. "If you’re confused, rest assured that you’re not the only one. The rules related to fan fiction and 'fair use' are not hard and fast. They’re fluid and uncertain. As I said before, they’re also determined on a case by case basis. If you’re a fan writer, just be careful about how and where you distribute your work. You might also be interested in consulting the Organization for Transformative Works. The organization offers information and resources."

    If you've got your own cases of fair use and parody works to share, write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: The role of fandom

    By Claudia Rebaza on Friday, 22 March 2013 - 11:06pm
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    • A post on fan site Fringenuity focusing on the life of a show after it ends contained a quote from actor Joshua Jackson. In it, he placed the work of content creators as a sort of prequel to the later life it lives in its fandom community. "I think there will probably be a lot of fan fiction. Maybe there will be even some sort of filmed addendum to the show or televised or podcasts or however it manifests itself, but I feel like the afterlife of Fringe is the test case for how modern cult shows are going to live on after they go off the air.”
    • The New York Times wrote about how fandom visibility doesn't just change the afterlife of a project, but perceptions about its current importance. "The sudden roar around 'Fast & Furious 6' reflects not only the unusual and overlooked strengths of the series, but also the value in Hollywood of cultivating an online fan base. Universal was able to light its Internet brush fire because it has spent years working to make fans feel a sense of ownership in the series."
    • The long-term effect of some fandoms could be seen in The Sydney Morning Herald's piece on a dance which "interprets the fan fiction spawned by the 2004 film Alien vs Predator." Writing about choreographer Larissa McGowan, the article states "What she does have is a killer instinct for what mash-up culture can bring to the world of contemporary dance. McGowan's 15-minute work Fanatic is an homage to two of sci-fi's enduring big-screen series and to the legions of rabid fans who obsess over Hollywood's war of the franchises, which began with Alien vs Predator in 2004. It was one of the hits of last year's Spring Dance festival at the Sydney Opera House."
    • The Chicago Reader discussed modern aspects of fandom in a look at the Beatles White Album. "What's really interesting is how spontaneously emergent it is. If you wrap a Beatles record in a plain white sleeve, a certain percentage of listeners will naturally use it as the platform for their own visual interpretations. Humans raised in the modern media-rich environment seem to almost instinctively want to interact with the cultural artifacts that they love by creating more artifacts in various media. The extent of that drive is only recently becoming clear, as the Internet has begun connecting creatively minded devotees of specific cultural properties into the massive, noncanonical content-generating hive mind known collectively as 'fandom.'" The article links to Fanlore when it concludes "The Japanese, who remain the gold standard for obsessive fandom, have a name for this: niji sousaku, literally, 'secondary creation.'"

    Link to your own definitions and descriptions in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Public challenges and social tagging

    By Claudia Rebaza on Wednesday, 20 March 2013 - 5:44pm
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    • A thesis written about the AO3's tagging system "attempts to begin exploring the question of what kind of environment the site's particular blend of open social tagging and some behind-the-scenes vocabulary control, plus hierarchical linking, creates for the users who search through it for fiction." The study, conducted in 2012, had a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods and the survey was completed by 116 people. "The current online information glut calls for some sort of subject labeling to facilitate efficiency in searching, but the volume of information is well beyond a size that could ever be dealt with by information professionals. “Social tagging” is an approach to this problem that lets non-professionals attempt to organize online information via tagging, for their own and one another's use. But social tagging is a new and rapidly evolving field, and so no consensus has yet been reached on its overall usefulness, or on what best practices might be."
    • Two rather different stories about fan video game makers were in the news recently. TechDirt summed things up in its post title: "Makers Of Firefly 'Fan-game' Abuse DMCA To Try To Silence Critic". "While I think that these kinds of games should be allowed...it appears that DarkCryo -- a company that is really skirting a pretty fine line concerning copyright -- decided to abuse the DMCA and file a takedown notice on [a critic's] posting of a DarkCryo logo image."
    • The other story was a little more typical, discussing how "Hasbro halts production of unauthorized "My Little Pony" video game". "This isn't the first time Hasbro has issued successful takedown notices for clearly illegal uses of its product, or even the first time it's taken down an MLP-inspired game. Previous instances where Hasbro has stepped in include the illegal download website Ponyarchive and the popular, though short-lived,multiplayer game MLP Online. Hasbro also took down the abridged series Friendship is Witchcraft, which should have been protected under under the Fair Use copyright clause afforded to transformative works within the U.S. However, issues of copyright and trademark are separate concerns with separate legal justifications. While Hasbro has so far been tolerant of copyright-protected fanwork such as fanart and fanfiction, it seems to have a rigid policy forbidding reuse of its official images and trademarks."
    • Some authors decided to challenge the claims of long dead creators' estates and, as the New York Times pointed out, highlighted a schism in the Sherlock Holmes fandom. "The suit, which stems from the estate’s efforts to collect a licensing fee for a planned collection of new Holmes-related stories by Sara Paretsky, Michael Connelly and other contemporary writers, makes a seemingly simple argument. Of the 60 Conan Doyle stories and novels...only the 10 stories first published in the United States after 1923 remain under copyright. Therefore, the suit asserts, many fees paid to the estate for the use of the character have been unnecessary. But it’s also shaping up to be something of what one blogger called 'a Sherlockian Civil War.'" The battle was laid out as being between the old guard (and, until recently, male only) Baker Street Irregulars versus the Baker Street Babes, "a group of young female Sherlockians who host a regular podcast."

    What legal and technology fan stories do you have an interest in? Add them to Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanfic paint by numbers

    By Claudia Rebaza on Monday, 18 March 2013 - 4:29pm
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    • Some entertainment creators like Dan Harmon have fanfiction writers in mind when it comes to their work. Discussing his departure from the beloved show Community, he said "“So, in the immediate wake of it, I was sitting on a linoleum, fluorescent-lit floor outside a dirty little lost-luggage office, with my head between my knees...It probably looked like I was sad, but I think you would have assumed it was because I lost my luggage.” But “I just kept thinking, ‘This is going to be a bummer for the people who get tattoos of the characters, the people who write poems about them, who write fan fiction — they’re the ones that are going to suffer’. ”
    • Other entertainers are thinking of what fanfiction can do for them -- albeit for a good cause. An article on Wetpaint discussed how Vampire Diaries actor Matt Davis wrote fanfic to defend rhinos. "The Cult star was recently inspired to spread the word about the endangered and vulnerable rhinos through his fanfiction, starring Stefan (Paul Wesley), Elena (Nina Dobrev), and Damon (Ian Somerhalder)."
    • In Neil Gaiman's case there was some collaborative work being done with fans, though he took over the writing part. As reported by The Mary Sue, Gaiman wrote stories based on fan tweets as part of a marketing collaboration with Blackberry. His "collaboration is back to the public again, as folks are invited to make art (and eventually videos) of all kinds in response to his twelve little fictions. Some of the artwork will be featured especially in a limited edition book."
    • Other entities, however, are in full-on profit mode. There were various articles over a month's time that promoted search-and-replace fanfic novels by a company marketing "personalized erotic and romance novels." One featured vampires in "a modern retelling of The Odyssey" while another was trumpeted by the National Review as an erotic novel about Barack and Michelle Obama. Surprisingly, the articles tended to focus more on who could be featured in the books than the business model itself.

    What ways have you seen fanfic used in or out of the marketplace? Post about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fannish expectations

    By Claudia Rebaza on Monday, 11 March 2013 - 6:07pm
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    • Peter Guttierez wrote in School Library Journal that "[T]here’s probably no single better way to teach online citizenship to young people than through their participation in organized fandom." To him this involved a behavior checklist because "fans must take into account not just the short-term value of making a point or having the last word, but their long-term relationships with their fellow fans." Some of them include "Am I “adding value” through this interaction, either to an individual or to the wider community? Or am I making this online conversation almost entirely about myself?" and "Am I considerate of others’ privacy and safety?"
    • Other writers are concerned with the expectations fans have of celebrities. The Japan Times reported on the spectacle of Japanese pop star Minami Minegishi shaving her head in apology for having a relationship. "The deeper truth is that idol fan culture, as well as the closely related anime and manga fan culture, is institutionally incapable of dealing with independence in young women. It seeks out and fetishizes weaknesses and vulnerabilities and calls it moé, it demands submissiveness, endless tearful displays of gratitude, a lack of confidence, and complete control over their sexual independence...The danger is of this fantasy creeping out more widely into society: Japan currently ranks at 101 in the world gender-equality rankings (79 places below the United States, 32 below China, and two below Azerbaijan)."
    • The Telegraph wrote about fans' need to fix plot holes. "The web has made this stuff mainstream, but it’s not new: fans of Arthur Conan Doyle have been engaged in “higher criticism” since at least 1928, when Monsignor Ronald Knox published Studies in the Literature of Sherlock Holmes. His fellow “Sherlockians” have since built up a remarkable body of analysis, raising (and resolving) textual problems such as the fact that Watson’s war wound is in his shoulder in A Study in Scarlet, but in his leg in The Sign of Four. To some fans, simply calling it a continuity error, an author’s mistake, is not good enough. The psychologist Simon Baron Cohen says such people have “systematising brains”, good at finding and applying logical rules. To them, these moments of illogic stick out jarringly."
    • A cancelled show has never meant the end to fanfiction, but perhaps creators are more aware that fans will be on the lookout for more content. In the case of Luck "John Perrotta, the show's producer/story editor and a racing industry pro, is writing a teleplay-style blog for the website America's Best Racing that tells "an imagined racetrack-based story, an ongoing saga, which includes some of the characters depicted in the ill-fated 'Luck' series." The work will also be illustrated.

    What fannish expecations have caught your attention? Post about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Authors talk fanfic and fandoms

    By Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 9 March 2013 - 8:52pm
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    • The Salt Lake Tribune talked fanfiction misconceptions with newly published author Christina Hobbs, who says it's a mistake to think "[t]hat there’s a specific type of people who read and write fan fiction — scientists, business professionals, teachers and people who are well-educated to people who haven’t gone to college are all part of it. It’s not just women. It’s not just men. It’s not a certain age group. You have this huge group of people who want to write and read for others, and that’s what’s so amazing about it."
    • Another published fanfic writer, Sam Starbuck, had this answer to the same question: "I've been in fandom almost twenty years, and not only have stereotypes presumably changed in that span of time, but the composition of fandom certainly has." Talking about the inside perspective, he adds, "We tend to see fandom as a single cohesive unit, because we are part of a unit within fandom, and we think fandom is our unit—and some people think fandom reflects the real beliefs of people who aren't in fandom, as well. But I don't think that's necessarily the case. Without even touching on the world outside of fandom, fandom itself is wider and louder and more diverse than any one person generally suspects. I do think I fit a fandom mold in a lot of ways—enthusiastic, nerdy, intelligent, awkwardly socialized—but so do plenty of people who aren't in fandom."
    • Author Victoria Schwab wrote about fans' questions on continuing content. "It’s no secret that the hottest books selling right now started out as fan fiction. It’s no secret because it’s plastered all over the internet, and in the stores. Some books own it, and some books would rather not. The latter claim that while they might have had the seeds of their story in another (and really, aren’t most books inspired by elements of one sort or another) their stories no longer resemble their inspiration...And I think it’s being complicated by other endeavors–such as the Cassie Clare, Sarah Rees Brennan, Maureen Johnson collaboration–that encourage the communal nature of a story."
    • Many a literature class has focused on dissecting what the author meant to say in their work, but a new one instead uses the book as a jumping off point to examine the world. ""The Fifty Shades Trilogy" is a three-credit, 300-level American Studies course at American University focusing on Fifty Shades of Grey." The packed course "involves studying personality disorders, eating disorders, sexual addiction, abuse, the evolution of Internet fan fiction and trends like the increase in sales related to BDSM paraphernalia. Public relations and marketing topics also comprise one-third of the course's curriculum."

    What fanfic authors' discussions have caught your attention? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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