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  • Links Roundup for November 24, 2010

    By .fcoppa on Wednesday, 24 November 2010 - 4:42pm
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    * Board member Rebecca Tushnet has posted notes from a presentation she gave on vidding at Notre Dame's Creativity and the Law Symposium, Scary Monsters: Hybrids, Mashups, and Other Illegitimate Children.

    * TWC editor Kristina Busse has posted Affective Aesthetics to the Symposium Blog, a piece that argues that fan works are still discriminated against because they engage the emotions as well as the critical facility.

    * The New York Times is soliciting Harry Potter fanfic from students; What Would Your Favorite Literary Characters Be Like If Their Stories Never Ended?

    * Moby has founded Moby Gratis, a site which makes music available for free to makers of independent, student, and non-profit films or videos.

    * Dan Pankraz's Generation C: The Connected Collective Consumer sounds an awful lot like fandom.

    We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, event, or link you think we should know about you can submit it in three easy ways: comment on the most recent Link Roundup on LJ, IJ or DW, tag a link with "for:otw_news" on Delicious or give @OTW_News a shoutout on Twitter. Links are welcome in all languages!

    Submitting a link doesn't guarantee that it will be included in a roundup post, and inclusion of a link doesn't mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.

  • Jonathan McIntosh Talks About Fan Vidding

    By .fcoppa on Friday, 19 November 2010 - 6:00pm
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    Political remix artist Jonathan McIntosh, in an interview with Henry Jenkins done as part of an exhibition of DIY video currently ongoing at Henry's blog, discusses what he's learned from fan vidders and how its affected his political remix work.

    (Vidding will be featured next week, so stay tuned.)

  • 24/7 DIY 2010: Collective Action program posted online

    By .fcoppa on Wednesday, 13 October 2010 - 11:39pm
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    The 24/7 DIY Video Summit organized by USC's Institute for Multimedia Literacy has produced a new feature-length program of the latest in DIY video, including fanvids, amvs, prvs, machinima, lip dubs, literal videos, videoblogs, and YouTube videos. The show, 2010: Collective Action was shown at the Hammer Theatre in L.A. on October 5, 2010 and featured a keynote talk by Henry Jenkins. The video program is now online and parallel events are being scheduled at locations around the country.

    Vidding fandom is represented in the program by kiki_miserychic's "I'm on a boat," Obsessive24's "Piece of Me," and Hollywoodgrrl's "Art Bitch." A fuller program of vids, as well as of each of these other genres - amvs, prvs, etc. - will appear on Henry Jenkins' blog over the next few months. OTW Board member and Vidding Committee chair Francesca Coppa curated the vidding section; Tim Park curated the anime music videos; Jonathan McIntosh curated the political remixes.

    24/7 DIY 2010: Collective Action from IML @ USC on Vimeo.

  • Remix (and Response)

    By .fcoppa on Wednesday, 6 October 2010 - 8:32pm
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    Political remixer Jonathan McIntosh released a new political remix video, Right Wing Radio Duck.

    And Glen Beck responds (rather hilariously, with a paranoid theory about Jonathan's "federal funding" - though apparently with some comprehension of and support of fair use!):

  • Star Wars Fan Film Wins Emmy

    By .fcoppa on Saturday, 28 August 2010 - 2:11pm
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    Congratulations to the makers of Star Wars Uncut who last week won an Emmy for “outstanding creative achievement in interactive media" for their collaboratively made, "crowd-sourced" fan film.

    The group divided the original Star Wars film into 15 second chunks, and then invited fans to claim a segment and remake it in whatever creative way they wanted. The pieces were then edited back together to make a new version of the film--or, more accurately, many versions of a new film, since each segment has been remade more than once. (A computer program lets you move between them.)

    The group is currently “working through the legal issues" with Lucasfilm to produce a full version of the film with official Star Wars soundtrack; Lucasfilm is apparently supportive of the project.

  • Rumblefish Proposes (Highly Restrictive) Song Licensing System

    By .fcoppa on Thursday, 1 July 2010 - 4:43am
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    The New York Times reports that a company called Rumblefish is partnering with YouTube to license songs to amateur video artists for use in noncommercial videos at $1.99 each. At the moment, they do not represent any major labels, though they are hoping to expand (don't hold your breath, given the difficulties the major labels have had with most new business models).

    While this idea certainly has the potential to be beneficial for vidders and other remix artists, and the price is comparable to a ringtone or higher-quality download, this isn't the solution: the license Rumblefish and YouTube are offering doesn't allow users to remix, mash up, speed up, slow down, alter or translate lyrics or do lots of other things that vidders and other remix artists routinely do; all you can do is cut the length of the song. Also, you are only permitted to stream your video, and only at authorized sites like YouTube; you can't offer your vid for download, or stream from your own site. Moreover, the licence stipulates that your use:

    must not be pornographic, promote hate or violence, must not be libelous, defamatory, fraudulent, infringing or otherwise illegal, and must not involve criticism of Friendly Music, Rumblefish, UGC Network, or any of their products or services.

    And of course they get to decide what is okay and what isn't. (Doesn't that make you want to make an anti-Rumblefish political remix right now?)

    While this service might be useful for makers of home movies and amateur films who just want to add a soundtrack to their child's birthday party or high school graduation, transformative works like vids, anime music videos, and political remix videos are not using music as a soundtrack. In these transformative works, the music is a crucial part of the message, and the message is a form of speech.

    This seems like an attempt by Rumblefish and YouTube to charge noncommercial video makers for fewer rights than they already have. In fact, it's interesting that Rumblefish and YouTube are trying to create a market to license songs to amateur video makers just as laws like Canada's Copyright Modernization Act are proposing the legalization of noncommercial remix - but only if it doesn't aversely affect "an existing or potential market." Minimalist licenses for some songs, no matter how affordable, can't substitute for fair use.

  • OTW at the RE/Mixed Festival, NYC May 30th, 2010

    By .fcoppa on Friday, 21 May 2010 - 4:24pm
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    Fans of remix culture! If you're in or around NYC on Sunday, May 30th, consider coming down to the RE/Mixed Media Festival 2010 at the Galapagos Art Space in DUMBO. The festival's schedule includes: video remixes, discussions with remix artists and DJs, a panel on gaming culture, lots of DJs and musical remixes and even a remixed fashion show. Mimosas will be served at the 2 pm opening and best of all--it's free. The OTW will have a table there during the day--so come say hi!

  • Links Roundup for May 5, 2010

    By .fcoppa on Wednesday, 5 May 2010 - 4:06am
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    Here's a roundup of stories, videos, and articles that might be of interest to fans!

    * A Tangle of Thorns is a literary mashup of Nabokov's "Lolita" and Lessig's "Future of Ideas" by the suspiciously-named "Otto Lambert". (Lolita's already been remixed before: Pia Pera wrote "Lo's Diary" retelling the story from Lolita's point of view.)

    * The EFF has provided a list of its favorite books in such categories as Copyright, Trademark and Innovation, Privacy, Technology, and International Internet Culture.

    * In The End of History (NY Times), Marc Aronson argues that "In order for electronic books to live up to their billing, the system in which nonfiction writers get permission to use copyrighted material in new work has to be fixed."

    * When Copyright Goes Bad is a film about how copyright is affecting consumers, and features some key players in the debate, including Fred Von Lohmann of the EFF, Jim Killock of the Open Rights Group, and Hank Shocklee - Co-founder of Public Enemy.

    * ...and hey, they DID get a "Hitler Reacts to the Hitler parodies being removed from YouTube!" video up after all!

    Hitler reacts to the Hitler parodies being removed from YouTube - Plankhead (youtube.com)

  • YouTube's Content Filters Take Action Against Hitler (And Why That's A Bad Thing)

    By .fcoppa on Tuesday, 20 April 2010 - 3:35pm
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    TechCrunch is reporting that YouTube's content filters have stopped allowing uploads of new iterations of the Hitler meme - you know, the hundreds of videos where Hitler rants about...Windows Vista, or Sarah Palin, or how much the Phantom Menace sucked. (Those videos.) The article, Hitler Is Very Upset That Constantin Film Is Taking Down Hitler Parodies reports that newer version of the meme have been replaced with, "This video contains content from Constantin Film, who has blocked it on copyright grounds," despite the obvious claims to fair use (transformation! parody! politics! speech! endless back-and-forth creativity and engagement); they also think it is likely that the filtering system will slowly crawl its way through and delete all the others.

    YouTube's filter won't even allow its users to make the obvious response: Hitler Reacts to YouTube Blocking "Hitler Reacts" Video Parodies. There's something satisfyingly, if depressingly, ironic here, just the way there was when amazon deleted purchased copies of Orwell's 1984 off the Kindle.

  • Links Roundup

    By .fcoppa on Monday, 15 February 2010 - 5:08am
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    * Fanlore has hit 10,000 articles!!! We're not 100 percent sure, but we think the 10,000th article was on fan Virginia Lee Smith. For Valentine's Day, consider adding someone or something you love to Fanlore!

    * Author, 17, Says It's 'Mixing,' Not Plagiarism: A young German novelist has published a bestselling novel called Axolotl Roadkill which cites--or as the author says, remixes--chunks of various other published works without attribution. While some have called this plagiarism, others see the quotations as thematic, and the accusations have not stopped the book from being nominated for a major prize.

    * NPR did a story about World's Fair Use Day called When Fair Use Isn't Fair: the story features interviews with Jonathan McIntosh, Public Knowledge president Gigi Sohn, and others.

    * Last but not least, friend of the OTW Nina Paley, the animator who made Sita Sings The Blues, has been making "minute memes" for QuestionCopyright.org. Her latest work is called All Creative Work Is Derivative; that link will take you to a description of her process in making this video.

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