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  • OTW Fannews: Awesome creations

    By Claudia Rebaza on Perjantai, 24 May 2013 - 3:18i.p.
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    • Mother Jones wrote about Jennie Lamere, who recently won the "best in show" award at the national TVnext Hack event by helping fans avoid spoilers on Twitter. She did it by writing "Twivo, a new program that allows Twitter users to censor their feeds from mentioning a certain TV show (and its characters) for a set time period." She was the only solo woman participating. "Hackathons (which have nothing to do with illegal hacking) bring together programmers, developers, and designers, who compete to code an innovative new program in a limited amount of time." Lamere has already been approached by a company to market her creation. "She came up with the idea for Twivo the night before the competition, and it took her 10 hours and 150 lines of code to complete."
    • Fan creativity isn't just becoming a given, it's beginning to be demanded as well. Kotaku posted about "Little Witch Academia...an animated 30-minute short released by Studio Trigger on YouTube" which was "produced as a part of the 'Young Animator Training Project'." Noting that anime fandom had successfully instigated a series from their response to an ad, writer Patricia Hernandez urged them to do the same with this project.
    • While non-scripted TV shows tend to lag in terms of fanwork creations, there's at least one fan video out there, "Hold Up, Bro" that can make people take note that they exist. "Lisa Ferreira recreated last week’s episode in Legos, showing how three idols led to Phillip’s exit. It’s fantastic and kind of shocking that Legos are so effective at representing Survivor cast members and locations." Ferreira then added " a full-length song and musical number...written and performed by Lisa and her brother Matthew Willcott."

    What cool fanworks have you seen lately? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Privacy and preservation

    By Claudia Rebaza on Torstai, 7 March 2013 - 7:18i.p.
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    • Salon warned consumers that entertainment driven by data gathering "won't end well." Author Andrew Leonard described how much Netflix knew about his viewing experience with a particular show: "I hit the pause button roughly one-third of the way through the first episode of 'House of Cards,'...Netflix, by far the largest provider of commercial streaming video programming in the United States, registers hundreds of millions of such events...Netflix doesn’t know merely what we’re watching, but when, where and with what kind of device we’re watching. It keeps a record of every time we pause the action — or rewind, or fast-forward — and how many of us abandon a show entirely after watching for a few minutes...Netflix might not know exactly why I personally hit the pause button...but if enough people pause or rewind or fast-forward at the same place during the same show, the data crunchers can start to make some inferences."
    • The government also wants to know what we're doing with our devices. Discussing the release of Twitter's transparency report, The Verge says "Governments seemed more interested in user data last year, making 1,858 information requests (by comparison, Google received a total of 21,389 requests from data just in the second half of 2012). There wasn't a huge shift in any category in the second half of the year for Twitter except for government takedown requests, which rose from 6 to 42." The majority of takedown requests came under the DMCA and "the company removed material from its network for about 45.3% of takedown notices."
    • On the Media broadcast an interview focusing on new copyright enforcement in the U.S. "Starting in the next couple of months, five of the country's largest Internet service providers, AT&T, Cablevision, Comcast, Time Warner Cable and Verizon will implement what is called the Copyright Alert System, known colloquially as 'six strikes.' In the works for over a year, the system is meant to create an escalating series of penalties for serial illegal downloaders." The guest was Jill Lesser, executive director of the Center for Copyright Information, a collaboration between industry associations like the MPAA and RIAA and ISPs. (Transcript available)
    • The Digital Preservation Coalition published the report Intellectual Property Rights and Preservation [PDF 1187KB] by Andrew Charlesworth, focusing on the legal obstacles to preserving digital material. The document focuses on UK law only, but is valuable for its risk assessment and recommended actions, regardless of location.

    What legal and technology stories have you been focused on? Write about those issues in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • OTW Fannews: Legal and Technology Stories

    By Claudia Rebaza on Tiistai, 22 January 2013 - 7:29i.p.
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    • News about a Google TV that interprets its viewers' behavior to recommend shows to them raises questions about how useful such a technology would be, and to whom, not to mention the privacy matters involved. "James McQuivey at Forrester Research said consumers will accept these privacy tradeoffs if they see an advantage to the new style of television. 'If you ask people, of course they will say no,' McQuivey told AFP, while noting that millions have accepted this type of tracing by connecting their TVs to Xbox consoles with Kinect motion detection where 'the camera is tracking you all the time'...But he said companies should be prepared to develop privacy policies to avoid government intervention."
    • Nielsen is also planning to gather consumer data, in this case by following Twitter activity that occurs using the hashtags displayed during TV show broadcasts. "Peter Rice, Chairman and CEO, Fox Networks Group said, 'Twitter is a powerful messenger and a lot of fun for fans of our shows, providing them with the opportunity to engage, connect and voice their opinions directly to each other and us. Combining the instant feedback of Twitter with Nielsen ratings will benefit us, program producers, and our advertising partners.'"
    • Germany may be taking Facebook to court over its policy of banning pseudonyms. "Facebook began cracking down on pseudonym accounts in early 2011, and made a renewed effort to purge such accounts in August 2012. In September, Facebook started encouraging users to report friends who don’t use their real names." Germany was successful in its earlier effort last year when its "state data protection authority sued Facebook over its facial recognition software that automatically recognized and tagged people in photos uploaded to a user’s profile."

    Know about other fandom stories involving Twitter, pseudonyms or television viewing? Write about them in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Links roundup for 6 April 2012

    By Claudia Rebaza on Perjantai, 6 April 2012 - 3:46i.p.
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    Here's a roundup of stories on creator and fan interaction that might be of interest to fans:

    • Star Trek is certainly one of the original geek canons, and in an interview with StarTrek.com, actress Denise Crosby discussed why she made several documentaries about its fans. "[S]ome people didn’t really get what this was all about," she said. "They were kind of mystified by it all. I’d come back from a convention and friends of mine, who’d never seen an episode of Star Trek, would say, ‘What? They have conventions? People ask you questions? They dress up? What?’ I thought it was a phenomenon that had lasted all of this time, that was unique to this franchise. I thought, ‘Something is going on here. Why is that? Why this show? Why aren’t people having Cheers conventions?'"
    • A look at Community fandom would argue that Cheers wasn't the right type of comedy show. "The rabid Community fans differ slightly from the equally-enthusiastic fans of other sitcoms like, say, The Office or the coveted Arrested Development, in that there’s a level of detailed scrutiny, day-to-day obsessiveness and familial pride in being a Community fan that’s reminiscent of the type of fandom more commonly found attached to mythology-inclined genre shows like Supernatural and LOST, not half-hour comedies." This may be because the show "chooses to reward a perceptive and diligent audience with episode-to-episode continuity that builds into an arc and pays off...elaborate and consistent inside jokes" culminating in its "ability to understand the type of situations and relationships that geeks are interested in, which makes it truly For-Us-By-Us, rather than reducing 'us' into easily quantifiable caricatures...that blatantly pander rather than be informed by the culture."
    • Comedian Steve Martin spoke to NPR about his new book, which was drawn from his interactions with fans on Twitter. "You know, I like the idea that one thing leads to another. You can tweet something completely innocuous, and then find yourself going off on a tangent that's inspired by a response...When people started responding, I found they were really writing well." He concludes "I've always believed that there are funny people everywhere, but they're just not comedians."

    If you are a Trek fan, Community fan, a Lost fan, a Supernatural fan or are fannish on Twitter, why not write about it in Fanlore? Additions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

    Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Links roundup for 5 March 2012

    By Claudia Rebaza on Maanantai, 5 March 2012 - 8:36i.p.
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    Here's a roundup of fandom technology stories that might be of interest to fans:

    • Technology has always had a circular relationship with fan practices, with the format and medium shaping what fans could do, and with fans modifying the technology to accommodate their needs. This post about music fans discusses "an extraordinary 20th century of people developing behaviors, values, and communities centered on listening to records" which may now be slipping away due to changes in music distribution. However, fannishness as social glue is a continuing thread: "There was nothing else necessarily in common amongst them at all; they were all different ages and occupations. It was funny to walk into a room where nothing else mattered except he's playing the new Slim Harpo and that was enough to bond you all together."
    • One problem that sometimes springs up is that people, whether outsiders or users, confuse the platform with the practice. In this post about how Twitter changed his sports fandom, the writer notes changes in his life that have more to do with communal fandom and his own willingness to interact. "I realized I wasn't alone", "I understood I was not, in fact, bat s*** crazy", "Gameday will never be the same" and "Twitter has provided me great interaction with terrific people" could have been said in previous decades about platforms which are still in use by some. In fact, fandom today may have more problems due to platform diversity, and corporate or government control, than the inability to connect with other fans.
    • A lengthy Village Voice piece titled Rise of the Facebook Killers cited how "the architecture of communication was distorting the conversation." The artice details some of the problems users face that new projects such as Diaspora* are trying to overcome. "[Y]our posts can easily be imported into Tumblr, Twitter, and even Facebook...Diaspora* can function as a social aggregator, bringing together feeds from various other platforms...you can communicate directly, securely, and without running exchanges past the prying eyes of Zuckerberg." Additionally, "for those worried about malicious government or corporate interference, the distributed network is much less vulnerable to denial of service attacks, which makes the network much harder to take down."

    If the history of fandom technology use interests you, why not contribute to Fanlore? Additions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

    Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Links roundup for 1 February 2012

    By Claudia Rebaza on Keskiviikko, 1 February 2012 - 9:37i.p.
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    Here's a roundup of stories on evolving fandom that might be of interest to fans:

    • Lately it appears that every participant in a collective interest is termed a fanboy, whether they enjoy beer or they follow certain religious figures. GamingUpdate attempted to explain the origins of fans citing a radiology study. "Brain areas responsible for emotion, touch, satisfaction, and memory are involved in our reactions for sex and brand loyalty as well as religion." The author concludes that while sex may be the draw, marketers are to blame for the creation of fandoms. "If your encounters with fanboys (and increasingly fangirls as girl gamers grow more confident in their place in the gaming culture and increasingly reveal their true gender to their guildmates and playmates online) often leaves you angry or frustrated with them, at least you now know who to blame: the advertising executives and the people who create the ad campaigns that give birth to those fanboys."
    • A recent series of essays suggests that the English Romantic Movement created fandom. "Much as the "market revolution" in the United States during the 1830s and 1840s changed the very nature of cultural consumption and participation, Eisner writes that, in England, the Romantic period of the late 18th century...saw the popularization of recognizable "fan practices," spurred by the growth of consumer culture and the development of a mass audience for culture generally.""
    • Perhaps because the series Mad Men deals with the advertising world, its RPG players seem particularly interested in seeing their activities as a professional form of work. Twitter's Betty Draper "Helen Klein Ross established herself as a writer and creative director at top ad agencies like FCB and Ogilvy, but in the last five years she’s reinvented herself as a social media renegade." Ross certainly seems to be keen to stay away from fandom in general, as she claimed that her term "brand fiction" originated at a SWSX presentation given by Mad Men RPG players on Twitter. When an audience member claimed they were performing fan fiction, Ross insisted that it was actually "marketing -- extending the Mad Men story out of the television box and into multiplatforms really markets Mad Men." However, she confessed herself disappointed that AMC chose not to legitmize the Twitter players by utilizing their work in canon.

    If you take part in RPGs, or are part of Mad Men or any other fandom, why not contribute to Fanlore? Additions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

    Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Links Roundup for 9 November 2011

    By Claudia Rebaza on Keskiviikko, 9 November 2011 - 4:20i.p.
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    Here's a roundup of stories on fan relations with entertainment industries that might be of interest to fans:

    • The Social Media Examiner did a video interview with Carri Bugbee about fan fiction and social media as a brand issue for creators. She was unfamiliar with fan fiction when she began tweeting as the Mad Men character Peggy Olson, so she seemed unaware there was a particular term for what she and the other characters do, RPG. She agreed that some people believed that the RPG was a campaign by AMC, Mad Men's network, especially as Twitter was not well known at the time. She explained though that she was more a fan of Twitter than Mad Men so that her participation was more of a social experiment. However, AMC's response was to suspend the Twitter accounts of the RPG participants only a week after they began tweeting together. She described angry fan reaction, and how the accounts were restored in 24 hours with the request that participants should contact AMC's digital marketing department. Her takeaway for companies is that if they don't manage their characters across the web, that others would and the results might not be what the brands would want. The way she approached her participation was to avoid doing anything she wouldn't do if she were getting paid for the job. The interviewer suggested that fan activities were a boon for brands as they were free advertising, but Bugbee warned that fans could not necessarily be co-opted and might be doing things brands didn't like, so they should be bribed with attention and goodies from the brand owners. She concluded that given the usual marketing costs, these expenses would "be nothing."
    • In a guest post at AllThingsD titled Music for Nothing and the Fans for Free a venture capitalist concluded that "When the dust finally settles between the artists, labels, and distribution companies, everyone will finally realize fans are more valuable than recorded music. As traditional monetization models for recorded music sales slowly fade away, new monetization methods centered on the fan will emerge."

    If you're part of Mad Men or a music fandom, why not contribute to Fanlore? Additions are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

    Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Links Roundup for 2 September 2011

    By Claudia Rebaza on Perjantai, 2 September 2011 - 1:54i.p.
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    Here's a roundup of stories about "next generation fandom" that may be of interest to fans:

    • The Wharton business school recently held a For the Win: Serious Gamification conference in which business, government, and education providers came together to discuss how to motivate behavior in work spaces and the marketplace by leveraging their experience with motivating television viewers and fans in online game spaces. The participants noted, however, that success in leveraging fannish behavior in the workspace was dependent on both good design and projects "that really get at something core that people really, genuinely want to do."
    • In this ESPN post, a sports journalist notes that Twitter has not only given athletes a way to interact with fans, but has also colored the way that he reports on those athletes based upon what he learns about them through those interactions. He concludes that "Twitter has given fans a vehicle to root for players as human beings rather than as characterless objects, numerical fractions of a team." Twitter is also enabling fans to root for shows before they air. This Adweek article describes how advertisers are pre-identifying audiences by following conversations about upcoming TV shows. This advertiser attention could allow fans to draw in financial commitments for favorite stars' or producers' projects before they even air.

    If you're part of gaming or sports fandoms why not contribute your experiences to Fanlore? Additions to the site are welcome from all fans.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent Links Roundup — on transformativeworks.org, LJ, or DW — or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

    Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • AO3_Status Feeds

    By .fcoppa on Sunnuntai, 6 December 2009 - 8:59i.p.
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    Vapaa määrittely:

    The Archive of our Own now has its own Twitter feed for status updates, emergency notifications, and other quick messages: AO3_Status.

    You can access this information in several ways:

    * on Twitter
    * embedded on the front page of transformativeworks.org
    * as a LJ feed: http://syndicated.livejournal.com/ao3_status/
    * as a DW feed: http://ao3-status-feed.dreamwidth.org/

    You can get more news and information about the Archive at the A03's own admin blog: http://archiveofourown.org/admin_posts. We also post Archive news to the OTW blog; find it using the archive-update tag set up for that purpose.

  • Sometimes People See Sense...

    By .fcoppa on Lauantai, 7 February 2009 - 3:43a.p.
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    ...The Twitter accounts of fans roleplaying Mad Men characters have been restored, after being briefly taken down for supposed copyright infringment. To quote this excellent summary of this issue from The Guardian, "the accounts returned after the show's marketing department had stepped in to persuade AMC that, whatever the legal standing, it was insane to stop this outpouring of (completely free, you fools) fan-promotion."

    ...We've also heard that many vidders have had positive experiences using YouTube's "dispute" process; that is, so far when vidders have pointed to the creative and transformational nature of their vids, the vids have been restored. We are fans of YouTube's dispute process and we hope that they expand it, thus protecting transformative works from clumsy algorithms that can't detect fair uses.

    Not everyone's been so lucky, though. The EFF has been tracking the January takedowns, and they're calling for YouTube to "not remove videos unless there is a match between the video and audio tracks of a submitted fingerprint." This would stop the wrongful takedowns of transformative works like vidding, and would also stop a number of other ridiculous deletions. The EFF argues that "adding a soundtrack to your home skateboarding movie is a fair use," and they're looking to help people whose work was taken down unfairly.

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