Fannish Practices

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Creations

    Kiri Van Santen on Thursday, 19 June 2014 - 5:29pm
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    fandom creations

    • io9 traced the history of the term 'meta'. "Today, the word meta has undergone another transformation, largely because of the intensely self-referential fandom community online... This has meant that many shows have meta episodes that are basically fan service. So meta has become a popular trope, and fans have responded by using the term meta to describe these kinds of episodes. But more importantly, fans have transformed the word meta yet again, turning it from an adjective that describes a kind of story into a noun that refers to a form of fan commentary. These days, any essay, rant, or analysis written by a fan is often dubbed 'a meta.'"
    • Gizmodo highlighted a Blade Runner Tribute Art Show which "brought some really succulent Blade Runner fanfiction along with it. On display starting at 7PM on May 31st at the Bottleneck Gallery in Williamsburg, Brooklyn Moments Lost will feature...eight unique stories based off of the Blade Runner mythos. Each story matches up with an individual original track off the CD created by Analogue Sweeden, as well as a piece artwork on display."
    • All Geek to Me began a feature about fandom tattoos. "You know you are a serious geek when you get your love for a fandom etched into your skin. Fandom Ink is all about celebrating your geek ink and most importantly, finding out the story about why you got that tattoo! We here at All Geek to Me love a good story and awesome art, thus this new column that will be featuring awesome tattoos."
    • A post at Kentucky Sports Radio encouraged readers to write fanfiction and offered some ideas. "In this issue we celebrate the 2013 Reds baseball season as we prepare for the Reds to repeat as champions! We all remember the dominance of Cueto and Chapman last postseason, as well as the heroics from Joey Votto, whose hitting with runners in scoring position was fantastic. After beating the Pirates in the WildCard Playoff (a game they just couldn’t have choked away, they never do that!) the RedLegs began their magical run to the World Series where they beat the Red Sox in six games."

    What fandom creations have stuck with you? Create some entries for them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fanfiction in the lexicon

    Claudia Rebaza on Sunday, 8 June 2014 - 4:43pm
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    Banner by James of a quill pen resting on a sheet of paper with writing on it

    • Gamescene hosted a paper on Fanfiction as Critical Play. "By allowing the larger fan community to access and interact with the fanfiction, the piece contributes to the larger agency of the fans over the source universe. This allows for more fans to participate in the remolding of a fiction that they did not create, examining societal, cultural, political, and personal themes through both the inherently subversive act of writing fanfiction, and through the content and themes contained within the individual fanfiction. The fanfiction writer employs concepts such as unplaying, reskinning, and rewriting in order to acknowledge and further explore the subversive elements of their version of the source. This makes fanfiction a form of critical play."
    • The Asian Age discussed Bollywood fanfiction. “'The joy lies in weaving new narratives with the characters you love,' says Aayat Malik, a DU student and Fanfiction writer whose present work-in-progress brings Harry Potter’s Patil twins to Mumbai after completing their magical education at Hogwarts, also incorporating characters from the recent Hindi movie, Hasee Toh Phasee...She goes on to point out how visiting many popular Indian entertainment websites brings to notice that the largest volume in terms of the sheer number and length of Fanfiction writings exists in the realm of Indian television."
    • Gizmodo explained design fanfiction. "There's actually an existing analog for this trend: Fanfiction. The comparison isn't as far flung as it seems. It's just where fanfic writers turn their own creativity upon existing characters and plot lines from their favorite books or TV shows, designers turn to their favorite Brands. Spec episodes of My Little Pony and ludicrous concepts for the next iPhone have a lot in common."
    • Various media outlets took note of the fannish terms, such as fangirl, being added to the dictionary by Merriam-Webster. The Times of India devoted some time to explaining 'shipping'. "Usually, fans will give a couple their own moniker, often a portmanteau of their names. X-Files fans liked to use Sculder or MSR (quite simply Mulder-Scully Romance). Any kind of relationship can be acknowledged. From the obvious 'will they, won't they' couples to inter-species intimacy, one rule of the shipping community is that if at least one person wants to see a certain pairing, then it's a legitimate ship. Nor is it limited to modern-day culture; you'll find sites dedicated to shipping the heroes and heroines of classic literature, such as Jo and Laurie in Little Women."

    What fanfiction terms have you learned about? Create some entries for them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Changing how things are done

    Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 31 May 2014 - 4:38pm
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    • PBS's Idea Channel did a piece on "The Future of Fandom" and featured discussion about fans' effects on copyright, including the stance of the OTW and the work of OTW legal staffer, Rebecca Tushnet. "In 'I'm a Lawyer, Not an Ethnographer, Jim': Textual Poachers and Fair Use, Rebecca Tushnet explains Henry Jenkins' sense that 'fans usually enjoy [an original work], but also see its flaws and gaps, which their work attempts to address and, sometimes, redress.' Fan works like Fanfic, fanvids and remixes celebrate, critique and extend beloved media, but they also exist in uncertain legal territory. They're necessarily built on copyrighted material, the owners of which are occasionally super hostile to any co-option, even loving co-option." (Transcript available)
    • While not directly connected to fandom, a recent court ruling raised concerns about what can be published about people online. NPR's All Things Considered discussed the potential changes. "Usually, the content that we talk about with the right to be forgotten is much more salacious. This guy wanted an old debt to be removed from his Google search results. He took his complaint to the Spanish Data Protection Agency, who determined that he did have a case for the right to be forgotten. And the agency ordered Google to remove links to that content. It moved through the courts as Google appealed it and the case that came down was shocking, I think, for most people."
    • Another court ruling included discussion about fan sites and works more specifically. The Supreme Court ruled on the case of Petrella v. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, a case in which the owner of a screenplay alleged copyright infringement. In her opinion, Justice Ginsburg stated the following: "[T]here is nothing untoward about waiting to see whether an infringer’s exploitation undercuts the value of the copyrighted work, has no effect on the original work, or even complements it. Fan sites prompted by a book or film, for example, may benefit the copyright owner. See Wu, Tolerated Use, 31 Colum. J. L. & Arts 617, 619–620 (2008). Even if an infringement is harmful, the harm may be too small to justify the cost of litigation."
    • While some think that fanfiction should be licensed in the future, the Deseret News wrote about Lucasfilm's decision to wipe out earlier canon, turning it into licensed fanfic. "Lucasfilm announced the Star Wars Story Group in January, which was created specifically to sift through the plethora of Expanded Universe content and decide what was and wasn’t canon, according to BleedingCool.com. The answer? Apparently none of it was. But it’s not all bad news for Expanded Universe fans...Instead, it will be rebranded as 'Star Wars Legends' and continue to be published and made available to fans."

    What examples of fans' changing things have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom and food

    Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 24 May 2014 - 3:27pm
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    Banner by Ania of the edge of a food plate

    • Singapore Showbiz wrote about the rise of TV-themed dinners surrounding fandoms with a strong focus on food. "Passionate fans have even taken it upon themselves to create a Game of Thrones' cookbook...with recipes for the dishes described in the series." The group featured has "plans for more TV- themed dinners, with plans for 'The Hunger Games', 'Downton Abbey', and 'Hannibal' dinners in the works."
    • As an article on KDrama Stars points out, fan meetings with or without food are hardly new. The Korean Drama Group started as a yahoo group in 2003 and has been meeting annually. Its fans discussed how their interest branched out from TV shows. "Some of the group's members have been inspired to learn more about Korean culture. Some take language and Korean cooking lessons. Some members of the group traveled to Korea on the k-drama tour inspired by 'Winter Sonata.'"
    • Eating celebrations can be city-wide as shown in this article by Colorado Public Radio on Star Wars themed events in Denver. "The vegetarian restaurant City O’ City and its adjoining live art space Deer Pile are hosting their third annual 'May the Fourth Be With You' party. This year, Mutiny Information Cafe, 3 Kings Tavern and City Hall have joined the roster of venues participating in the interplanetary festivities, helping spread the 'Star Wars' fandom from South Broadway through Capitol Hill."
    • MomClick featured one fan who connected with actor/writer B.J. Novak through food. "Known for his role as the intern on the popular NBC sitcom 'The Office,' he was also one of the writers for the series...In honor of Novak's book...Jen's sugar cookies were shaped and decorated around a theme of one of [his] stories, 'From the story about a red shirt, a mirror the size of Earth, to a story about what happened when the tortoise rematched the hare...I tried to get as creative as possible and to add a little bit more showmanship. They were delivered in a box decorated as the book jacket.'”

    What examples of fandom and food have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Authentic fandom

    Claudia Rebaza on Saturday, 17 May 2014 - 3:37pm
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    • An article in Connecticut College’s The College Voice insisted that there's no room for art that isn't "original", complaining about the success of cover bands. "Wicked Peach is certainly an example of this. One sophomore said her adoration for the band was because 'they play songs I like without trying to make it their own.' The Cover Band is Pop without the music. Wicked Peach is not music; it’s entertainment. They haven’t contributed a single original note to the universe, but they can certainly get 200 hundred drunk ’90s kids into a mosh pit. In their defense, at least they’re upfront about their unoriginality. With the majority of Pop music consisting of the same four chords, most contemporary music is essentially just slight variations on what’s come before."
    • "Phony" fandom remains an issue for many Deadspin readers who took offense at a profile of soccer fans. "As insufferable as the characters in the story come off, I'd much rather have a beer with them than with anyone who tells someone else they're being a fan the wrong way. This is the 22-year-old at a punk show scoffing at the 15-year-old who probably didn't even know about the band until its major-label release...The self-important fan is convinced his fandom is a signifier of something larger than liking the sport. The self-confident fan doesn't give a shit what brings other people to the sport. Be the self-confident fan."
    • A post at io9 's Observation Deck instead asked at what point you should "turn in your fan card." "I haven't really cared since about anything 'new' related to Star Wars. Pink Five was the best thing Star Wars to come out since the extended editions (and when I say that, know that I refused to buy the extended edition on video), and of course it was fan-made. I couldn't be arsed to watch more than a bit of the Clone Wars. I haven't even clicked on the recent casting announcements. But still, if I'm flipping through channels late at night and come across A New Hope on some godforsaken channel, or if I'm suddenly in the mood and grab my DVD of The Empire Strikes Back I'm transfixed again...So, I'm definitely still a Star Wars fan. I guess. From a certain point of view."
    • This review of a My Little Pony parody concludes that fandom doesn't have to be tragic. "This is probably the hardest comic I’ve ever had to give a rating to. Much like My Little Pony itself, it’s not my cup of tea, but there’s nothing particular wrong with it. It promises a parody of bronies and fandom culture and it delivers upon that just fine. I think the moral of this story is this: Regardless of your fandom, enjoy it the way you wish to enjoy it, and let others do the same. If you absolutely feel the need to argue your opinions to other members of your fandom please do so calmly and constructively and don’t bully others for disagreeing with you."

    What fandom authenticity debates have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • TWC's Top 10

    Claudia Rebaza on Thursday, 8 May 2014 - 5:00pm
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    Partial view of the TWC word cloud

    One of the OTW's projects is Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC), an open-access academic journal dedicated to fandom and fandom studies.

    But don't think that just because it's a peer-reviewed, scholarly quarterly with a bibliographic listing in the MLA bibliography of journals that the contents of TWC aren't for fans like you to enjoy!  Check out this sampling, ranked by number of DOI resolutions:

    1) "Why we should talk about commodifying fan work", by Nele Noppe. How would legalizing fanwork influence the question: should fan work be free?

    2) "Book Review: Boys' love manga: Essays on the sexual ambiguity and cross-cultural fandom of the genre"by Nele Noppe. "The focus of the book remains squarely on the fans of boys' love manga, which makes it relevant to anyone interested in fan studies."

    3) "Women, "Star Trek," and the early development of fannish vidding", by Francesca Coppa. This paper discusses how early female Star Trek fans structured the practices and aesthetics of vidding, in order to heal the wounds created by the displacement and fragmentation of women on television.

    4) "'The epic love story of Sam and Dean': 'Supernatural,' queer readings, and the romance of incestuous fan fiction," by Catherine Tosenberger. Tosenberger examines the literary, cultural, and folkloric discourses of incest and queerness as invoked by the show in order to argue that "Wincest" fan fiction is best understood not as a perverse, oppositional reading of a manly dudebro show, but as an expression of readings that are suggested and supported by the text itself.

    5) "Endless loop: A brief history of chiptunes", by Kevin Driscoll and Joshua Diaz. Driscoll and Diaz explore the confusion surrounding what chiptunes is, and how the production and performance of music connected to 80's electronic video game soundtracks "tells an alternate narrative about the hardware, software, and social practices of personal computing in the 1980s and 1990s."

    6) "Stranger than fiction: Fan identity in cosplay", by Nicolle Lamerichs. Lamerichs argues that "costuming is a form of fan appropriation that transforms, performs, and actualizes an existing story in close connection to the fan's own identity," and that "cosplay motivates fans to closely interpret existing texts, perform them, and extend them with their own narratives and ideas."

    7) "Repackaging fan culture", by Suzanne Scott. Scott argues that "the strategic definition of fandom as a gift economy serves as a defensive front to impede encroaching industrial factions" like FanLib and Kindle Worlds, and examines "the Seinfeldian roots" of the social taboo of "regifting," relative to fan culture.

    8) "Thirty political video mashups made between World War II and 2005", by Jonathan McIntosh. The creator of the famed Buffy vs. Edward remix vid explores subversive pre-YouTube remixes.

    9) "Book review: Spreadable media: Creating value and meaning in a networked culture, by Henry Jenkins, Sam Ford, and Joshua Green", by Melissa A. Click. "Readers with stakes in the tug-of-war between fans and industry will likely enjoy, and be invigorated by, the authors' arguments about spreadability."

    10) "The Web planet: How the changing Internet divided "Doctor Who" fan fiction writers", by Leora Hadas. Hadas explores how evolving participatory culture clashed with traditional fandom modes and came to a head over one Whovian fanfic archive, using the conflict there to argue that "the cultural logics of fandom and of participatory culture might be more separate than they initially appear."

    And if you want to move beyond the Top 10 articles on TWC, here's a word cloud of the most frequently used words taken from the titles of every article that TWC has published in its 6-year history.

    Would you like to help us generate even more words? Head over to Fanhackers to see how you can celebrate acafandom, meta, and more with us—or check out the TWC Submissions Guidelines for submitting your research or essay to the journal!

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom love & hate

    Claudia Rebaza on Wednesday, 7 May 2014 - 6:01pm
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    • At New Statesman, Elizabeth Minkel discussed tension between fans and content creators. "[M]aybe it’s best to think of fan/creator relations through the lens of 'mutually assured destruction', in the sense that 'they’re allowing me to do what I want, so I’ll enable them through what they want'. Just because we can see each other – and just because we can potentially even talk to each other – doesn’t mean it’s actually a good deal to directly engage with each other...social media continues to transform the way we communicate...it’s not the historical barriers in place, but perhaps instead the ones we continue to erect, out of mutual respect, that help to keep making television worth getting invested in."
    • The Columbia Chronicle looked instead at fan vs. fan. "In 2006, Grieve and a colleague conducted a study to measure how fans view opposing teams and found that when the home team lost, fans were more likely to deem visiting fans unfriendly, rude and untrustworthy than when the home team won. Fans sometimes take their negative attitudes toward rival groups too far, Grieve said, adding that some are emotionally attached to a team simply because they enjoy the confrontational nature of fandom rather than the camaraderie and socialization benefits."
    • Lizzie Yin wrote in The Global Times about how she was an anti-fan. " I'll admit that I once used to like some of my targets. From my perspective, many of the anti-fans out there have a history like me. They used to like somebody or some band, then they grew out of it, and felt embarrassed or ashamed of that past history, since they later found those people 'uncool.' Exactly like the fans, the anti-fans also spend a great amount of time, energy and resources in hating somebody, passionately."
    • At Geek Tyrant, Mick Joest complained about tests of fannishness. "[G]eeks have evolved into something well beyond the current umbrella we share. Table-top gamers may have no interest in Firefly, and the Browncoats could not give a flip less about Manga readers. PC gamers may log 100s of hours in DOTA and never watch an actual episode of the original Star Trek, and that's completely fine. It doesn't make you more or less of geek to have your hands in multiple cookie jars of fandom, and it's that kind of pissing contest of 'who's more popular' that drove many people into the less mainstream interests we share today. "

    What examples of fandom love & hate have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Understanding fandom

    Claudia Rebaza on Monday, 28 April 2014 - 4:12pm
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    Banner by Alice with the post title over 4 symbols - lips, an ear, a thumbs up and a sheet of paper

    • Dartmouth College's Special Collections Library profiled 19th century fanfic."After the success of Charles Dickens' "Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club" in 1837, George Reynolds took the characters on a new picaresque journey in "Pickwick Abroad: or, the Tour in France" published in monthly parts from 1837-38. Our first single-volume edition from 1839 acknowledges its debt to Mr. Dickens (or 'Boz'), but also cites a review from The Age boasting that '"Pickwick Abroad" is so well done by G. W. M. Reynolds, that we must warn Boz to look to his laurels.'"
    • The very confusion over published work and what "counts" was explored by Raizel Liebler, discussing Fanfic or Canon? "The removal of Aaron McGruder from the fourth season of the Boondocks on Cartoon Network is another recent example of the difficulty for fans to figure out what 'counts' and what doesn’t. As fans of Community (during last season), fans of Gargoyles, and fans of Gilmore Girls confronted before — does a show continue to be canon when the major creative force behind it leaves? Does whether some cultural production count as canon or fanon matter whether it is officially authorized?"
    • Melbourne's Herald Sun featured a number of photos from the collection of Tom Broadbent, who explored furry fandom. He "gained the trust of Furries in the UK and spent time capturing the lives of the people inside the suit. By day they are computer programmers, engineers, mortgage brokers and fursuit makers. By night they live a life role-playing their 'fursona' — the animal they have chosen to live as, generally in private. They communicate across internet forums and meet up at conventions, keeping one thing sacred — their human identity."
    • Lady Geek Girl wrote about the LiveJournal community Fandom Grammar. "The Fandom Grammar team is made up of fans from a variety of fandoms who have made it their mission to provide friendly grammatical instruction to the internet masses. They do this in a variety of ways. One way, as I discovered, was by answering tricky grammar and style questions about fandom subjects. Aside from my Harry Potter question, they have covered such varied topics as how to effectively write lolcat speech in fanfic and how to deal with transliteration in fandoms whose source language is not English."

    What fandom explorations have caught your interest? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Wherefore fandom?

    Claudia Rebaza on Thursday, 24 April 2014 - 6:28pm
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    Banner by Lisa of grafitti with the words

    • Kristin Bezio wrote at The Learned Fangirl about responses to a post on Anita Sarkeesian, and defended critical fandom. "This commenter clearly has no concept of how popular culture reflects and shapes society, and I’m fairly certain I’m not going to be able to convince him (presumably) that it does, since he appears to be one of those people who doesn’t realize that his opinions about the universe have been constructed by his life-long exposure to media (including games) and society. Clearly his opinions were plopped into his brain by Truth Itself."
    • Rockford College Radio's The Sports Ethicist looked at fandom paradoxes. "In her paper, 'Being a Sports Fan: Paradox and Intrinsic Value,' Prof. Gwen Bradford (Rice University) defends a view of the value of being a sports fan based on the idea that it is a good thing for fans to value the good of their team winning. This, however, seems to lead to a paradox because fans do not value the same good when their team’s opponents win. Prof. Bradford and Shawn Klein discuss the value of being a fan, this paradox, and other issues arising in fandom." (No transcript available).
    • At The Effingham Daily News, Ryan Czachorski also looked at sports fandom and changing allegiances. "[L]et’s all don all our colors and logos and apparel, and keep it at that. Most people around here can root for the Cardinals, some will root for the White Sox, and I’ll root for the Cubs until they break my spirit (ETA: May 12). And when St. Louis finishes better, don’t ask me to convert. It’s just not going to happen. I mean, come on, I have a Cubs bathing suit. We’re past the point of no return here."
    • The New York Observer wrote about the demise of a site which always cast a critical eye on culture: Television Without Pity. "See, this is what you get when you take a buyout from Bravo/NBC (as TVWoP did in 2008)—the off-chance that you’ll be unplugged, and that your death will be noted in a roundup of other sites, like DailyCandy, which are also being taken offline by your parent company. We cannot overstate the importance of the site that spawned Tara Ariano and all of Previously.TV—it was the site all of my friends and I would read in college to find out about Battlestar and Buffy."

    What critical fandom posts have you seen? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Fandom Changing & Changed

    Claudia Rebaza on Tuesday, 22 April 2014 - 4:10pm
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    Banner by Bremo of Pikachu dancing in excitement while a horde of other Pokémon characters look on in annoyance.

    • Slate was among several sites which wrote about the fanfiction-writing, Avengers-loving Ms Marvel. However, Slate also pointed out the important role fandom had in launching her. "A diverse and exuberant fan community, the Carol Corps, emerged almost overnight and began tweeting, blogging and cosplaying their love for both the character and DeConnick. (It’s worth noting that in addition to offering sharp writing and great stories, the new series let Carol trade her revealing leotard and domino mask for an actual body-covering uniform.)"
    • As The Daily Dot points out, fans will also appropriate existing heroes to address current concerns. "Most of the time, fandom’s remix culture is about taking a particular detail from a book or movie, and expanding upon it until it tells the story you wanted to hear in the first place." Captain America is an interesting example of this treatment. "There’s even an ongoing debate on Tumblr over just what aspects of Cap’s backstory would support the widespread headcanon that Steve Rogers is a feminist, socialist, socially liberal guy."
    • At Reflexive Horizons, Laz Carter writes about Pokémon and a Fandom of Nostalgia. "[T]the very ‘franchise’ model propagated by Pokémon – wherein one can consume the Pokémon universe through not only film but also animated television series, videogames, comics, trading card games, theme parks, merchandise and a plethora of other Poké-paraphernalia – means that any attempt to usefully separate one medium from the rest remains a futile endeavour that does not benefit any serious study." Carter argues that "When examining examples of ‘franchise fandom’, one must account for the fact that a consumer’s experiences of any given aspect of the product will affect their appreciation of the remainder...I argue that 2014 has seen a revival of ‘Poké-mania’, albeit a different brand of the fervour which had been evident during the peak of Pokémon’s success."
    • kpopstarz also looks at changing fandom, specifically Idol Fandom. "The beginning of 1st generation idols, H.O.T, was labeled the 'teen's idol.' However, idols are no longer the exclusive property of teen fans. As the idol market grew, idol fandoms have been overtaken by fans in their 20s and 30s...These adult fans are nothing to be trifled with, and are showing great influence. Now idol groups must not only target teens, but also focus on catering to the 2030 fans." However, these new fans show a very old pattern of behavior. "Upon conducting a survey, it was found that many fans in their 20s keep their activity on fan sites a secret. In many cases their identity as a fan was kept a secret to everyone except maybe some family members or close friends."

    What fandom developments have you been seeing? Write about them on Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in an OTW Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

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