值得注意的新闻

  • OTW Fannews: Multiple takes of the same thing

    Claudia Rebaza on Friday, 8 November 2013 - 10:27pm
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    Banner by Bremo with the post title and images of three different actors portraying Sherlock Holmes

    • The romance publishing industry was among the first to start bringing in self-published writers and first time novelists, which they are now doing through Wattpad. The site has been active internationally, both promoting its site and now partnering with publishers to create a print imprint. Allen Lau, CEO of Wattpad, said “A lot of writers are afraid of sharing their work...And if you hide your work, you miss the opportunity to let other people appreciate your writing, and also missing some big opportunities in the process—your story might even become a movie, for example.”
    • Writers wary of sharing their work have a good reason for it though -- theft. The case of Shey Stahl is a good example of many writers feeding one person's career. "Goodreads reviewer Ari Bookzilla posted a word-by-word comparison between excerpts of Stahl's latest novel, For the Summer, and a popular Twilight fanfic known as Dusty...Other Goodreaders claimed that the novel's summary had been lifted from another Twilight fic: another popular offering called Pickup Truck...Even the title, "For the Summer," is the title of another well-known Twilight fic...The question of why Stahl may have stolen so much from Twilight fanfic authors is simple: She was one. Stahl wrote fanfic under the pen name Jaydmommy, and she was plagued by plagiarism allegations then, too."
    • Such cases of plagiarism make cases such as the ongoing lawsuit involving Sherlock Holmes seem as antiquated as the copyright at the center of the battle. As Tech Dirt pointed out, it would seem that the Conan Doyle Estate Is Horrified That The Public Domain Might Create 'Multiple Personalities' Of Sherlock Holmes. The estate's argument "presents a way to make copyright on characters perpetual. You just need to have someone continue to release new works that have some minor change to the character, and they get to pretend you have a new starting point for the public domain ticker" meaning that "so long as you never 'complete' the character creation, they can never go into the public domain."
    • Shadowlocked argued that there not only can be should be multiple takes on a franchise. "Neill Blomkamp's humility in acknowledging the subjective side of fandom and that his take on the franchise wouldn't have been for everyone is admirable, but perhaps fans as well as filmmakers could learn from this approach. As a fan, it's arguably better to look at a film in a franchise made by a particular director as that director's take on the franchise, rather than, 'How dare they ruin my beloved franchise?' Because directors can be fans too, and not all fans appreciate the source material in exactly the same way."

    What stories about fanfiction publishing and legal rights have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandoms being seen

    Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 5 November 2013 - 10:03pm
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    Banner by Erin of the post title with a gun, ax, wand and notebooks plus the OTW logo

    • In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, producer Jeff Eastin discussed fanfiction ships and their influence on his work. "White Collar still wins in terms of fan fiction, but I've seen quite a bit of fan fiction directed at Graceland. The Mike-Charlie 'ship seems to be very popular and after that it shifted pretty quickly to Mike and Paige, which was nice to see...I had heard of fan fiction but I never saw the extent that people went to. (Laughs.) Somebody on Twitter sent me a link to some of the better White Collar fan fiction, and once in a while, I'll check it out and see what people are saying. It's really fascinating to me and it's an interesting subculture that arises on a lot of these shows. In my opinion, if you have people who are [taking part], you've made it."
    • Britt Julious of WBEZ wrote about engaging in Scandal fandom through Twitter. "According to a 2009 study from the Pew Research Center’s Pew Internet and American Life Project, Twitter users are more likely to be African-American women. As well, according to a report from the New York Times of Nielsen ratings, 'Scandal is the highest rated scripted drama among African-Americans, with 10.1 percent of black households, or an average of 1.8 million viewers, tuning in during the first half of the season.'" Thus while the fandom can be seen among different generations in a household "My timeline explodes with chatter about the show, its characters, the clothing, and the music as it airs."
    • Julious also mentions Sleepy Hollow, whose fandom is growing quickly. "For a show that has only been on the air for four weeks—the fifth episode airs tonight—Sleepy Hollow's fan base is loud. That's, at least, what you would assume from the decibel level during the show's New York Comic Con panel." Actor Orlando Jones has been particularly engaged with the fandom, saying during the panel "'Fan art rocks! Who ships Ichabbie?' to rich crowd approval...The importance of shipping to the fan base was confirmed further when the next question came from someone who began, 'So if you’ve been paying attention at all to the Tumblr phenomenon of Sleepy Hollow, Icabbie is a huge deal.'"
    • Meanwhile the Harry Potter fandom continues to make news with its lobbying of Warner Brothers. Bustle wrote about the chocolate campaign. "There's always been an oft-spoken of symbiotic relationship between fans and the studios responsible for creating the work those fans love. There's also been an underlying tension. They create the work (or at least bring it to us), yes; but they're also the ones responsible for messing them up. And there are many scenarios that can carry the weight of this tension: The blundering of a book's canon, the mistreatment of a character, the failure of a studio to fully grasp the thematic elements that first made the source material so special, the list goes on and on. Each error can isolate the fan communities huddled around these works, particularly when that bungling of philosophy extends past the films themselves and into the marketing products sold and used in the real world."

    What examples have you seen of fandoms making themselves heard? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Crossing boundaries

    Claudia Rebaza on Monday, 4 November 2013 - 12:30am
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    Banner by Diane of the post title in a hazy mist

    • The Daily Dot cited a drawback of the increased communication between fans and creators -- the likelihood of direct conflict. The writer of the latest Star Trek film took fans to task for their criticism of the finished work, reducing them to spoiled children in his responses. "Orci’s repeated assertions that he 'listens' to fans seem meaningless when the end result is a movie that inspired widespread disappointment among its intended audience. Particularly when 'listening' also seems to be accompanied by cursing, insults, and taunts."
    • The conflicts are not only the result of fans commenting to creators online, but also in how the work of amateurs, fans gone pro, and professional creators overlaps and clashes. Blogger Literary Lottie pointed out the absurd escalation by some science-fiction authors to the suggestion that they should not engage in fan discussions unless explicitly invited. "I don’t think there’s anything wrong with authors engaging fans and reviewers on blogs, Twitter, and the like, so long as they recognize that while they have the power to clarify, they don’t have the power to correct, they don’t have the privilege of directing how fans should interpret their work, and, AND, that they should not become angry or argumentative upon being told they do not have that privilege."
    • Many media outlets connected fans' objections to the casting of the Fifty Shades of Grey film to the withdrawal of lead Charlie Hunnam from the movie. "If Charlie Hunnam really has backed out of Fifty Shades of Grey because the fans didn't want him, could it mark a tipping point in the relationship between studio and audience?" asked Karl Quinn at the Sydney Morning Herald. Noting the risk-averse behavior of many film studios, Quinn says "Hollywood has been dabbling at the edges of fan involvement for years but as the response to the casting for Fifty Shades and Batman vs Superman shows all too clearly, it is not a strategy without its risks."
    • There's a difference however between casual criticism and activism. Heather Ash wrote at The Learned Fangirl about her successful correspondence with LEGO. "In my previous post, I wrote a letter to Lego taking them to task for requiring that my son identify himself as a girl in their database in order to receive the Lego Friends insert, which was sent only to girls." Ash used her actions as a teaching moment for her children and concluded, "If Lego follows through, my son will get his Friends insert. Someone else’s son won’t even have to ask...And no one’s daughter will be automatically enrolled based on outdated gender stereotyping. And children with a gender identity that isn’t girl or boy, won’t need to identify as something they aren’t just to get the toys they crave."

    What examples have you seen of fan and creator interaction? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Ripped from fandom

    Claudia Rebaza on Thursday, 31 October 2013 - 5:11pm
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    Banner by Bremo of the post title with a tear through the word 'Ripped'

    • Communities of fanfic writers took their writing group practices online decades ago. On the Media reported on a commercial copy of these spaces, dubbing it "virtual workshopping. A website from Penguin Publishing, Book Country, enables thousands of writers to exchange manuscripts and notes and self-publish their work. A few have even gotten traditional publishing deals through the site." Other than the book deals, the mechanisms sound familiar. "[I]f a writer has written something that is just awful, not very many people will comment on it or they will comment briefly and respectfully but not say very much; there's a sort of graceful fade away. And the second thing that can happen is a manuscript that might seem terrible to one reader seems fantastic to another, because they are the right audience for it. You can find sub-categories and niche audiences that you wouldn't otherwise access."
    • While not commercial, Caroline Siede wrote in A.V. Club about a fandom practice that has been automated, making gifs. "Gifs have long been the bread and butter of Tumblr—the perfect way to capture every moment of Dean/Castiel sexual tension, every David Tennant eyebrow raise, and, apparently, every moment of Omar Little badassery...Either to mock these fans or to help them celebrate their beloved Wire by capturing even more moments from the show, programmer Darius Kazemi has created a robot that posts a random gif and an accompanying line of dialogue from The Wire every hour."
    • At SB Nation an "experiment" in writing fanfiction to accompany a photo turned into dueling fics when "my effort at fulfilling this assignment struck my esteemed girlfriend as so gross that she would not let it stand but composed her own rival fan fiction Friday to bring the touch of urbanity to the proceedings."
    • Hero Complex interviewed Eric Moro, Wikia’s director of entertainment programming and asked "Why a collaborative effort between professionals and an online fan community?" to which he replied "[O]ur various anime and manga communities draw incredibly large audiences from all over the world. So hosting a project in this space allowed us to play at a global level. Second...it’s more about the creator that’s involved than it is about the character(s). Third, comic book, movie and TV characters are all tied up in complicated rights issues/licenses. And while we’re just starting to see networks work in this space (“The Vampire Diaries” fan fiction through Amazon’s Kindle Worlds, for example), it’s still not an idea the industry has fully embraced."

    What "ripped from fandom" stories have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Commercializing fan gatherings

    Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 29 October 2013 - 6:46pm
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    Banner by Robyn of money symbols behind the post's title

    • Buzzfeed looked at the umbrella of Disney fandom at its company fancon. "D23 serves as a giant hype machine for the company’s upcoming productions and consumer products, a big shopping center for the stuff they already have out, and a central meeting spot for fans and fan-vendors from around the world. It has two main constituencies: the hardcore Disney fans — D23 is also the name of the company’s official fan club, with 23 signifying the year Walt Disney moved to Hollywood and founded the studio — and members of the press who brave the traffic to Anaheim to write about the the studio’s movie presentations. The event is like Comic-Con, but with fewer snarky fanboys and more family-centric fare."
    • A post at the Vancouver Sun looks at the evolution of gaming cons. "Over time there has been a definitive split between the two types of conventions, with consumer based ones feeding more into the actual fandom of games. PAX itself is built on the shoulders of this fandom, sponsored and created by Penny Arcade, an online comic that has long dealt with video game and various other nerd and geek culture. While most developers will hardly ever achieve a sort of fame (or notoriety) similar to film or television stars, these conventions give the public, and players a chance to directly interact with those who on the average day are hard to reach. Feedback from these conventions, where betas and alphas of games are available to play, not only help build hype and anticipation for upcoming games, but also allows the developers to gather much needed and necessary feedback from those who will eventually be buying their product."
    • Meanwhile Tumblr plays host to a virtual book club that is part user reaction and part viral marketing. “I still think it can be tricky to create the feel of a book club with people in different time zones who never get to meet. I’m humbly suggesting that Tumblr might be the best way to do it. You can use text as short or longform as you want, art, gifs, videos, songs; you can include hundreds or thousands of contributors without getting confusing; and you can create original posts or share interesting things you find elsewhere on the Web.”
    • These commercial efforts stand in contrast to a recent post on NextGov about an unexpected encounter with fandom, and its relevance to other social activists. "One key insight, though, came from...panelist Lauren Bird of the Harry Potter Alliance...[about]...how super-fandom can go hand in hand with intense criticism...Bird begins her defense acknowledging it may seem silly to protest labor practices in the chocolate industry by focusing on an entertainment company rather than, say, Nestle or Hershey’s. But it makes sense for the HPA...partly because a shift by Warner Brothers could put pressure on larger players in the chocolate industry." Reporter Joseph Marcks concluded "The idea that [a government] agency’s greatest fans could also be among its biggest online gadflies is rare in government. It’s tough to blame agencies for this. Many of them face so much online vitriol it’s tough to sift out any constructive criticism. But agencies are also sometimes so cynical about their own capacity for popularity that they might not recognize a fan movement even if it existed."

    What merging of corporate interests and fan gatherings have you seen? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Criticizing Fandom

    Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 26 October 2013 - 5:52pm
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    Banner by caitie of 3 figures at a table holding up cards with scores on them.

    • Entertainment Weekly kicked off a new pop-culture-related column with a look at TV show finales and cited former OTW board member Francesca Coppa. "Mentally, it is difficult to imagine someone from the 50s declaring themselves a 'fan' of a TV show the way someone self-identifies as a 'Fan' of Walking Dead or Vampire Diaries or Firefly or, hell, NCIS: LA. This is partly because we inaccurately agree that TV wasn’t as good in the ’50s and partly because we assume people in the ’50s had better things to do...But modern fandom has roots in that time period. Francesca Coppa’s fascinating essay 'A Brief History of Media Fandom' (available in the Fan Fiction and Fan Communities in the Age of the Internet) traces our contemporary idea of media fandom — fan clubs, fanfiction, fan conventions — to a pair of TV shows from the 1960s: Star Trek and The Man from U.N.C.L.E."
    • As a possible example of the fan complaints cited in the EW piece, Hypable jumped on the criticism by Once Upon a Time fandom about poor marketing efforts by its network. "ABC has had to pull back the Once Upon a Time season 3 cast photos due to unexpected fandom backlash. Once Upon a Time fans love their show and its characters, and have reportedly responded so negatively to the season 3 cast photoset that ABC has pulled the photographs from their press site."
    • The EW piece was not flattering to fandom, but writing in Flavor Wire Jason Diamond dismisses Jillian Cantor’s Margot as fanfiction, as if that were equivalent with poor taste. "Shalom Auslander, in 2012′s Hope: A Tragedy, wrote a book that I consider in even poorer taste, placing a still-alive Anne Frank in the modern-day attic of somebody’s house, trying to squeeze humor from this Philip Rothian plot device. Like Cantor, and unlike Mangum’s album or Quentin Tarantino’s fictional Jewish revenge film Inglourious Basterds, his book upset me because it trivialized, rather than made moving art in tribute to, the real lives of Holocaust victims."
    • Perhaps this negativity explains why, in this ABC piece Cafe Tacvba Fans Downplay Their Fandom, though the reporter concludes otherwise. "Eager to collect fandom statements on what makes a Cafeta fan a real, super, ultimate fan, I flew into New York City from Miami to attend its Monday night concert. Being a fan for the past 15 years and this probably being my 25th time going to a Cafe Tacvba show, I thought I was a super fan. But after talking to folks, I wonder if I'm committed enough to call myself one. There, I was not able to find anyone who would even self-identify as a "super fan"...Turns out Cafe Tacvba fans are so devoted to them, they believe they are not worthy of their fandom. They downplay their devotion, because proclaiming they are Cafe Tacvba super fans would entail great responsibility."

    What fandom criticisms have you seen? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Examining fanfiction

    Claudia Rebaza on Thursday, 24 October 2013 - 7:46pm
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    Banner by Erin with a woman looking through a magnifying glass at the center with fan-related words behind her

    • One of the clear signs that fanfiction has arrived is the frequency with which new books and articles come out about it. To some, the fact that there is a considerable amount of academic study on the topic comes as a surprise. "By reading fanfiction, one’s interpretation of the original work (i.e. the canon) is expanded to incorporate new ideas, depending on whether you accept or reject the fanfic author’s vision. This is where we get widely accepted theories of fanon from. What this then leads to is a 'flattening', so to speak, of the original source. As fanfic culture flourishes, the consumer’s interpretation of an anime becomes much more deeply personal. This effectively breaks down the barriers that generally arise when we go from interpreting a text to actively taking it in as a creative influence."
    • While quite a few documentaries about fandom have been created, fewer focus on fanworks. Thus Slash is of particular interest. "Fan fiction writers, and especially so the writers of slash fiction, need to be confronted on their own terms. There's a low-fi quality at work here. Something very cobbled together, and in a strange way, dangerous. Dangerous in that sexy way that something can be when you don't quite know where it's coming from or what its intentions are...You will never feel the titillation of the unknown, that tiny tingle of ecstatic fear, when you see a glossy, studio-produced 50 Shades of Gray movie. It will be clean and polished and filled with pretty people who blush appropriately anytime the conversation goes south of the anatomical equator."
    • Morgan Davies' post on The Toast is briefer but also attempts to examine the history of slash. "As many other people have pointed out before, slash is much more about women and female sexuality than it is about men or male sexuality, for all that the characters on the page (or, well, screen) are male, and in possession of biologically male genitalia. As my friend Caitlin wrote in a Tumblr post on the subject, 'any understanding that slash is only meant to or required to depict real world relationships is a false understanding of what slash is.'"
    • The relevance of fanfiction to other parts of people's lives is also becoming a point of discussion. Ethan McCarthy does so in Patheos, suggesting that non-fans should consider where meaning comes from. "Readers are taking a more active role in determining a work’s meaning through interpretation. This broader cultural context can help us understand why fan fiction has taken off the way that it has. In fan fiction, meaning has less and less to do with the 'original' story, and more and more to do with the subjectivity of the fan’s imagination. The original story is left at the mercy of the fan’s own assumptions, interests, and yes, sometimes perversions. While the reader’s role in interpretation is important and shouldn’t be undervalued, the Christian doctrine of creation teaches us that meaning does finally inhere in the creator’s intentions."

    What sort of consideration do you see fanfiction getting? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Not so surprising sports fandoms

    Claudia Rebaza on Wednesday, 23 October 2013 - 6:10pm
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    Banner by Lisa of a green field with huddled soccer players & a team scarf being raised in the stands

    • Although they're among the most visible fandoms in many cultures, sports fandoms are also often gendered in the media. Forbes took note of better-late-than-never marketing to women, while Yahoo's Breakout blog listed five "surprising" stats about fantasy sports leading with the fact that players are both younger and more female than generally portrayed.
    • At Sports on Earth writer Colin McGowan wrote about learning to be a soccer fan. "In Alex Pappademas' 'I Suck at Football' column that ran last season at Grantland, he wrote about how his daughter understood the sport as 'the show where the men try to get the ball and then they fall down,' which is about as apt a description of football as you're going to find...It's not much more complicated than that, though it's as rich as any other sport. Being a fan isn't so much about understanding how the game works as much as it's telling yourself stories about the machinery. We assign meaning to teams and players, favor some styles over others, delight in or are crushed by swings of luck. The men kick the ball toward the goal and then fall down, and we have a lot to say about that."
    • Writing about baseball, Richard Peterson speculates how being a fan of specific teams shapes a fan's personality. "I could tell what team they rooted for by observing their demeanor. The Cubs fans in the audience were easy to pick out because they were the ones who looked like they needed a hug. It was also easy to find the Cardinals fans because they were the ones sitting next to Cubs fans. They weren’t about to hug the fans of Chicago’s lovable losers, but they did want to make sure that Cubs fans knew what the fans of a winning team looked like."
    • The Philadelphia CityPaper decided to investigate fanfiction about its hometown Flyers. "There are hundreds of stories and millions of words dedicated to imagined romances and trysts with the Flyers available for your perusal on Mibba, a creative-writing website boasting well over 10,000 stories." Yet even within this slice of fandom, writer Dan McQuade seemed to find it surprising that women were involved: "Most authors of Flyers fanfic identify themselves as young women, and this may be the one place on the Internet where this is actually true." He also might want to wander beyond Mibba before claiming that "this phenomenon doesn’t happen for baseball, basketball or football."

    What sports fandom stories do you have to tell? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Legal challenges

    Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 19 October 2013 - 6:01pm
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    Banner by Diane of scales set over an antique desk and bookcase in candlelight

    • Public Knowledge announced its inaugural artist-in-residence, Elisa Kreisinger. She is currently soliciting contributors to her project Fair User(s) which asks "If you know of someone who has experienced any removal or disabling of content due to copyright please direct them to this survey."
    • Copyright attorney Timothy B. McCormack wrote about a recent lawsuit against the show Heroes of Cos-Play. "Cos-play costumes are derivative works because they are recasting the work their costume is based on into a new medium while still representing the original work of authorship. In some cases they might also be 'exact copies' 'strikingly similar' copies or 'substantially similar' copies. This means anyone who makes a costume based on an original work is required to obtain a copyright license from the owner if they do not want to commit copyright infringement. As a practical matter, however, it is unlikely cos-players will be sued unless they are trying to use their infringing costume to make a profit. The recent lawsuits involving NBC and the show 'Heroes of "Cos-Play,"' however, might beg to differ."
    • While most people think of rights holders as those who control creative works, one set of cosplayers ran into legal problems with a commercial carpet company. "Apparently the carpet costumes were so popular that one of the original cosplayers offered a version of the Marriott carpet pattern for the presumably vast number of people who also wanted to dress up in carpet-themed camo gear. Seeing this, carpet designers Couristan Inc. sent cosplay suppliers Volpin Props a Cease & Desist letter."
    • The proposed efforts in the U.K. to restrict online access to porn received worldwide attention, but less of it was paid to protests raised by users. At least one of them expressed fandom concerns about the legislation. "Another activist, Jess Palmer, was cheered by members after saying a pornography filter would have prevented her from discovering fan fiction with some adult themes and finding out about asexuality. Julian Huppert, MP for Cambridge, successfully asked for the motion to be 'referred back' to the party's policy committee for a rethink. He said there are some problems with children accessing internet pornography but this is not the solution."
    • Author Misha Burnett talked about aspects of fanfiction and their legal implications. "Genres are largely influenced by a particular work. One could make the case that Mickey Spillane’s Mike Hammer was Phillip Marlowe fan fiction. As Charles points out, J R R Tolkien’s Lord Of The Rings series has inspired the entire genre of Epic Fantasy." He also cites the many fiction and non-fiction works he has drawn on for his stories. "I don’t think that any author can be entirely free of the influence of other authors–what we read becomes a part of the experience that we draw upon to create our own work. The extent to which we are influenced by any one particular work is a matter of personal taste, however."

    What legal discussions have you seen pertaining to fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Doing Fandom

    Claudia Rebaza on Wednesday, 16 October 2013 - 5:57pm
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    Banner by Bremo of wheel and spoke diagram with Fandom at the center and fanworks and sites in the spoke bubbles

    • Writing for the Gadsden Times, David Murdock shared a discovery most fans make at some point - that there are many ways of being a fan. "Just like there are many different kinds of speculative fictions, there are many different types of fanboys and fangirls. My fanboy experience consists solely of reading books and watching movies. However, one important part of modern fanboy- and fangirl-ism is entirely out of my experience. I don’t do costumes. I have never dressed in a science fiction or fantasy-based costume for any reason whatsoever, not even Halloween. Just like I had a moment when I realized I liked hard science fiction, I had a moment when I realized that my fanboy experience does not include costumes."
    • Part of the reason for this difficulty is that fannish activities are always changing. The London Evening Standard noticed that Sherlock fans were "reviewing" the new season before it aired. "But there’s a new fanfic genre now, one that has emerged by accident...On Amazon, shoppers can already pre-order the complete third season on DVD...The site is also allowing customer reviews, so fans have piled in to give their fictitious accounts. So, er, fake spoiler alert!"
    • Australia's News.com was instead alarmed by frequent character death in pop music RPF. "'It's a good outlet for their angst,' says Kimberley O'Brien, adolescent psychologist at Sydney's Quirky Kid Clinic. 'At an age when emotions and hormones are fluctuating so much, it's nice they can cry openly. It's much better than being isolated and not expressing yourself.'...Fantasising about teen crushes meeting an early death is nothing new. In the 1960s, teen tragedy songs such as The Shangri-Las' Leader of the Pack and Mark Dinning's Teen Angel featured sweethearts perishing in motorcycle crashes or train wrecks. More recently, emo culture touched upon premature death, with My Chemical Romance theming a whole album around cancer (2006's The Black Parade)."
    • Then there are the unexpected places where fanworks appears -- such as craigslist. Various media outlets were in a tizzy over a Girls fanfic, with some strangely citing it as "the first entry into the canon". Either the media might want to use their search engine just a few minutes longer, or fanfiction writers might want to start posting their work in the classifieds to get more reviews.

    What ways of "doing fandom" do you know about? Share it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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