值得注意的新闻

  • OTW Fannews: Academic takes on fandom

    Claudia Rebaza on Thursday, 8 August 2013 - 6:01pm
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    • New York City's Museum of the Moving Image is hosting a presentation on vidding given by former board member Francesca Coppa, titled "Remix Before YouTube." The presentation is on Friday, August 9 at 6:30 p.m. in the Video Screening Amphitheater.
    • Drew Emanuel Berkowitz writes in School Library Journal about Fanfiction: What Educators Really Need to Know. "It wasn’t too long ago that educators believed writing stories based on television shows, movies, comic books, cartoons, and video games was “nonacademic”, “frivolous”, and even “inappropriate” for K-12 public schools. Recently, however, a growing number of teachers and librarians...have written about their successful attempts to bring fanfiction writing into their classrooms." Yet some educators "worry that in-school fan practices might not be able to maintain the qualities that have made out-of-school fan practices so appealing."
    • Austenprose provided a review of the book Among the Janeites: A Journey Through the World of Jane Austen Fandom, by Deborah Yaffe. "After the lively introduction which explores her motivations for writing the book, it is broken down into three parts, much like dramatic structure of Austen’s three volume novels. Within the ten chapters one or two different personalities in the Janeite world are featured as an example of the diversity of Austen’s fans and how they express their passion."

    What academic takes on fandom have you seen? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Jumping to conclusions

    Claudia Rebaza on Wednesday, 7 August 2013 - 4:14pm
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    Tardis in space with three actor photos

    • Longtime fans are fairly familiar with the variety of judgments they're subject to for their hobbies, but these don't only come from outside their fandoms. A recent post on Hypable discussed congoing and how it seems a step too far for some. "All this time, I thought the people who went to Harry Potter conventions were weirdos or nerds who didn’t have much else to occupy themselves with. After the trip to the TVD Con in Chicago though, I’m almost in mourning that I missed out on all the early HP conventions. I’ve learned that at these events, you can be a giant nerd if you want to...I’m jealous that I missed the opportunity to go to some of the first conventions, or that I didn’t go to the midnight book release parties, even if I would have been the oldest person there."
    • Unleash the Fanboy hosted a post criticizing anger at casting choices. "Predictably, even the hint of casting against type has lead to the repetition of a depressingly familiar conversation, the conversation that happens any time there is a chance of changing a character’s race or gender or sexual orientation or whatever...The more I hear people make this criticism, the more difficult it becomes for me to pretend as if there is anything to it besides an open sewer of raw bigotry." This is because the "characters we love are not solid objects: they are constellations of ideas."
    • Of course sometimes assumptions do come from outside fandoms. The UK's Daily Mail discussed another study on gamer demographics which came to the unsurprising conclusion that women spend as much time on games as men, and that gamers are generally older, married, have children, and are socially engaged with others when they game. "A spokesman for Pixwoo.com added: 'This snapshot into the lives of ordinary gamers disputes many myths about the pastime, showing how integrated gaming is into our daily routine.'"
    • Writing for Den of Geek Laura Akers examines an episode of Castle to highlight the media's changing approach to geeky pastimes. "Ironically, it is the actors, those who have traditionally profited from but sometimes cruelly patronized geek fans, who are portrayed [in the episode] as dysfunctional (and morally ugly)." She concludes that the Castle writers recognize that "geeks are no longer a marginal group who can be used and then mocked or dismissed. While Fillion is a bonafide geek, he and those like him are simply smart. They recognize that we are now legion—there are enough of us to build a substantial career on."

    What points of dispute have you come across in fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Audiovisual histories

    Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 4 August 2013 - 6:34pm
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    Picture of a cassette tape with post title caption

    • A few posts have recently discussed fannish audiovisual works. One was at Learned Fangirl which examined musical remix culture. "One advantage in analyzing the creativity surrounding Daft Punk’s Get Lucky is that the original visuals doesn’t matter to the re-imaginings at all. This allows the public to focus on the brilliance that is possible with just the reuse and re-purposing of the music." Addressing a frequent criticism, writer Raizel insisted "All of these works **are** transformative – all of them have the original and change it into something new and different. Instead of stripping away the economic value of the song, they have increased it. Fans found this song meaningful and 'made it their own', helping others find the fun as well."
    • At The Daily Dot, Gavia Baker-Whitelaw explored the evolution of fandom mixtape culture. "Fanmixes can be created as the soundtrack to a fanfic, but they’re just as likely to be like a normal mixtape: capturing a particular moment or mood. It’s just [rather] than being 'breakup songs of 2007,' the mood in question is more likely to be 'music on the theme of defeating Voldemort.'" The importance of new online platforms was cited as a breakthrough. "With the advent of playlist sites like 8tracks and Spotify, fanmixing has become a lot more accessible. Up until recently, mixes were mostly uploaded onto file-sharing websites and then posted to LiveJournal communities, meaning listeners had to commit to downloading the whole thing. Plus, there was the ever-present threat of copyright infringement (the boogeyman of fandom), so a lot of those communities were members only."
    • Polygon.com featured "an eight-minute CGI piece called The Lord Inquisitor: Prologue" which "represents a reaction, of sorts, to an official 2010 film called Warhammer Ultramarines, which failed to meet the hopes of many in the 40K community." While the creators hope to eventually make a 40 minute film that's financed by outside producers, they feel they are taking a fannish angle to the project. "'They take your favorite thing and they make it crappy. You get disappointed. You want something better, You realize that in order to do that you need to engage and spend your own time to make that happen. That is the fundamental thing our group is trying to prove...Hollywood has this money-driven agenda to produce things that sell. But fans can create things that are more in-depth, more challenging, more fun.'"

    What audiovisual histories do you know about? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom surprises

    Claudia Rebaza on Monday, 29 July 2013 - 10:19pm
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    • Bronies have frequently been written about as the poster children for unexpected fandom demographics, but they aren't alone. Writing about "The Male Fandom of the Disney Princesses", Steven M. Johnson said "Maybe it was because I grew up in a family with two older sisters and no brothers — but in my house, videos of The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, and Sleeping Beauty played every single day — and I enjoyed them just as much as my sisters. Dads don’t have any need to worry or feel funny if their sons are Princess fans. Just like the great Disney heroes, the Disney heroines can teach your kids, male and female, valuable lessons of strength, independence, and pursuing their dreams."
    • While academic discussions of fandom have explored its cultural implications, it's also revealed activity obscured by assumptions about who takes part in what. Anthropologist Meghan Ferriter has been studying the fandom of the US Women’s soccer team on Tumblr. "What the USWNT fandom actually discusses and creates are representations of the USWNT, players, other fans, opponents, and other popular culture narratives...Mediated sport discourse, as well as USWNT fandom Tumblr disourses, provide accounts; neither reality nor clean interpretation of events. Rather, as with discourses of mediated sport, Tumblr discourses present a version of events that speaks to broader social relationships and understandings of sexuality, national identities, gender, and imply relationships of power."
    • WhatCulture.com suggests that pandering to preconceived fannish notions will be the downfall of the Hollywood machine. "There is a virus sweeping the boardrooms of film studios throughout Hollywood. It is a bitter, poisonous little blighter that sucks the joy and originality out of anything it touches. It is a self-serving, self-aware, tyrannical strain of social profiling. And it is quickly dominating the way in which films are conceived and made. It is eating away at filmmakers, and rapidly controlling the output of every major studio in modern cinema. It is known only as the ‘Fanboy’ plague."

    What assumptions have you seen perpetuated about fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom in life and death

    Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 27 July 2013 - 11:29pm
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    • The death of Glee actor Cory Monteith put attention on the show's fanbase. A former social media worker for the show discussed how the fans had won her over. "I spent several hours a day in the company of the gleeks, whose intensely positive outlook was genuinely disarming...The job was part marketing and part customer service, but I also found myself drawn into the role of unofficial counsellor. These were teenagers passionately involved in the lives of onscreen high-schoolers who reflected and played out their own feelings of isolation and confusion. They tweeted incredibly personal things to each other – and to me. Although I was just a disembodied online voice, I was still a sympathetic ear; an almost-real imaginary friend."
    • Meanwhile Junkee.com looked at the fanworks that were being produced. "Glee’s fan fiction community was quick to react. Numerous stories appeared on FanFiction.Net overnight, some of them are set within the world of the show, as Finn’s friends and relatives deal with the news of his death, and some are about the actors themselves. Some are maudlin, some are strangely poignant, but together, they offer a fascinating insight into the ways that people process their grief for a beloved character and a person they’ve likely never met."
    • In MLB fandom, it was the case of a fan's death and a player's decision to attend the funeral that made the news. "On the day of the memorial service for the love of her life, Meredith Benton wore her black Mets jersey stitched with orange and blue." She was not alone as "[i]n Jim's obituary in the Nashville Tennessean, attendees of the memorial were instructed to wear orange and blue." Mets player R.A. Dickey who lived near the memorial service heard about the death and went to meet the family. "To live a life without being passionate about something, be it a sports team or poetry or art, would be a really hollow life. So to see someone be passionate about something, I respond to that. It's a good thing, and I appreciate it. And there's no doubt he was passionate about baseball, in particular the New York Mets. So I felt a connection to him, even though I had never met him."

    What fandom attachments have you seen live on? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Post-Kindle Worlds Writing

    Claudia Rebaza on Thursday, 25 July 2013 - 7:29pm
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    • Amazon's move into fanfiction has launched more than one exploration of "what it all means." Time Magazine summed it up with "Amazon Steps Into the Cloistered World of Super-Fandom". "[F]or professional writers, getting in on it from the beginning makes economic sense, says author Barry Eisler, whose John Rain novels are part of the program. 'Some people just do not like the feeling of other people writing stories with the characters they created,' he says. ;Publishing for me is a business, not an ideology. When I sold the Bulgarian rights to my book, I was very excited to sell them—and this is just another subsidiary rights offer.'" OTW Board member Kristen Murphy "points out that this isn’t the first time a non-fan organization has stepped in to try to turn fan devotion into a business. 'I think a lot of fans are very suspicious of what looks like attempts by outsiders to come in and commodify the community and make money off of us,' she says. 'There’s always going to be, I think, some of that suspicion.'"
    • In Publishing Perspectives Anna von Veh discusses how Amazon's move is disappointing for everyone. "Kindle Worlds and the form of the ebook itself fulfills a gatekeeper role for the World licensors, rather than being also an online vehicle for writing, reading and building community for the fans, which is what one might have expected of a fanfiction-based publishing venture." Pointing out the importance of community, she adds "[O]nline writing sites, even the most basic, enable and enhance one of the most important aspects of a fandom: the sense of belonging, of community, created through the opportunities for immediate and direct interaction and feedback with readers and followers" and "also provides the means for writers to include all sorts of external pop and culture references, and hyperlinks, which can be managed by even an amateur techie."
    • The importance of the online community is cited by many a fanfic author turned pro, exactly the people Kindle Worlds is meant to attract. Writer Carolynn Gockel mentioned this advantage and more in her post "How Fanfiction Made Me a Better Author." "In the process I made fans, and more importantly, made fans who enjoyed my work but could be honest and critical. They helped me keep my characters true and my stories humming along...I would argue that my work which combines action, romance, fantasy and science fiction might have been hard to find a writers group for. By writing fanfiction in my chosen genres–sci-fi and fantasy–I was able to meet like minds." What's more, she was able to track the responses of readers to stories in progress. "I can see how many people are reading my stories, what stories they’re reading, what chapters in the stories perked their interests, and when I let them down. I can tell which stories are well read, but aren’t getting a lot of reviews...People who don’t review still buy stories."

    What do you expect to see in fanfiction post-Kindle Worlds? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom lessons

    Claudia Rebaza on Monday, 22 July 2013 - 4:38pm
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    • Movies.com noticed the fandom angle in its review of the documentary Spook Central. "In a similar vein to Room 237, Spook Central is a documentary that asks fans to explain their theories about the hidden meanings in Ivan Reitman's 1984 film about a team of nerds who use science to bust ghosts. What hidden meanings, you ask? We don't know. We thought it was a pretty straightforward genre mash-up, but apparently director Ivo Shandor found enough of them to turn it into a feature film. Or maybe he's using a movie as apparently transparent as Ghostbusters to gently mock overly analytical movies like Room 237?"
    • Suzanne Walker wrote in the Oxford University Press blog about her involvement in superhero fandom. "I have always been an eager student of American history, and superheroes offer an important reflection not only on our current society but also on our own cultural history...It’s quite telling, for example, that it took until the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s for Marvel to create its first African-American superhero, the Black Panther, and that one of Ms. Magazine’s first covers was an image of Wonder Woman in 1972, heralding the second-wave feminist movement. More recently, I re-watched the 2008 Iron Man film and was struck by how dated it already is even five years later. It’s extremely attuned to the politics of the late Bush years, and strives to offer commentary on the United States’ wars abroad even as it delivers high-flying adventures with Tony Stark."
    • Blogger Luz Delfondo wrote about Five lessons I learned from fandom and how fandom can expand people's awareness of story content. The lessons? 1. Characters of different races are not interchangeable, 2. Asexuality is a lot more complicated than just not wanting to have sex, 3. You can’t just say you’re going to give marginalized characters their due. You have to do it, 4. All kinks are normal, and 5. Together, women can form a powerful and just community of writers and editors. "When I write fic about female characters kicking ass, my beta readers (fandom lingo for editors) cheer me on. When I read a sex scene between two women, I can be almost certain a woman wrote it. I’ve had a reader tell me that she’s taken quotes from my fic and tacked it to her bedroom wall. I’ve had a reader tell me that a fic I wrote helped her think more deeply about her own gender identity and sexuality. It touches me deeply that I’ve had an impact on other women that way."

    What lessons have you learned from fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: From the remote to the fic

    Claudia Rebaza on Monday, 15 July 2013 - 5:39pm
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    • The popularity of Game of Thrones prompted a variety of fan-oriented discussion in the media about its finale. NPR's Talk of the Nation held a discussion on how people deal with unexpected or unhappy story endings. "[P]eople seemed to be not only shocked by what happened...but really angry, and that was what's so fascinating about it. Not just that they were disappointed that, you know, the characters who they had liked would no longer be on the show, they were really angry. And I think that shows just how locked in we are to the kinds of conventions and expectations that we have when we approach a story, even at a time when, you know, we have more stories available to us than at any time in human history. Nevertheless, we feel like it's supposed to go down a certain kind of path." (Transcript available)
    • Smithsonian.com discussed the topic with a more research-oriented angle. "The powerful emotional response by fans of Game of Thrones may seem weird to those who are not fans of the show. But we’re here, along with a little bit of help from University of Helsinki researcher Howard Sklar, to tell you that that powerful, visceral, emotional response you had...is totally okay...The key, Sklar argues, is that the way we get to know fictional characters—through little tidbits of information, through watching their actions, through the things we hear about them—isn’t so different from how we come to understand strangers. He says the processes of getting to know a fictional character is much like learning about a real person who lives out in the real world who we’ve only come to know through online interactions or non-fiction writing. From our perspective, sure, we know that one person is real and the other isn’t—but sometimes it doesn’t feel that way."
    • At policy.mic, Rajiv Narayan uses Arrested Development to discuss What Fandom And Economics Taught Me About So-So TV. "I think part of what’s missing from my TV-watching experience is a real-time fan community and critic response. What makes some series great has less to do with the show than the conversation surrounding the show. The poster-boy for this argument is Lost, a show that was incredible to watch in its heyday even as it made its viewers put up with spontaneous time-travel, unsolved mysteries, alternate timelines, ecologically-impossible wildlife, and so on...The emergence of straight-to-full-release shows on Netflix like House of Cards and Arrested Development pull the rug out from under a fan base. Even if the shows are great (like the former), the potential enjoyment of their experience is limited from the outset by being all out there. What’s the point of a rabid fan base when you have all the answers? Fan communities that once guess at reveals now police spoiler alerts."
    • Molly Templeton at Salon returns to Game of Thrones, ostensibly to pitch fanfic as a balm, post-finale, but also to recognize that fanfiction communities are about more than fic. "I searched Tumblr tags, skimmed LiveJournal communities, and searched fanfiction.net and AO3 for fanfic that disproved the common assumptions about it — that it’s bad, or all porn, or a waste of time for everyone involved. Here’s what I found. Stumbling into fanfic without a guide will make you feel like a tourist." Browsing archives leads to the discovery that "[f]anfic is an immersive, collaborative world, and to be just a reader of it is to miss a lot of what makes it tick: writers taking prompts, writing stories for friends, beta-reading each others’ work, inspiring and being inspired by the stories that might sprawl across fandoms. It’s unexpectedly lonely being just a reader when it’s so clear how much action is going on behind the scenes."

    What fandom discussions have you seen taking over the media? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fannish platforms

    Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 13 July 2013 - 10:38pm
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    • The Times of India explored fandom sites. "Special interest websites appear to be edging out Facebook as popular hangout places on the internet. Art, travel, baking, fan fiction - there is a platform for everybody with a passion." They look briefly at Fanfiction.net and deviantArt, which "began as an online community to showcase user created art work. The site is ancient, by internet standards - launched in 2000. As of 2011, it was the 13th largest social networking service in the world."
    • While "ancient" sites are doing well for fans, there are a number of new platforms that also want fannish engagement. One is Glipho, which "has deep integration with all of the leading social networks, which makes sharing your content one click simple". Site spokesperson Rachel Monte told the OTW that "We are very open to transformative works, recently added a fiction category to our site, and are eager to see more discourse of a fannish nature on there - the trouble seems to be in letting fandom know that we're here and ready to welcome it with open arms...We allow imports from blogs which are powered by Wordpress, Blogger, or Tumblr, without affecting the original blog at all and looking after the SEO. We also integrate optional connectivity with all the major social networks, including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest."
    • Asked about Glipho's Terms of Service, Monte responded that "All copyright remains with the original creator of the content on Glipho. Glipho is granted a non-exclusive transferable worldwide royalty-free license to the content posted on Glipho (see 8.3.1 in the TOS). We will never delete content completely from Glipho without the user specifically requesting it. If a gliph breaks Glipho’s Terms of Service, the Glipho team will notify the user and ask them to amend it. If there is a complaint about a particular gliph, the Glipho team will pass the complaint on to the user. The most that we would do is revert a gliph to draft status, or mark it as ‘removed’. In this case, although the gliph would no longer appear on the site, the user would still be able to access their content. If the content is amended to address the issue, it may be re-published to the site. And all users would be notified by email of any ToS changes."
    • Yet another company looking for fanfic writers is NARR8, which sent out a press release about its Storybuilder editing tool for interactive stories. "All user-generated content will be available free of charge, but once a user's episode hits 1,000 downloads, that user will be authorized to sell the content for NARRs, virtual currency that NARR8 released in February. This will let the user unlock additional content and features. In the near future, NARR8 will implement a revenue-sharing model that will let the authors of popular series earn money from virtual sales of their content."

    What fannish platforms do you use? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Marketing fanfiction

    Claudia Rebaza on Thursday, 11 July 2013 - 6:48pm
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    • Australia's Business Review Weekly put a local angle on Amazon's expanding properties for Kindle Worlds. "The e-book market has enormous growth potential but it is also fraught with pitfalls. Australia’s biggest book retail chain Dymocks tried its hand at e-book publishing but struggled to get the business model right and closed its D Publishing venture in March this year after 15 months. However, it is not just about size; one of the big stories in the e-book world is Australian-based Writers Coffee Shop, a small e-book fiction publisher that shot to fame with the success of erotic novel Fifty Shades of Grey."
    • Canada's The Province Book blog posted about Kindle Worlds as well with a different sort of "local" angle. "Amazon has made a fortune off of KDP, and it is well aware that many indie writers either got their start writing fan fiction or continue to write fan fiction even as their writing careers take off. Bestselling author Naomi Novik, for instance, whose Temeraire series has been optioned for film by Peter Jackson, is a supporter of fan fiction...The Organization for Transformative Works, a 'nonprofit organization established by fans to serve the interests of fans by providing access to and preserving the history of fanworks and fan culture in its myriad forms,' has a pretty good roundup of responses to this latest move by Amazon. While some fans certainly celebrate the announcement, others have concerns about what Amazon may want in terms of intellectual property — are they going to make films out of the fan fiction others publish?"
    • Digital Book Wire claimed Kindle Worlds Has First Imitator: Outlier Digital From Twilight Producers. "The problem with the recently released Kindle Worlds’ platform, is it traps writers within the confines of Amazon’s as yet unestablished fan-fiction community instead of the extensive network already at their fingertips,” said Mark Morgan, one of the company partners, in the statement. “Their idea is close, but it actually prevents fan-fiction writers from posting their stories anywhere else, halting their existing fan-base outreach on other free portal options. It’s like saying they can write whatever they want as long as they do it for Amazon."
    • Gamma Squad talked about the Jim Henson Company's pitch to fanfic writers to write a prequel story to The Dark Crystal. "To be fair, this is a bit more of a deal than Amazon’s attempt to get the next Fifty Shades of Grey for dirt; the winner, if there is one, will receive $10,000 as part of their contract. Of course, one doesn’t see the word 'advance' anywhere in the official rules, so you might be forking over your writing ability for little more than a pat on the head, but at least they don’t put 'valuable exposure' as a prize." Of course, given how media outlets are now ready to slap a fanfiction label on anything, the spotlight moment seems more and more likely.

    What fanfic marketing promotions have you come across? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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