OTW Fannews: Keepers of the Flame

OTW Fannews Banner title in red with envelope icon

  • At Nerd Reactor Genevieve LeBlanc wrote about the joy of fandom. “It was Simon Pegg that said that being a geek was ‘a license to proudly emote on a somewhat childish level rather than behave like a supposed adult. Being a geek is extremely liberating.’ For me, it means I have the ability to take joy from small moments like these. The happiness is disproportional to the actual significance of the event; I got immense entertainment with friends about two Coke bottles sharing names with fictional characters. It’s absolutely meaningless, but being a nerd means that it gets to make me happy. And who can deny the benefit of a little extra happiness in our lives?”
  • At ESPN CricInfo Ahmer Naqvi took a thoughtful look at what fan activities consist of. “The realisation coincided with a time in my life when I was experiencing and learning to enjoy so much more that the world had to offer…suddenly everything in cricket (other than perhaps an India-Pakistan game) was expendable in a way it hadn’t been before. And it is then that a part of me could finally accept, and be even confident of the fact, that not adhering to the rituals I had made up in my head didn’t mean that I didn’t love the game. Because eventually it wasn’t about what I needed to prove to others but about what it gave to me.”
  • At Noisey, Luke Winkie took a look back at the relevance of Wizard Rock. “There are still some wizard rock bands propping up the scene—hiding out in ancient Myspaces or hidden Bandcamps. But none are quite as active or in-demand like Harry and the Potters…It didn’t matter who you were, you could always relate to someone about Hogwarts. It’s hard to find stuff like that in adulthood. The fandom has dissipated in popular culture, so you’re forced to keep it alive in your head. It makes Harry and the Potters a nostalgia act, to a certain extent—expected from a band that’s only put out two new songs in the last five years. ‘People come to our shows to reconnect to that ‘midnight release party’ vibe,’ says Paul DeGeorge. ‘It conjures a lot of those feelings that haven’t been exercised in years.’”
  • The Orlando Weekly took note of a planned fanfiction reading. “Love it or hate it, fan fiction has become one of the most popular literary forms of the 21st century. Hordes of scribblers of wildly varying talent regularly post hundreds of thousands of unauthorized expansions of various fandoms to sites like AO3 or FanFiction.net. Some fanfic writers even get published after doing a search-and-replace of proper nouns and we all suffer for it (*cough*Fifty Shades*cough*). So of course local literary kingpins Jesse Bradley of There Will Be Words and John King of ‘The Drunken Odyssey’ have teamed up to, uh, celebrate the genre.”

What have you seen that best expresses the love of fandoms? Write about it in Fanlore! Contributions are welcome from all fans.

We want your suggestions! If you know of an essay, video, article, podcast, or link you think we should know about, comment on the most recent OTW Fannews post. Links are welcome in all languages! Submitting a link doesn’t guarantee that it will be included in a Fannews post, and inclusion of a link doesn’t mean that it is endorsed by the OTW.