Fanfilms

  • OTW Fannews: Cross-border fandoms

    By Claudia Rebaza on Wednesday, 26 February 2014 - 8:25pm
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    Banner by Robyn of two stick figures saying 'Fan' and 'Fiction' to one another while standing on a split color square

    • The Manila Standard Today featured some articles on fanfiction, dubbing them "The other side of the fandom." The features explain types of fanfic and their locations online, concluding "Writers are not paid when they write fanfics. They all do it for the fandom, for their readers, and for themselves. Thus for consolation, reading the comments of their reader, knowing someone appreciates their work and waits patiently for the new chapter are enough for them to keep on writing."
    • A spate of stories on Sherlock fanfiction writing in China show a certain surprise about slash but there is also a focus on the significance of it within Chinese culture. "The other part of that equation is that the cultural landscape has shifted, attitudes about gay men, gender roles, and sex have shifted and women have seen this...In a country where gay men are in marriages they don't want to be in, where people are told to act straight, and where gay men and lesbians are even entering fake marriages to get people off their backs and live their lives, the Fu Nv represent an improvement in the country's attitudes toward the LGBT community, even if it is by way of raunchy Curly Fu-Peanut fan fiction."
    • In France some have decided to crowdfund a Sherlock fanfic adaptation of a young Sherlock and John meeting. Asked about the motivation for the project, director Naomi Javor replied "To quote the author. “You don’t need to be gay to like someone the same sex as you. [You must be] In love.” This is the message that spoke to me and inspired me...[I] want the viewers to feel like it gives [sexual] minorities an opportunity to be represented as well. It differs from mainstream media because I don’t need to worry that my network will shut me down."
    • The Fandom Post looked back at 2013 to pick out The (Lighter Side of the) Year in Anime. "Before the first month of the new year is over, we’d like to make some additions to The Year in Anime Awards, which we presented a short while ago. It’s not all just about serious awards for worthy shows. No, the review staff of The Fandom Post also knows when it’s time to kick back and take a less reverent look at the year just passed. Here, our staff members present some individual or specialized 'awards' for outstanding…something or other."

    What fanworks have you seen crossing boundaries? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanworks around the world

    By Claudia Rebaza on Thursday, 16 January 2014 - 8:31pm
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    Banner by Lisa of an aerial view of a network of city lights

    • Awesome Robo! explored Pacific Rim fanart. "I'd always been pretty curious about how Japan, especially their creative community would react to Pacific Rim, a movie that was a whole-hearted ode to various pop culture genres like Kaiju films and various 'Tokusatsu' (Special effects) genres that their cinema scene popularized...What we found was a plethora of amazing tribute pieces executed in a variety of styles and interpretations of both the Kaiju and Jaegers alike, showing that the movie had definitely found it's place with artists abroad."
    • The Mary Sue posted images of Batman graffiti discovered in an abandoned building. "Graffiti artist Pete One has been known to dabble with the Dark Knight in the past, this time he used an abandoned building in Ronse, Belgium for his canvas and took inspiration from the animated Batman TV show, comic artist Jock, and more!"
    • The Daily Dot wrote about an Attack on Titan cosplay film. "[W]e’re pretty sure 夜透 has taken the 'cosplay film' to a whole new level. The film features the J-rock song 'Neverever Land' by Nano, and a cover of the 3rd ending theme to Attack on Titan, 'The Reluctant Heroes,' as covered by a YouTube artist named Mica Caldito whose performances of two songs from the series recently went viral. The video was uploaded a few weeks ago but only recently crossed over into English-language SnK fandom."
    • A theater company in Asheville, South Carolina decided to put on an evening of Shakespeare fanfic. "[T]he Bard's work remains in high demand, with modern and star-studded adaptations of plays like Romeo and Juliet and Much Ado About Nothing filling movie theaters every few years. But it's not these reinventions that have captured the imagination of The Montford Park Players. Instead, the theater company's 'Evening of Shakespeare Fan Fiction,'...features G.B. Shaw's Dark Lady of the Sonnets and Vincent Dowling's The Upstart Crow."

    Write about the fanworks of your country on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Writing and performing

    By Claudia Rebaza on Monday, 18 November 2013 - 9:21pm
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    Banner by caitie of Inception characters on a stage

    • Allena Tapia wrote at The Huffington Post about 4 F-Words That Support Your Child As a Writer. The tips included encouraging fanfic, use of graphics and multiple platforms, "and total freedom over what he reads and writes."
    • MTV.com wrote about The Janoskians' One Direction mockumentary. In a familiar fan move, further installments are being held hostage until they get sufficient feedback. "The video has already clocked up over 200,000 views on YouTube in just a couple of days, but episode two will only be released once number one hits the big 500K. On their ‘#NotABoyBand World Tour’ earlier this year, The Janoskians performed a One Direction skit as part of their act, but insisted at the time that there is no 'hate' between them and the most famous boy band in the world. Beau told MTV UK back in May: 'To be honest, me and Luke actually love One Direction, we’re huge 1D fans.'"
    • The Daily Dot wrote about the Inception musical staged in New York City. "The event has garnered considerable buzz from the Inception community as well; fans are planning to make the trek to the show from as far away as Canada. It might seem like a surprising act of devotion, but to fans who’ve had no new canon for years, getting the chance to see any new spin on their beloved movie is a not-to-be-missed chance. Fans are also drawn to the musical for shipper reasons: the libretto blatantly indulges the reading of the popular subtext between Arthur and Eames."
    • The L.A. Weekly wrote about slash and the fan con Escapade. "Slash has expanded beyond small, old-school communities like Escapade to younger, Internet fans, who are expressing themselves not only through stories but also via images and GIFs on Tumblr. Over Twitter, some share their obsession with the creators of the shows themselves, a breach that older slash fans used to view as unseemly. Still, among the general public, slash remains little known and little understood."

    What fannish works and fannish history have you experienced? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Playfulness and IP

    By Claudia Rebaza on Thursday, 14 November 2013 - 5:28pm
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    Banner by Erin of Lawrence Lessig holding a light saber by the logo for the EFF, facing off against the logo of Liberation holding up cash and a DMCA notice.

    • The University of Buffalo hosted a lecture by intellectual property scholar Madhavi Sunder titled Learning by Doing. Sunder says. “'Copyright owners have tolerated much fan activity on the theory that lawsuits can turn fans’ love to hate. But the emergence of an ‘experience economy’ may lead some owners of cultural property to reconsider their laissez-faire attitude toward play'...But, Sunder says, that impulse raises caution flags about 'the commoditization of fundamental human experiences and play.'...And because IP law is 'fundamentally about promoting knowledge and learning,' Sunder says, lawyers need to be careful to protect that goal, even when they are asked to help corporations turn such play into a commodity to be bought and sold.'"
    • One place rife with automated takedowns, which are particularly likely to be issued indiscriminately, is YouTube. Fortunately, as NPR put in its story title Record Label Picks Copyright Fight — With The Wrong Guy, IP scholar Lawrence Lessig had a video of a lecture taken down due to a small music clip within it. "At first, YouTube took it down. But being a copyright attorney, Lessig knew his rights. He was entitled to use these clips in a lecture under a legal doctrine known as fair use...Liberation Music eventually backed down. But Lessig decided to invoke another part of the copyright law, 'which basically polices bad-faith lawsuits,' he says — threats made fraudulently or without proper basis. Lessig is suing Liberation Music because he wants labels to stop relying on automated systems to send out takedown notices."
    • As vidders well know, hosting sites for their fanworks tend to be more limited than those for other media, and they have often booted fan content entirely when the sites changes their marketing focus. The latest site to evict fan videos is Blip.tv, which deleted content within the past week. The OTW has some tips about alternatives for video makers and the top pick is Critical Commons. Though academic in nature, they welcome fanworks, support fair use, and provide a good alternative to commercial sites such as Vimeo and YouTube. The site already hosts some key works that are part of vidding history.
    • A new software program, Plotagon, offers a way to create a paint-by-numbers fanwork. "Available for Mac and PC, the basic 'city' version of Plotagon software is free and includes five actors and six environments. To create a Plotagon movie, users simply choose characters and an environment, type a script, add a few stage directions and press 'play.' Plotagon movies can be shared online and viewed at Plotagon.com/movies." Properties include Alice in Wonderland and Pride and Prejudice.

    What fanwork and intellectual property stories have you seen? Write about it on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Audiovisual histories

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 4 August 2013 - 6:34pm
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    Picture of a cassette tape with post title caption

    • A few posts have recently discussed fannish audiovisual works. One was at Learned Fangirl which examined musical remix culture. "One advantage in analyzing the creativity surrounding Daft Punk’s Get Lucky is that the original visuals doesn’t matter to the re-imaginings at all. This allows the public to focus on the brilliance that is possible with just the reuse and re-purposing of the music." Addressing a frequent criticism, writer Raizel insisted "All of these works **are** transformative – all of them have the original and change it into something new and different. Instead of stripping away the economic value of the song, they have increased it. Fans found this song meaningful and 'made it their own', helping others find the fun as well."
    • At The Daily Dot, Gavia Baker-Whitelaw explored the evolution of fandom mixtape culture. "Fanmixes can be created as the soundtrack to a fanfic, but they’re just as likely to be like a normal mixtape: capturing a particular moment or mood. It’s just [rather] than being 'breakup songs of 2007,' the mood in question is more likely to be 'music on the theme of defeating Voldemort.'" The importance of new online platforms was cited as a breakthrough. "With the advent of playlist sites like 8tracks and Spotify, fanmixing has become a lot more accessible. Up until recently, mixes were mostly uploaded onto file-sharing websites and then posted to LiveJournal communities, meaning listeners had to commit to downloading the whole thing. Plus, there was the ever-present threat of copyright infringement (the boogeyman of fandom), so a lot of those communities were members only."
    • Polygon.com featured "an eight-minute CGI piece called The Lord Inquisitor: Prologue" which "represents a reaction, of sorts, to an official 2010 film called Warhammer Ultramarines, which failed to meet the hopes of many in the 40K community." While the creators hope to eventually make a 40 minute film that's financed by outside producers, they feel they are taking a fannish angle to the project. "'They take your favorite thing and they make it crappy. You get disappointed. You want something better, You realize that in order to do that you need to engage and spend your own time to make that happen. That is the fundamental thing our group is trying to prove...Hollywood has this money-driven agenda to produce things that sell. But fans can create things that are more in-depth, more challenging, more fun.'"

    What audiovisual histories do you know about? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom lessons

    By Claudia Rebaza on Monday, 22 July 2013 - 4:38pm
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    • Movies.com noticed the fandom angle in its review of the documentary Spook Central. "In a similar vein to Room 237, Spook Central is a documentary that asks fans to explain their theories about the hidden meanings in Ivan Reitman's 1984 film about a team of nerds who use science to bust ghosts. What hidden meanings, you ask? We don't know. We thought it was a pretty straightforward genre mash-up, but apparently director Ivo Shandor found enough of them to turn it into a feature film. Or maybe he's using a movie as apparently transparent as Ghostbusters to gently mock overly analytical movies like Room 237?"
    • Suzanne Walker wrote in the Oxford University Press blog about her involvement in superhero fandom. "I have always been an eager student of American history, and superheroes offer an important reflection not only on our current society but also on our own cultural history...It’s quite telling, for example, that it took until the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s for Marvel to create its first African-American superhero, the Black Panther, and that one of Ms. Magazine’s first covers was an image of Wonder Woman in 1972, heralding the second-wave feminist movement. More recently, I re-watched the 2008 Iron Man film and was struck by how dated it already is even five years later. It’s extremely attuned to the politics of the late Bush years, and strives to offer commentary on the United States’ wars abroad even as it delivers high-flying adventures with Tony Stark."
    • Blogger Luz Delfondo wrote about Five lessons I learned from fandom and how fandom can expand people's awareness of story content. The lessons? 1. Characters of different races are not interchangeable, 2. Asexuality is a lot more complicated than just not wanting to have sex, 3. You can’t just say you’re going to give marginalized characters their due. You have to do it, 4. All kinks are normal, and 5. Together, women can form a powerful and just community of writers and editors. "When I write fic about female characters kicking ass, my beta readers (fandom lingo for editors) cheer me on. When I read a sex scene between two women, I can be almost certain a woman wrote it. I’ve had a reader tell me that she’s taken quotes from my fic and tacked it to her bedroom wall. I’ve had a reader tell me that a fic I wrote helped her think more deeply about her own gender identity and sexuality. It touches me deeply that I’ve had an impact on other women that way."

    What lessons have you learned from fandom? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Keeping up with the times

    By Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 3 March 2013 - 7:44pm
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    • The experience of BioWare and EA, developer and publisher of multiplayer online role-playing game Star Wars: The Old Republic suggests that addressing problems of representation should probably not be done after the fact. While many were happy to hear the company would be introducing same-sex romance options to the game, the announcement received both the usual homophobic backlash as well as disappointment from same-sex romance supporters of how slowly and how poorly the gamers were accommodated. "These characters will only be available via Rise of the Hutt Cartel, an expansion pack to be released in Spring 2012 [sic], meaning that players will have to pay to be gay in the game. SGR will also only be limited to Makeb, a planet that has been dubbed as a "gay ghetto" by multiple media outlets."
    • The Daily Dot also wrote about two fans' live-action remake of Toy Story and included Pixar employee tweets stating "Remember when being a big fan of a movie only meant you could quote all the dialogue?"
    • Deirdre Macken of The Australian would likely prefer those fans of old. Lamenting "the extinction of literature's audience", she wrote "Instead of readers, a writer today will have fans who pay homage to the author by plagiarising their style in fan fiction. Instead of readers, a writer will have followers, for whom a retweet is as good as a read, user reviews (especially if mum knows her way around Amazon), festival audiences, theatre audiences and even corporate audiences, but few solitary sessions with a reader. The writer is downloaded into the library of good intentions but never read." She also later adds "LOL, imagine linking SMS to literature" apparently unaware that writers have indeed published novels through tweets and texts since at least 2007.
    • Macken doesn't seem to be the only one failing to keep up with cultural developments. Scott Sterling at Digital Trends thinks much the same of the TBS show King of the Nerds. "We all knew someone like the contestants described above, but somewhere along the line, we became them. Comic-book movies dominate theaters and fan-fic tops best-seller lists. Coding is widely practiced. Almost every person uses a computer on a daily basis, and half of us carry one in our pocket. The fact that mainstream culture has adopted nerds and their activities as their own is no revelation. The point is not that nerds are cool, as any commentary of The Big Bang Theory seems to end with, but rather that King of the Nerds makes it painfully obvious that we’re all nerds, at least in the traditional sense of the word that anyone of a certain generation grew up with."

    What fandom changes have you seen during your time in it? Write about your experiences in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Examining fan activities

    By Claudia Rebaza on Friday, 22 February 2013 - 8:42pm
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    • A post on The MarySue took a more psychological look at the "Fake Geek Girl" syndrome. "The theory of microaggressions was developed back in the 70′s to denote racial stereotyping, but was expanded by psychologist Derald Wing Sue, Ph.D. in 2007 to encompass a wide variety and classifications of these subtle and seemingly harmless expressions that communicate 'hostile, derogatory, or negative slights and insults' toward people who aren’t members of the ingroup. These outgroup members might include women, racial/ethnic minorities, LBGT members, and others historically marginalized in our community." Author Dr. Andrea Letamendi explained the anger such behavior can engender. "The feelings of being threatened, invalidated, and overlooked can happen to any one of us in this community–some psychologists argue that when the threats are ambiguous or subtle (like microaggressions), they can be more damaging because there is no certainty and the assault is denied or ignored."
    • More complaints about sexism arose in response to a documentary on Bronie fandom. "What do you get when fans decide to make a documentary about their own fandom? In the case of the Bronies—fans of My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic—the answer seems to be erasure and exclusion. So say some fandom critics of the recently released documentary Bronies: The Extremely Unexpected Adult Fans of My Little Pony. Not everyone in the Brony fandom is happy about the newly launched documentary. Female fans are already planning their own documentary in response, to give a more inclusive portrayal of fans—particularly the female sector of the Brony population, which many fans claim was virtually ignored."
    • Another fan documentary fundraising on Kickstarter will be focusing on the makers of fan films. In a chat with OTW staff, co-producer Joey Rassool discussed the project's focus. "We hope to show several things: 1) Why fan films tend to be more accurate to the source material than their hollywood equivalents, 2) Why even greatly funded fan films still end up with problems, 3) What these creators, especially the ones working out of their own pockets, have to sacrifice to bring their art to life, and 4) What kind of person is willing and capable of making those sacrifices." Asked how he thought a view of fan film makers might map onto the work that other fans do in other mediums, he replied "I find that film is a shockingly tricky art form for fan made content because of the amount of time, energy, people, and finances that have to go into it to generate a final product. But I hope that our film can show everyone that creates fan based content that any amount of effort is worth it for the final result." They also plan to focus on how fans "manage the aspects of filmmaking. Most fan films are made by crews and directors with little to no big budget experience, and the introduction of crowd funding can put a lot of money into some fairly unseasoned hands. This means that things can go wrong at almost any turn."

    What examinations of My Little Pony, fangirls or fandoms have caught your attention? Tell us about it in Fanlore. Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Links roundup for 27 August 2012

    By Claudia Rebaza on Monday, 27 August 2012 - 8:44pm
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    Here's a roundup of fandom celebration stories that might be of interest to fans:

    • A South by Southwest (SXSW) panel with OTW connections has been proposed for inclusion at the event's 2013 lineup. "Catching Fire? Or Not. Fans, Creativity & Fair Use" would include Joshua Wattles of deviantART, Inc., Flourish Klink of The Alchemists, Heidi Tandy of HP Education Fanon, Inc. (HPEF) and FAWC, Inc. and Lisa Bunker of the Pima County Public Library. "This panel will be a frank discussion about the laws that protect fan-creators of transformative works, the gray areas of copyright and fair use, why fan creativity is usually not infringement, and the issues that corporations will have when trying to capitalize on fan culture." (Visitors must create an account to vote for the panel proposal).
    • For a lot of fans, fandom doesn't end with their death -- at least not immediately. Filmmaker Errol Morris recently produced a short film titled Team Spirit about the funeral plans of hardcore fans. He probably should have included the obituary of baseball fan Marylou Belles. While acknowledging she was a fan of Stephen King, her loved ones noted "She was also a lifelong Mets fan, though surprisingly, that wasn't what killed her."
    • Given the strife that occurs in some fandoms, death-by-fannishness might not be so farfetched, but at least one member of Fringe fandom took to the Huffington Post to declare how welcoming it was. "The support I received was overwhelming. I was the new kid on the block but I was met with an incredible welcome. I continue to post my reactions after each episode because I love interacting with the show's fans. They have enriched my Fringe viewing experience. They shield me from spoilers and even created a Twitter hashtag (#HurryUpMary) to get me caught up by the season five premiere. How many fandoms treat their newbies like that?"
    • Of course, sometimes when fannish work crosses over to pro, the result doesn't make fans stand up and cheer. Such was the case with the Mortal Kombat fanfilm that became the officially sponsored web series "Legacy." However, in the sixth episode, fan creator, Tancharoen, stated that he was now given sole creative control and that it was written in the original style he had first envisioned. The result? "It was 10-times better than the previous five that I had struggled to sit through," said Jordan McCollam, writing for Gamebeat. McCollam then concluded, "I guess the main point I’m trying to make is this: Fan-made media is awesome, but it’s only awesome because it’s fan-made. Until making movies and television shows stops being about the money, and until studio heads stop feeling the need to pander to the lowest-common denominator, fan-made media will never have a home at major studios. Maybe we should just leave it alone, no matter how excited we are about a favorite franchise."

    If you've got things to celebrate about fandom, make sure they're remembered with an entry in Fanlore. Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Links roundup for 21 August 2012

    By Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 21 August 2012 - 3:32pm
    Message type:

    Here's a roundup of pro intersections with fandom stories that might be of interest to fans:

    • While publishers have been putting out professional fanworks as long as commercial publishing has existed, they used to do all they could to separate themselves from the amateur version. Not anymore, apparently. Two recent examples occurred when Marie Claire excused a photoshopped cover of a non-consenting royal model as "fan art" and when Titan Books decided to promote a Supernatural tie-in novel as "fan fiction." This came in the same month as the actor who played The Punisher decided to make his own "fan film" as "a love letter to Frank Castle & his fans."
    • Historically, the movement from fan to pro generally went the other way with many an author going from fanfic to commercially published work. This is even more common now when they can go it alone and self-publish. One writer who stopped submitting to publishers said "'It’s entirely possible that I gave up too soon...But after hearing other writers’ experiences, I thought well, geez, I’m nearly 40 years old. Do I want to spend the next five to seven years pushing others to do the job for me when I could do it myself in the span of a month?'"
    • Indeed fanfic writers have various possibilities open to them, even if they do throw in their lot with a publishing house. For example, they could try publishing fanfic of previously published fanfic or simply making sure their canon is part of the public domain. "Total E-Bound has brought out an adaptation of a Sir Arthur Conan ­Doyle tale in which his celebrated detective Sherlock Holmes embarks on a gay relationship with his sidekick Dr Watson. The new version of Bronte’s Jane Eyre includes a graphic sex scene between Jane and Mr Rochester." The Clandestine Classics label will also "include ­Dracula, Treasure Island, Wuthering Heights, The Three Musketeers and Phantom Of The Opera."

    Have you gone pro? Do you have stories about those who have? Pop them into Fanlore which will always remain a fan-made, fan-run resource.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup at transformativeworks.org. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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